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Thomas Coleman's bench


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15 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Nice! Is this for someone, or did you just need to make it?

Thanks JIm.  It's not for anyone in particular.  A friend of mine piqued my interest in making one awhile back.  It was finally time to give it a try.  Should be a fun challenge!  As you know, it not only has to look nice but has to play and sound nice too, but they are built so LIGHT!  Fingers crossed.

9 hours ago, Urban Luthier said:

Really nice work!

Thank you for the kind words Urban.

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3 hours ago, Thomas Coleman said:

Thanks JIm.  It's not for anyone in particular.  A friend of mine piqued my interest in making one awhile back.  It was finally time to give it a try.  Should be a fun challenge!  As you know, it not only has to look nice but has to play and sound nice too, but they are built so LIGHT!  Fingers crossed.

Thank you for the kind words Urban.

Built from the heart, all the better. Although selling it is best. I hope I get to hear it. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Baroque guitar bridge.  I debated just drilling string holes in it as opposed to cutting the triangular string channels but then I read about a speculation that the triangles contributed to the tone of the baroque guitar.  This makes sense seeing that the bridge on a guitar acts as a kind of brace.  The triangles would definitely allow more movement of the top.  As everywhere on this Stradivari inspired guitar it is built very lightly.  

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53 minutes ago, Thomas Coleman said:

Thanks Shelbow!  I love early music and it's instruments and think your bows are too cool!

Many thanks :-)

I look forward to seeing your finished Baroque Guitar. I studied guitar making originally so I do love guitars.

I think you should make a Baryton next ;)

 

 

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On 4/25/2021 at 11:52 PM, Thomas Coleman said:

Ach!  I would love to.  I doubt it would ever get passed the "dreaming" stage :D

This is a great book if you are interested in Barytons https://www.amazon.co.uk/History-Baryton-Its-Music-Instruments/dp/0810869179/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=baryton&qid=1619598322&rnid=1642204031&s=books&sr=1-1

It is very expensive now, but when it first came out I bought a copy and it was half this price.

Shame you are not in the UK otherwise I would post you my copy to read.

 

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That book looks great.  I believe that Warren Shingleton is making a baryton.  He does exceptional work.  Thanks for the line on that book, I'll keep an eye out.  I was recently surprised to find a french language viola da gamba building book available for Kindle!  I bought it even though I don't speak any french, a wee bit of spanish and italian, but no french.  I just appreciated the idea of supporting the author and I may be able to glean a tidbit of info.  Building a gamba is high on my list.

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You might be interested in this book from a historical point of view and it's not crazy expensive (yet) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Viol-History-Instrument-Annette-Otterstedt/dp/3761811519

That sounds great in regards to the French viola da gamba book. If you know a bit of Italian that might help as all these languages are derived from Latin so they share some similarities.

When I studied instrument making we were sometimes supervised by the Gamba maker Norman Myall. He was probably the best person we had advice wise and a lovely chap.

 

 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've been knee deep in trying to learn the finer points of baroque rosette making.  I can totally see why Masters like Elena Dal Cortivo and Mateo Cremades specialize in them and if I decide to make another baroque guitar I will give serious consideration to purchasing one from either of them!  After much practice and frustration I have a rosette that I am happy with.  Far from great but usable.  The top layer is 1mm Swiss pear, cut out with a jewelers saw and then glued to the second, still whole, .7mm Swiss pear layer. The second layer was also cut out with a jewelers saw and the both of these layers were glued to the third, still whole, .4mm layer of cotton paper.  The third layer was cut with an xacto knife and posed the most challenges.  I was having a hard time sourcing parchment that I thought suitable and my guess is that while parchment poses it's own unique challenges (hard to glue being one) it would've been easier to work.  Anyway, the challenges were fun, if not a wee frustrating...and now, after a 2 week vakay to see family in Montana, I can continue with the guitar

 

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The rosettes look amazing. Nice to see them on the big screen vs. the wee little pics on my phone. Very attractive wood. I have an inlay request for a box (that I haven't learned how to do yet). Where did you get your veneer wood from? 

Cheers,

Jim

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Thanks Jim.  I really like the look of the pear wood.  It's color almost looks like cherry sometimes.  I got the thin (first practice rosette, .5mm) veneer from an ebay seller named acutemaquetry.  I've bought from them before and have been pleased.  The thicker veneer I cut from a bigger piece of pear that I got, I believe, from Cook hardwoods.  I'd be happy to send you some of the thinner veneer when I get back from vacation if you'd like.  Lemme know.

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