Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

NYC Contemporary Violin and Bow Makers - Reed Yeboah Violins


scordatura
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 126
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

On 10/30/2018 at 4:53 PM, not telling said:

Is it becoming a trend to darken flames so much that the flames are burnt? Maybe it is a trick of the photography, but it appears to be true. It's not a Cremonese feature, and I wonder who would have come up with such an idea. 

Elsewhere online a maker advised someone to burn the flames more than they were comfortable doing during grounding. This was advice passed to him from Prier, which was confusing (to me) and I wonder if that is actually advice in line with some sort of trend that is now being seen at higher levels.

This would be very helpful information to have. Anyone who was there care to answer?

 

What do you mean by darkening flames so much that they appear burnt? Can you describe the process you are asking about?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/30/2018 at 6:00 PM, DoorMouse said:

It's interesting that the ff's on Causse's instrument look more typical of Gasparo's fellow Brescian maker, Zanetto, than his own typical style. 

It's possible that Mr. Coquet's viola is based on a Zanetto.  
Here's a comparison of ff's.. 

ZanFF.thumb.png.4ea2ac5f449d858dedcd36f2ad36da7b.png

 

Nice catch. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/1/2018 at 10:15 AM, Ken_N said:

Well, it certainly is nice to see instruments with character, and not the bowling ball smooth, guitar shine finish that I usually see at shops. (Especially since I can't get that!)  Very nice. I really like the ones that stand out. There were many that stood out to me.  I'm not much of a conformist. 

But now I have to make a folder, slide pictures over, label them, write down what I like and don't like, and spend a lot of time working on, and thinking about how I have to think about everything I'm doing.  Think about it?

Thanks.

Ken

Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, BassClef said:

Thank you for this. I will take some time to compare and study. Are these the two most glaring examples of copying in this series?

I wouldn't say so...I'm just used to seeing what are common models modern makers use.  The light orange-brown varnish and unique ff holes (a healthy amount of tilt) always make me think Messiah...especially on such a clean instrument.  With regards to late del Gesu models (there's at least one more I can't decide which fiddle specifically it was made on in the photos) certain things just seem so familiar.  Like the ff holes on the Lord Wilton.  Or the massive scroll on the Cannone...big things that come across well in the usual angels of photography.  I think a lot of corners and edge work are unique too.  I personally love studying del Gesu instruments...so it's pretty fun to look at what new makers are doing and see that style coming through...it's pretty exciting to me to see something like a Leduc model...great to see an Ole Bull in there!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, BassClef said:

What do you mean by darkening flames so much that they appear burnt? Can you describe the process you are asking about?

I hope I'm not speaking out of turn...but I'm having some morning coffee and can't resist talking about wood finishing :ph34r:

Basically it's chatoyance vs. contrast.  If you just darken figured wood with colorant before it's well sealed, the open grains will get very dark and the piece will have a lot of contrast in a still photo, or just looking at it without moving it around.

If you seal up a piece of figured wood with a more transparent finish that bounces the light around a lot, the end result should be the dancing in the light effect (as long as you don't "kill" the flame with heavy dead-colors on top of it)

Lots of amazing instruments almost seem like one of those hidden 3-d image posters that were popular in the 90s (I think there's a Seinfeld where Elayne has a boss that goes mad trying to find the spaceship in one such poster).  Not with hidden images, but so much depth to the wood it really does seem 3-d when you look into it and move it just a bit.

I've seen a lot of modern instruments that seem to really have both things going for them.  There are ways to raise the contrast of a piece of figured wood without losing much noticeable chatoyance.  UV light seems to be fantastic for that...or working in a bit of more exciting color from resins at the start.

Cheers

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Matthew Hannafin said:

I wouldn't say so...I'm just used to seeing what are common models modern makers use.  The light orange-brown varnish and unique ff holes (a healthy amount of tilt) always make me think Messiah...especially on such a clean instrument.  With regards to late del Gesu models (there's at least one more I can't decide which fiddle specifically it was made on in the photos) certain things just seem so familiar.  Like the ff holes on the Lord Wilton.  Or the massive scroll on the Cannone...big things that come across well in the usual angels of photography.  I think a lot of corners and edge work are unique too.  I personally love studying del Gesu instruments...so it's pretty fun to look at what new makers are doing and see that style coming through...it's pretty exciting to me to see something like a Leduc model...great to see an Ole Bull in there!

Nice. I’m not yet recognizing any patterns so this is all helpful for my basic education. Is there an Ole Bull I this series or are you talking generally?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Matthew Hannafin said:

I hope I'm not speaking out of turn...but I'm having some morning coffee and can't resist talking about wood finishing :ph34r:

Basically it's chatoyance vs. contrast.  If you just darken figured wood with colorant before it's well sealed, the open grains will get very dark and the piece will have a lot of contrast in a still photo, or just looking at it without moving it around.

If you seal up a piece of figured wood with a more transparent finish that bounces the light around a lot, the end result should be the dancing in the light effect (as long as you don't "kill" the flame with heavy dead-colors on top of it)

Lots of amazing instruments almost seem like one of those hidden 3-d image posters that were popular in the 90s (I think there's a Seinfeld where Elayne has a boss that goes mad trying to find the spaceship in one such poster).  Not with hidden images, but so much depth to the wood it really does seem 3-d when you look into it and move it just a bit.

I've seen a lot of modern instruments that seem to really have both things going for them.  There are ways to raise the contrast of a piece of figured wood without losing much noticeable chatoyance.  UV light seems to be fantastic for that...or working in a bit of more exciting color from resins at the start.

