Rimino

VARNISH POTS

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

does anyone have a good way to clean varnish pots?  Right now I’m trying to make Colophony linseed oil varnish right and would like to save money by using the same pot.  Thanks a lot for the help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MANFIO said:

I wash jam glass pots. In general they have a wide mouth, wich is good .

Do you use the jam glass pots to store the varnish in? Or, what do you use for cooking pots? Do you use acetone too, or another cleaner? Thanks a lot for your help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/4/2019 at 10:34 PM, Rimino said:

Do you use the jam glass pots to store the varnish in? Or, what do you use for cooking pots? Do you use acetone too, or another cleaner? Thanks a lot for your help

To store the varnish. I wash them in the dish washer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the pot is stainless steel i used to always use caustic soda , It removed every varnish i ever made easily. Turns  the varnish into soap which can be just washed away. But if you arent experienced in using caustic chemicals maybe use something else less caustic like sodium carbonate .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this is good advice for the original poster. On the other hand for doing a lot of varnish work it must be pointed out that nice jars can be obtained very cheaply and if time and money are part of the equation it is best to save  on labor and chemicals by treating them as disposable items

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, David Burgess said:

A long soak in a closed container of household ammonia does it for me.

Worked easy and well.  Haven’t completely cleaned the pot for several cooks. Thanks for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Melvin Goldsmith said:

All this is good advice for the original poster. On the other hand for doing a lot of varnish work it must be pointed out that nice jars can be obtained very cheaply and if time and money are part of the equation it is best to save  on labor and chemicals by treating them as disposable items

 

Depends on whether you are using the containers for cooking or storage.

I mostly use old Popov glass vodka bottles for storage. These will not survive the cooking temperatures I use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Melvin Goldsmith said:

All this is good advice for the original poster. On the other hand for doing a lot of varnish work it must be pointed out that nice jars can be obtained very cheaply and if time and money are part of the equation it is best to save  on labor and chemicals by treating them as disposable items

 

 

My wife makes fun of me because I buy condiments and other foodstuffs based on jar size and shape. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

My wife makes fun of me because I buy condiments and other foodstuffs based on jar size and shape. :lol:

And that's the only reason I buy vodka. :lol:

For something that needs to be mixed or stirred, I buy baby food in those little glass containers. For cooking small batches of varnish, I use single-serve size pyrex custard bowls which are meant for oven use, since they will survive the heat. For larger batches, I use porcelain enamel coated steel pots. The custard dishes and enamel-coated pots are the ones I clean and re-use.

Supposedly, the porcelain-enamel coating on the pots will eventually develop micro-cracks from the thermal cycling, so that's something to be aware of if cooking something which will react with iron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While we're at it, those new yogurts made by Yoplait "Oui" come in perfect little jars that are great to use as a container to hold the varnish while working with it....tiny, solid,heavy and slightly conical, helps it stay in place. Unfortunately they don't have lids for storage, but the jar has a very nice size and heft for use in application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wise and venerable david van zandt cooks his varnish, then pours it warm into metal paint tubes and seals them up. When it is time to varnish, he squeezes a bit out and lets a hot lightbulb heat it through a fine mesh filter onto his plate and gets to work. one of the cleanest, most elegant solutions for storage and conservation I've seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cooking and storage system is similar to others. I cook in ceramic Corningware with no mishaps to date. I store large batches in Mason jars from spaghetti sauce (Classico and other brands). Working batches are in 2 or 4 oz jelly jars. No iron touches my varnish. All varnish is stored in a cool, dark cabinet. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.