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Time for hair to dry and reason for it?


DrTodd
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I've been calling around trying to figure out where to do a rehair.  One place says if I dropped it off super early then due to the time to wait for the hair to dry it could be picked up right before closing.  Pretty inconvenient when you live far away.  Another place said it was 24 hour turn-around in part due to hair drying time.  Those places are smaller shops with 1 or 2 employees.  There's a larger string shop with like 10 employees who offer a 1-hour turn-around.  I watched a couple rehairing videos from other people on YouTube and their stated drying times were no longer than 1/2 hour.

So, what's the theory here?  Full drying is the best because different hairs may dry differently and you end up with different tensions if you've put it together when it isn't dry?  In one video, I saw someone pass the hair through a flame at the end to shrink hairs that were looser than others.  So, is this an either-or thing?  You can let it fully dry and not have to shrink in the flame but for faster turn-around you can speed up the process with the flame?

So, in short, what's up with these wildly disparate times?  Is a 1-hour job going to be inherently inferior to 8-hours?

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4 hours ago, DrTodd said:

I've been calling around trying to figure out where to do a rehair.  One place says if I dropped it off super early then due to the time to wait for the hair to dry it could be picked up right before closing.  Pretty inconvenient when you live far away.  Another place said it was 24 hour turn-around in part due to hair drying time.  Those places are smaller shops with 1 or 2 employees.  There's a larger string shop with like 10 employees who offer a 1-hour turn-around.  I watched a couple rehairing videos from other people on YouTube and their stated drying times were no longer than 1/2 hour.

So, what's the theory here?  Full drying is the best because different hairs may dry differently and you end up with different tensions if you've put it together when it isn't dry?  In one video, I saw someone pass the hair through a flame at the end to shrink hairs that were looser than others.  So, is this an either-or thing?  You can let it fully dry and not have to shrink in the flame but for faster turn-around you can speed up the process with the flame?

So, in short, what's up with these wildly disparate times?  Is a 1-hour job going to be inherently inferior to 8-hours?

In short, no.  Many rehairers will soak the hair when working, and some only use enough water to take advantage of the liquid tension to hold the hair in a ribbon when working.  In either case, hair dryers were invented long ago.....

The flaming is something different and inherently inferior.

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I'm not sure what the purpose of wetting the hair during rehairing is.  The first person who taught me rehairing said that wetting the hair and letting it dry equalizes the tension among the hairs and pre-stretches the hairs so that they will stretch less during use.  If time allows, I like to soak the hair after it's in the bow and set it aside to dry overnight.  And when I do this the hair does seem to be a bit longer than it was before I soaked it, sometimes requiring me to adjust its length, and the hair ribbon does seem to be neater and more compact.  I sometimes speed up the drying with a hair dryer.  If it's a rush job -- for example if the customer is waiting -- I rehair without any water at all.

The purpose of flaming is not to dry the hair; it is to shrink individual hairs that are too long.

I think the explanation for the wildly disparate times is that different people follow different rehairing procedures and that different shops vary in how accommodating they are to their customers.

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The different turnaround times may be influenced by the backlog of work that each shop has and whether the bow rehairing staff is in-house. 

In addition to doing violin work, I rehair bows for three shops in my area. I carry the bows home to my workshop where I do all the rehairing and repairs. I bring my tools in and do bows for customers while they wait with a turnaround time of one hour if their bows have a value over $25k because the shop insurance only covers me up to that level if the bow is outside the shop’s premises. 

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Have no idea if this is overkill or not but one teacher told me they soaked all their hair bundles in the tub (and let it dry as a bundle) before use because of having been burned by unscrupulous sources that stretched their hair before sale (longer hair fetches higher prices). The idea was to get the bundle back to its natural length beforehand rather than risk it shrinking on the bow. BTW their technique was one of Jerry's options: minimal wetting during rehair just to tame the combing.

 

Does this actually happen with wholesalers? And would soaking restore the hair?
 

 

 

 

 

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I often rehair  bows  while  the  customer  waits. But occasionally  they have to wait  a bit longer than expected, if I mess the thing up and  have  to start  again. That'll  happen  to any rehairer - from time to time,  you'll misjudge things and make the hair too short  or too sloppy. 

So some people prefer to have a bit more time, rather than work under pressure.  And I wouldn't  expect  anyone  to have a walk in service with having  an appointment. 

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