Cheers

Matt

Thanks a lot for this description. So more colorant = more contrast = burnt look that doesn’t dance under the light? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, BassClef said:

Do you mean that you have inside info? 

I believe this is the fiddle Joe Thrift started finishing at his workshop this summer.  The back grain pattern is rather distinctive and I remember talking about it.  

Shameless advertising: Joe wants next summers workshop to build the Lord Wilton from nothing to complete in the white in two weeks if there is enough interest.  

-Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/30/2018 at 10:00 PM, DoorMouse said:

It's interesting that the ff's on Causse's instrument look more typical of Gasparo's fellow Brescian maker, Zanetto, than his own typical style. 

It's possible that Mr. Coquet's viola is based on a Zanetto.  
Here's a comparison of ff's.. 

ZanFF.thumb.png.4ea2ac5f449d858dedcd36f2ad36da7b.png

 

Yes, it´s possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/28/2018 at 5:09 PM, scordatura said:

Spent some time at the NYC Contemporary Violin and Bow Makers presented by Reed Yeboah Violins today. Very fun to play around 30 violins, 6 or 8 violas and an assortment of bows. Julie Reed Yeboah was very nice and helpful. As with many of of these events it can get hard to hear when many instruments were being played at once. You could go into rooms to have more privacy. It is really nice to be able to play that many instruments at one time. In general the level was high in terms of craftsmanship and tone. I missed the American Federation of Violin and Bow Makers exhibit in March 2018. I got the feeling that the level of instruments may have been a bit more choice at the AFVBM event. I got to meet Joe Thrift and talked about possibly attending his workshop next year!

One disappointment was the inability to play Joe Curtain's violin. It was not out when I arrived and came back for 10 seconds and then disappeared again to not return. I saw Joe and asked him what was up and he said "someone is coming to play the violin". 

I was particularly impressed with the sound and playability with the following makers (yes just one person's humble opinion)

Eduard Miller - absolutely outstanding E and A string. Very open and loud with quality. Curious to hear with the soundpost a hair more to the bass side. Another player agreed with me that it was the top or one of the top violins.

Isabelle Wilbaux - very nice violin and viola. Rich slightly dark sound with a good cushion to the sound that allowed you to dig in like many GDG fiddles. Very balanced across the strings. Viola was my favorite viola.

Benjamin Ruth - very nice sound and craftsmanship with tasteful antiquing.

Stephen Quinney - nice sound and workmanship

Ada Quaranta - nice sound and workmanship

Noemie Viaud - nice sound and workmanship

There were many interesting bows that for the most part did not follow the norm as far as head design.

There is one more day to test drive these  beauties!

I agree on Eddy Millers’ violins.  We just sold a fiddle of his to a symphony member here in town and it’s one of the best sounding fiddles I’ve heard.  She had been looking for a couple of years and played a lot of really nice stuff too.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Matthew Noykos said:

I agree on Eddy Millers’ violins.  We just sold a fiddle of his to a symphony member here in town and it’s one of the best sounding fiddles I’ve heard.  She had been looking for a couple of years and played a lot of really nice stuff too.  

Wow finally got some respect on MN. Enjoy it while it lasts :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/29/2018 at 2:10 PM, BassClef said:

Luiz Amorim

Violin

contemporary-violin-and-bow-124-makers-exhibition-10-29-2018.JPG

contemporary-violin-and-bow-125-makers-exhibition-10-29-2018.JPG

contemporary-violin-and-bow-126-makers-exhibition-10-29-2018.JPG

contemporary-violin-and-bow-127-makers-exhibition-10-29-2018.JPG

contemporary-violin-and-bow-128-makers-exhibition-10-29-2018.JPG

 

Bassclef, this is the one that I was thinking of when I said nice to see some Ole Bull in there.  I wouldn't say it's trying to be a copy, but probably in that style.  It was already pointed out by scordatura that this one and one other had the elongated ff holes in the Ole Bull/Leduc style.

This instrument looks really nice.  I like the heavy antique look...even have some peg bushings!  The look of going from gouges to varnish brushes gets me every time....well done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/15/2018 at 9:26 AM, BassClef said:

Anything catch your eye? Your comments are always interesting to me.

Ok, that is flattering. I would say that I was definitely interested to see several examples from the only U.S. citizen to place with a gold at Cremona. My personal taste doesn't matter that much, I guess it is just nice to observe the level of instruments in Julie Reed-Yeboah's shop. Even if I don't personally want to see another golden period Strad copy, or another dG copy from any period, good is good. Dont you think this was a great show?

My husband would be interested in stuff like setup and fussy stuff...etc., which sadly can't be observed in photos or by most observers. But there are easy tells...for example, one might put the instruments on their sides and wobble them to check the balance or symmetry. There are some I really liked the looks of, for what it's worth. But who knows, one really has to be there to hear them too. 

I miss New York. There aren't any shows like this in..uhh..Kansas. You are so lucky to be there and just, no big deal, make time in your day to check out the exhibition after seeing on here that it was happening. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haha! I know, that is probably what I said too. That is one thing instrument judges do, among hundreds of measurements or checks. Most of the fussy stuff I would not be able to look for, but I too can wobble a wobbly instrument on the table. I'm also really judgemental in general, so I have that going for me. :mellow:

My husband actually does not care about the instrument wobble thing. At all. He thinks it is terribly Germanic and not useful. But that is something that judges at least used to do, according to Fed members who got in in the 1980's. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...