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nathan slobodkin

Glued together bow frog

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Just had the misfortune of having a client bring a bow in for a rehair which had not only the head  plug glued in but also the slide.  This is not a super valuable bow but the client would like to save it. The slide is not just stuck. I am quite certain it is glued and judging from the head plug I would say that it was a liberal dose of super glue used. Acetone does nothing and I am concerned that even if I drill out the center part of the slide I will still have to cut out the backing and pearl from the  under cut of the dove tail. When I make a slide I shape the pearl with files and am guessing that using my bow chisels to shave away the remaining ebony and pearl  would be likely to risk cracking  the rails as well as being pretty hard on my chisels. Any body have some thoughts on this?

Also while I am here Let me ask about tools that can help with the other job that reluctant bow rehairers some times are forced to deal with which is replacing a worn eyelet. Using a regular drill press for tapping fine threads in old wood has it's problems and I have heard of some kind of jig/tool which makes this easier.

Any help from the bowmakers in the group would be appreciated.

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Perhaps after you drilled out the center part of the slide:   1.  The acetone would be better able to access the glue.  2.  Perhaps immersing the frog in acetone would do it.  3.  Perhaps heating the frog under a light bulb would weaken the glue bond.

Alternatively, you could find another frog that fits the stick.

I never attempt to tap eyelet holes in frogs.  I just drill the right size hole and screw the eyelet in.  You can drill experimental holes in scrap ebony to determine the right size bit.

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Heat will help, but acetone in shallow bowl (covered) would do it safer (overnight). I used to glue several pieces of pearl together with CA glue for turning or cutting and acetone will eventually work its way inside the tight joints.

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So out of curiosity, does anyone use anything to help keep the tip wedge in? After rehairing 6 bows in the past few weeks, three if them have had some substance holding the hair to the mortice/wedge. One looked like super glue, one some kind of waxy substance (which basically filled the mortice but came out fairly easily) and one looked like either hide glue or rosin.

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9 hours ago, FiddleDoug said:

Before you do anything, call the client with the new price for the work! That's not the same as a regular rehair!

 

No kidding!

In this case I will be selling the client a new bow but I can envision situations  where this would have to be dealt with and while one can hope that this never happens to nice bows the number of con persons and idiots willing to tackle a bow rehair would suggest that the possibility exists. Said idiots are also quite likely to blame the reporter for the problem and while my clients trust me there is always  that little smell which lingers after such an incident which I would be happier to avoid. Telling the client you had to charge them for a new slide is one thing but telling them that they won't get their bow back for their audition tomorrow is quite another.

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The Alberti tool is worth having. Also, to elaborate on Brad’s post,  putting in two small kerfs with a file at the end of the eyelet helps to thread it into the hole.

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5 hours ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

The Alberti tool is worth having. Also, to elaborate on Brad’s post,  putting in two small kerfs with a file at the end of the eyelet helps to thread it into the hole.

Thanks Jerry. Do you have an efficient way of cutting out a slide if needed?

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2 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Thanks Jerry. Do you have an efficient way of cutting out a slide if needed?

Not really.  I keep a tool in my box that we refer to as “the aneyealator” that is a spring loaded center punch that very effectively shatters out pearl eyes that need to be replaced, I imagine it would do the same with a slide.  I usually throw these out as they are usually painfully inexpensive bows.

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This is embarrassing but.......

Years ago I worked in a shop where a bow with a tortoise shell frog came in for a rehair. The slide was totally stuck. We tried all of the usual methods of getting the slide out. Nothing worked. We were quite sure that the slide had become stuck due to super/Krazy/CA glue so we tried soaking the frog in a vessel filled with acetone. It took quite a while but eventually the slide came free. Unfortunately the frog was imitation tortoise shell and dissolved. Mush! We replaced the frog with a suitable ebony match.

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On 2/26/2019 at 4:13 AM, Fiddler45 said:

So out of curiosity, does anyone use anything to help keep the tip wedge in? After rehairing 6 bows in the past few weeks, three if them have had some substance holding the hair to the mortice/wedge. One looked like super glue, one some kind of waxy substance (which basically filled the mortice but came out fairly easily) and one looked like either hide glue or rosin.

 

....anyone?....

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I didn't answer you the first time you asked because I thought your question to be enough of a change of topic to deserve its own thread rather than hijacking this one, which is about removing a stuck slide from a frog.  If you start a new thread with your question, I will answer it.

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HI Nathan,


There's one mechanical method you might try before going into destructo mode.

If you (carefully) glue some wood to the pearl, it gives you something you can give some sharp whacks to break a hopefully brittle bond (or too tight a square machined fit.).

I usually use CA but probably hide glue would give the best shear strength.

Some caveats:

Obviously, control where glue flows or you've just made matters worse.

Give thought to how you support the frog. You can easily damage it. Especially vulnerable the front of the underslide and thumb projection if you’re tempted to press them against your bench as a backstop.

You may end up separating the shell from its backing. No biggie. Repeat for the backing and glue them back together or make a new backing.

If all works well you'll have to remove the added wood from the pearl. You can pare or file it down to where it's just paper thin and then moisten the remaining fibers with acetone and they'll rub off.

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190302_142922~2.jpg

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