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Ernest Martel

Shell Figured Maple...

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On 11/2/2018 at 8:11 PM, lpr5184 said:

I didn’t realize that Bosnian maple was a species...

According to Wikipedia Bosnian maple is Acer platanoides also known as Norway maple...Thanks Michael!

I wouldn't trust that article too much....

There are both acer pseudoplatanus (common "sycamore" maple) and acer platanoides ("Norway" maple) growing around most parts of europe (including Bosna), the a. pseudoplatanus being by far the most common in deep forests and typically bigger tree and most often cut for violin wood. The a. platanoides (and much less widespread a. campestre a.k.a. "field maple" or "oppio") is rarely seen as tonewood (and for most woodworkers hardly distinguishable).

I've seen hints of quilt and blister/bubble in EU maple (a. pseudoplatanus and campestre mostly) but so far nothing as strong as best quilt of US bigleaf or bubble of sugar maple. But some European ash (fraxinus excelsior) can beat azz of bigleaf with brutal quilt sometimes combined with burl and birdseye all-in-one accentuated by the pores of ash.

Of Norway maple I've only seen pretty straight less wide regulrar curly pattern. The broad angled curl is typical of a. pseudoplatanus.

 

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1 hour ago, HoGo said:

I wouldn't trust that article too much....

There are both acer pseudoplatanus (common "sycamore" maple) and acer platanoides ("Norway" maple) growing around most parts of europe (including Bosna), the a. pseudoplatanus being by far the most common in deep forests and typically bigger tree and most often cut for violin wood. The a. platanoides (and much less widespread a. campestre a.k.a. "field maple" or "oppio") is rarely seen as tonewood (and for most woodworkers hardly distinguishable).

I've seen hints of quilt and blister/bubble in EU maple (a. pseudoplatanus and campestre mostly) but so far nothing as strong as best quilt of US bigleaf or bubble of sugar maple. But some European ash (fraxinus excelsior) can beat azz of bigleaf with brutal quilt sometimes combined with burl and birdseye all-in-one accentuated by the pores of ash.

Of Norway maple I've only seen pretty straight less wide regulrar curly pattern. The broad angled curl is typical of a. pseudoplatanus.

 

 

I checked the wood data base website and it has listings for Norway (Acer platanoides), Field (Acer campestre) and Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) maples but has no listing for a Bosian maple.

https://www.wood-database.com/?s=maples

Interesting...So then, most Bosian maple that is sold as tonewood  is actually Sycamore maple?

Just curious...Is there a way to tell which tree the shell maple billets I have are from? I guess it really doesn't matter since all three are very close in hardness on the Janka  scale.

Would love to see photos of the European ash (fraxinus excelsior) you described. Have you used it on any of your mandos?

Thanks HoGo!

 

 

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13 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

Just curious...Is there a way to tell which tree the shell maple billets I have are from? I guess it really doesn't matter since all three are very close in hardness on the Janka  scale.

Would love to see photos of the European ash (fraxinus excelsior) you described. Have you used it on any of your mandos? 

I would like to know way to tell them as well, but since 99% of maple lumber around is a. pseudoplatanus. a. platanoides is rare in mountain forests (mostly around parks and lowlands) and and a. campestre is typically too small or bent or full of defects to produce commercial lumber. I would have to take samples myself...  I have some wooden toys made by wife's cousin that are maple but look a bit different from a pseudoplatanus (less white lustre, more apparent growth rings and medullaries are smaller) but I have no idea which one it is...

The quilted ash is VERY rare and sought after for luxury furniture, I've seen it mostly in historical cabinets and drawers. Looks great when framed with walnut burl. I haven't had the luck to spot the tree in person (yet), but I know of one nice curly ash near our weekend house growing right at borderline with the Czech Republic. Spotting "interesting" trees in forests is my hobby, but I wouldn't cut them down, I would be more interested in planting them around for future. You would be surprised how many (slightly) different kinds of curly/burly/quilty figure there are in various species (willow, oaks, alder, aspen, birch, cherry, apple and even spruce).

 

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Yes, those are called hand-rubbed sunbursts (even though Ellis probably sprays it) and it is the expected finish on mandolins. I believe Tom uses Tru-oil as his finish.

Traditionally Amber, medium brown and dark brown dyes are used on bare wood. Applied quickly with wet rag and blended while still wet. It's hard to do without some unevenness and many makers use airbrush or spraygun to touch up the result. Some spray the burst completely and it gives a bit diffeerent  look, the dye sits closer to surface and is less transparent. Contrary to common belief this doesn't kill the light reflection in curly maple unless you go way too dark (some folks use black dye to curly maple and sand back so just the endgrain is darkened - that does kill the look)

SOem manufacturers use tinted lacquer for sunburst and that looks completely different.

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The wood has finally arrived from Croatia and looks old enough to be used right away but I'll let it season awhile longer.

Specific gravity is .612 and the seller informed me that it is from the Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) maple tree.

Only problem is the boards did not have any extra wood. The seller has another back and is looking for some neck and rib wood for me.

I thought perhaps using birdseye maple might  be a good substitute.

Does anyone in MN land have any shell figure maple I could buy and use for  neck and ribs? 

 

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On 11/19/2018 at 12:33 PM, lpr5184 said:

The wood has finally arrived from Croatia and looks old enough to be used right away but I'll let it season awhile longer.

Specific gravity is .612 and the seller informed me that it is from the Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) maple tree.

Only problem is the boards did not have any extra wood. The seller has another back and is looking for some neck and rib wood for me.

I thought perhaps using birdseye maple might  be a good substitute.

Does anyone in MN land have any shell figure maple I could buy and use for  neck and ribs? 

 

Call me next week.

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On 11/19/2018 at 6:33 PM, lpr5184 said:

Does anyone in MN land have any shell figure maple I could buy and use for  neck and ribs? 

Isn't it in slab form? You could slice wedge shaped pieces off the sides of the slab to make ribs if you have access to large bandsaw or you are good enough with hand-resawing.

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24 minutes ago, HoGo said:

Isn't it in slab form? You could slice wedge shaped pieces off the sides of the slab to make ribs if you have access to large bandsaw or you are good enough with hand-resawing.

Yes it is and that normally works but the billets are not wide and thick enough.

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On ‎11‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 9:33 AM, lpr5184 said:

The wood has finally arrived from Croatia and looks old enough to be used right away but I'll let it season awhile longer.

Specific gravity is .612 and the seller informed me that it is from the Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) maple tree.

Only problem is the boards did not have any extra wood. The seller has another back and is looking for some neck and rib wood for me.

I thought perhaps using birdseye maple might  be a good substitute.

Does anyone in MN land have any shell figure maple I could buy and use for  neck and ribs? 

 

 

On ‎11‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 4:04 PM, joerobson said:

Call me next week.

Sorry for not calling Joe. The wood dealer contacted me... he found a thick billet of shell maple, enough for necks and ribs, so I'm good to go... But Thank you.

51876821_ShellMapleBillet.jpg.30e55f422de1d6d2c2337732ceea001e.jpg

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