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Rue

So...why didn't the Germans keep up with the Italians?

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1 hour ago, martin swan said:

As we are discussing with hilarious bampot "reguz" over on a parallel thread, arching and sound are indivisible.

Yup, our local equivalent to "bampot" is "dip weed".  I know one when I hear one.  I've been giving that thread a wide berth.  :lol:

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Well that's a Stradivari .... and cornerless rather than flat.

All the same, I think we can put it down to youthful naiveté - he got rid of it pretty fast. I haven't played it but I understand it's very dark and syrupy ....

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1 hour ago, martin swan said:

Well that's a Stradivari .... and cornerless rather than flat.

All the same, I think we can put it down to youthful naiveté - he got rid of it pretty fast. I haven't played it but I understand it's very dark and syrupy ....

He got rid of it because it was too 'different', or because of the sound?

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15 minutes ago, Rue said:

He got rid of it because it was too 'different', or because of the sound?

I suspect it's because the Gibson, Ex-Huberman plays circles around the Chanot-Chardon, which has been at Bein and Fushi for an age at this point. 

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23 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

I live in Texas, where Bodark ( B’ois d’arc) is a very common wood, and very beautiful, the color is a deep orange red. The wood is extremely hard to work, one of the hardest of the hardwoods, but I have often wondered if anybody has ever ventured a Cello back out of Bodark?

I don't know this wood or if any luthiers have tried it but from your description I would expect it to have a rather hard, dry sound which is exactly the opposite of what most cellists want. The reason willows and other soft deciduous trees work for cellos and violas is that people expect those instruments to have a rounder and fatter sound.

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1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

I don't know this wood or if any luthiers have tried it but from your description I would expect it to have a rather hard, dry sound which is exactly the opposite of what most cellists want. The reason willows and other soft deciduous trees work for cellos and violas is that people expect those instruments to have a rounder and fatter sound.

Interestingly enough, I was just at the violin shop yesterday, and I mentioned the subject to my friend Jay. He pointed out that in his wood room was a big chunk of bow dark, perhaps 3 feet long, and about 8 inches in diameter. It had been cut in half lengthwise and the piece that was there perhaps weighed 30 pounds. It was tremendously dense.

It had been brought to him by a colleague who owns a shop in Spain who had asked him to cut it into bow blanks, thinking that it would probably be a fine bow wood.

Bodark is famous for ruining sawblades because it is so hard, so the chunk was sitting there gathering dust.

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9 hours ago, martin swan said:

Well that's a Stradivari .... and cornerless rather than flat.

All the same, I think we can put it down to youthful naiveté - he got rid of it pretty fast. I haven't played it but I understand it's very dark and syrupy ....

 

7 hours ago, Rue said:

He got rid of it because it was too 'different', or because of the sound?

Probably my imagination, but I always think he looks sad or uncomfortable in pictures with that fiddle.

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It had been brought to him by a colleague who owns a shop in Spain who had asked him to cut it into bow blanks, thinking that it would probably be a fine bow wood.

 

It is famous as an archery bow wood.  Not as dense as Pernambuco.   Beautiful wood.  Worth experimenting with!!

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17 hours ago, martin swan said:

Well that's a Stradivari .... and cornerless rather than flat.

All the same, I think we can put it down to youthful naiveté - he got rid of it pretty fast. I haven't played it but I understand it's very dark and syrupy ....

And let's not forget that this wasn't made as a violin. It was originally some sort of viol that was converted to violin stringing and set-up. Dark and syrupy can be fun, but if one actually needs to be heard, and actually wants more than one tone colour or dynamic, it can be a bit of a handicap!

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6 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

but if one actually needs to be heard, and actually wants more than one tone colour or dynamic

Well, recording won't tell you all truth if well engineered, but I still like it! :)

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