Is this tatted up runt of a violin a long way from home? Why does it even exist?


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On ‎12‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 5:34 PM, BassClef said:

 

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, BassClef said:

 

 

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22 hours ago, BassClef said:

 

 

 

 

 

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Regarding the origin of the OP object:

 

This violin has painted purfling, through neck, absence of either blocks or linings, saddle only for the top half of the belly, one might assume that the the bar was originaly carved before someone eradicated it(?), 4 o’clock scroll with delta, beechwood scroll(?)

 

All of these features are reminicant of the late period of Salzkammergut work. Wheras they made some fine instruments there in the 18thC (e.g. the Gändl Cello I presented recently), the further the 19th C. advanced, the more cheap and hasty the Salzkammergut violins became, to the point that they don‘t really qualify as violins anymore, more toys, or souveniers. This was due to the Vogtländische industrialisierung, where the Markneukirchen dealers sent more and more cheaper and cheaper violins in wheelbarrow loads to the various town fares and markets.As a counter to this, the locals had to get cheaper and cheaper too, to the point where they left whole working steps out (linings for instance). In fact the only thing that speaks against a really cheap and hasty Salzkammergut one, is the veneered finger board, where I would expect a maple one, painted black. This crushing price competition lead to the demise of the violin making tradition there, the bitter poverty attracting the working folk to the newly arived tourism.This is perhaps an analogy to American manufacturing industy in times where it is cheaper to buy anything from China.

I think it inconcievable that this is an amatuer work, American or otherwise, rather a work of a wreched violin maker working at maximum speed with minimum concern for any sort of quality.

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5 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

Regarding the origin of the OP object:

This violin has painted purfling, through neck, absence of either blocks or linings, saddle only for the top half of the belly, one might assume that the the bar was originaly carved before someone eradicated it(?), 4 o’clock scroll with delta, beechwood scroll(?)

All of these features are reminicant of the late period of Salzkammergut work. Wheras they made some fine instruments there in the 18thC (e.g. the Gändl Cello I presented recently), the further the 19th C. advanced, the more cheap and hasty the Salzkammergut violins became, to the point that they don‘t really qualify as violins anymore, more toys, or souveniers. This was due to the Vogtländische industrialisierung, where the Markneukirchen dealers sent more and more cheaper and cheaper violins in wheelbarrow loads to the various town fares and markets.As a counter to this, the locals had to get cheaper and cheaper too, to the point where they left whole working steps out (linings for instance). In fact the only thing that speaks against a really cheap and hasty Salzkammergut one, is the veneered finger board, where I would expect a maple one, painted black. This crushing price competition lead to the demise of the violin making tradition there, the bitter poverty attracting the working folk to the newly arived tourism.This is perhaps an analogy to American manufacturing industy in times where it is cheaper to buy anything from China.

I think it inconcievable that this is an amatuer work, American or otherwise, rather a work of a wreched violin maker working at maximum speed with minimum concern for any sort of quality.

Wow! How many do you think they could crank out per day, per person?

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

 

 

Regarding the origin of the OP object:

 

This violin has painted purfling, through neck, absence of either blocks or linings, saddle only for the top half of the belly, one might assume that the the bar was originaly carved before someone eradicated it(?), 4 o’clock scroll with delta, beechwood scroll(?)

 

All of these features are reminicant of the late period of Salzkammergut work. Wheras they made some fine instruments there in the 18thC (e.g. the Gändl Cello I presented recently), the further the 19th C. advanced, the more cheap and hasty the Salzkammergut violins became, to the point that they don‘t really qualify as violins anymore, more toys, or souveniers. This was due to the Vogtländische industrialisierung, where the Markneukirchen dealers sent more and more cheaper and cheaper violins in wheelbarrow loads to the various town fares and markets.As a counter to this, the locals had to get cheaper and cheaper too, to the point where they left whole working steps out (linings for instance). In fact the only thing that speaks against a really cheap and hasty Salzkammergut one, is the veneered finger board, where I would expect a maple one, painted black. This crushing price competition lead to the demise of the violin making tradition there, the bitter poverty attracting the working folk to the newly arived tourism.This is perhaps an analogy to American manufacturing industy in times where it is cheaper to buy anything from China.

I think it inconcievable that this is an amatuer work, American or otherwise, rather a work of a wreched violin maker working at maximum speed with minimum concern for any sort of quality.

Thank you Jacob! So probably a very low quality Salzkammergut late 1800s VSO? Is it at least a decently well preserved example in original condition? Is it unusual to find a 1/4ish sized VSO of this type? What type of sound will this produce with a decent setup?

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On 12/7/2018 at 10:50 AM, BassClef said:

Nice. I'm from the USA so I read total length 11.5" and assumed that was the total.

In addition to being from Canada, which converted to metric shortly after Pierre Trudeau was elected, despite the U.S. being overwhelmingly our main trade partner, I have an M. Sc. in Physics, and so I would be very familiar with the metric system in any event. I am glad that my response turned out to be helpful - and that you have a playable violin.

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On 12/7/2018 at 7:55 PM, Rue said:

p.s.  regarding the glued in sound post, I can see that happening too, someone didn't want to go to the trouble to cut a new one for a violin that wasn't being used, or being used enough.

And regarding grandpas...mine made me a bed for my Barbie.  My Dad refused to buy me Barbie accessories, so Opa made me a bed using the wood from an orange crate, and two of my Tantes made bedding for it.

Hi Rue - in Afrikaans

Opa (sp): Oupa = Grandfather (Ou = old, Pa = father)

Tantes (sp): formal -  Tante = Aunt (singular), Tante = Aunts (plural);   familiar - Tannie (sing), Tannies (plu)

cheers edi

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Would anyone reading go so far as to set this up and bring it into playing condition? The fingerboard has so much craquelure that it would have to surely be planed or replaced for this instrument to "work" and I would be hesitant to alter it since a new fingerboard on this rustic object might just be too out of place. Forever alone as a wallhanger or fix it and bring it into playing condition, that's the question. My son, now 3.5, has just started violin lessons so it might have a chance to be played if I can get it up and running. I can just see the look on his teacher's face if he shows up with this one day haha.

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Why is that Popeye image so big? Lol.

Seriously though, you can try to make it playable. For those first few lessons where they're learning how to hold a violin and bow it would do.

But I think it's best left as a wall hanger. It looks very cheaply made to begin with and I don't think age has improved it.

Don't you have a stable of "better" fractionals?

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Remember, this is a 1/4-1/2 sized thing, so he cannot start on this, it's too big. Is there no chance this can sound decent if fixed up? haha, come one, someone here must have put something like this into playing condition. It's so grotesque that it's almost cool. Imagine it sounded nice, the inside of the body is clean enough...

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