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DoorMouse

Wings with 2 cuts- Zygmuntowicz

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I just noticed that on several Samuel Zygmuntowicz violins he divides the normally straight end of the ff-hole wings into two separate cuts. 
Does this come from a specific tradition or is it more a personal touch to set his instruments apart?
I haven't seen it before. 

 

Screen_Shot_2019-02-10_at_11_53.08_AM.thumb.png.58af1c6f0b6179e7c40cc390505056e1.png

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13 minutes ago, DoorMouse said:

I just noticed that on several Samuel Zygmuntowicz violins he divides the normally straight end of the ff-hole wings into two separate cuts. 
Does this come from a specific tradition or is it more a personal touch to set his instruments apart?
I haven't seen it before. 

 

Screen_Shot_2019-02-10_at_11_53.08_AM.thumb.png.58af1c6f0b6179e7c40cc390505056e1.png

My guess is he f'd one up when he carved them and then did it to the other to make it look even.

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39 minutes ago, Michael Appleman said:

That's how he does his "personal" model as opposed to a "bench copy."

meaning; one day while carving an ff hole he chipped of the end and thought, "hey that looks pretty good" 

just kidding, it is an interesting detail that I never knew about

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Ha, my first reaction was "oh look, a broken wing" and then "oh, there's another one.. and another!"
It is interesting how it looks normal till you get up close.  I like how it adds a geometric sharpness to the overall look. 
I imagine it pairs well with crisp edgework.

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5 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

That's how he does his "personal" model as opposed to a "bench copy."

What is the difference? Is one a copy of, for instance, a Strad pattern instrument and the other one is his own pattern? Or is does it mean something else?

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5 hours ago, jezzupe said:

meaning; one day while carving an ff hole he chipped of the end and thought, "hey that looks pretty good" 

just kidding, it is an interesting detail that I never knew about

I know you are joking, but it is amazing how often genius can turn an accident into art

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I saw that as well on Tarisio's auction list.   I've been wondering about it but I don't think this was an accident.  The angles don't match up for it to be a chipped corner.  The point is in almost the exact center of each wing.  I think it was very intentional.  I don't know the details - maybe this was by request from someone who commissioned it?

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I totally get the fact that this  is by way of a Zygnature, but  personally I do not find it aesthetically pleasing. I certainly would not say no to one, however.

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11 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

That's how he does his "personal" model as opposed to a "bench copy."

I recall seeing one of these on Sam's bench when I first visited him 10 years ago, and at first I thought it was an oopsie.  But he doesn't make oopsies.  I don't know if he's still doing it this way.  I'm not a fan of the kinky look.

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7 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

What is the difference? Is one a copy of, for instance, a Strad pattern instrument and the other one is his own pattern? Or is does it mean something else?

If you order his standard model, you'll get his personal favourite Del Gesu inspired model with these f-holes and a moderately antiqued/shaded finish. If you want a copy of a specific violin like the Panette Del Gesu, he'll make that with the appropriate f-hole wing shape and antiquing that approximates the original. 

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15 hours ago, jezzupe said:

My guess is he f'd one up when he carved them and then did it to the other to make it look even.

He's actually leaving more wood on, as opposed to fixing an "oopsie" by taking more wood off. I'm not sure I like it personally, but it's one way to be different that shouldn't have much effect on the sound or playability.

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6 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

The f holes would fit well if he did a Gedler "Wellengeige" copy http://www.geigenbau-jaumann.de/die-gedler-wellengeige.html

I have always wondered as to the reasoning behind this design. Mainly, why? Was he just an eccentric, or is there more behind this idea? Did others also use this design? I would love to hear more.

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1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

Perhaps it's based on some acoustic theory, leaving a little more sound radiating surface area on the wing flaps.

I asked him about it, and he said it was purely to do something distinctive visually.  No deep acoustic ideas.

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32 minutes ago, arglebargle said:

I have always wondered as to the reasoning behind this design. Mainly, why? Was he just an eccentric, or is there more behind this idea? Did others also use this design? I would love to hear more.

I don't think anyone really knows. One could think of it as a manefestation of the rococo period of the baroque, where ornementation was particularly extravagent. I would like to have a Gedler "Wellengeige" myself though. There was always (probably still is, a fake one) in the Stadtmuseum in Munich, so it's nice that a Munich colleague has found a real one.

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Maybe adding style to the end of the wings is a Brooklyn thing!  :)This old 'Brooklyn' violin I posted recently has curves on the wing ends.  Something I don't recall seeing anywhere else.   

I'm not so turned on about the 2-stroke ends, but you've got to appreciate Zyg's work, it's the top of the heap around here. Hey, some Americans can make good violins, even if their ancestors were immigrants!

 

image.png.38cd8c4e03abf5efb8ffd0f50b5d33ea.png

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1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

I don't think anyone really knows. One could think of it as a manefestation of the rococo period of the baroque, where ornementation was particularly extravagent. I would like to have a Gedler "Wellengeige" myself though. There was always (probably still is, a fake one) in the Stadtmuseum in Munich, so it's nice that a Munich colleague has found a real one.

As Herr Jaumann is writing at the website, it was a repair job for "a gentleman from Füssen". The 139(!) photos are documenting many details of the repair and internal structure of the violin, most highly interesting.

In the Berlin Musikinstrumentenmuseum I saw many years ago such a violin as part of a "Beethoven's instruments" collection. Unfortunately I don't know what happened to them.

At least one can get somehow dizzy looking at this outline, maybe the maker had consumed some sort of mushrooms when designing it.:rolleyes:

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