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Nick Allen

Store bought varnish? I think I've found the right stuff?

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18 minutes ago, Don Noon said:

Wait... you mean that mulling bugs into varnish won't instantly give me a Cremonese-looking result???

You gotta get the bugs out!

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4 hours ago, Michael_Molnar said:

I am confused (again). To the varnish makers in this thread: Are you trying to develop a superb varnish that looks Cremonese (or even better), or are you recreating the Cremonese methods? For example, cochineal is historically valid as a colorant because  it was detected. Fine. But how it was fixed as a pigment in the varnish is just as important if you want an historically valid result. 

 

I doubt we all share exactly the same goals.

For myself, I want to uncover and use Cremona methods as much as possible.  But, one must remember that every feature of classical work seems to show a range of choices in play.  So certain ranges of materials, choices, and patterns of use seem more consistent and stable than the actual specific choices seen on a specific example. In simpler words there isn't one exactly specific method. No one specific  'Old Cremona Method' to exactly follow. But there are 'Old Cremona Methods' to work within.

Further, there are parts to this that we will like never entirely penetrate, and certainly haven't yet.  In those details, historically consistent results, materials, and methods are the refuge.

I also very much suspect that the general patterns and methods of use are more significant than the exact materials and recipe of a component of the process.

 

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20 hours ago, joerobson said:

David,

The materials I use have been available and known since ancient times.  The nature of these materials has not changed.

There is evidence of its use in the ancient rug trade.  As a violin varnish I see the evidence on Golden Period instruments from Stradivari, Bergonzi, and Guadagnini.  I am sure there are others, however I can only speak to what I have seen and examined.

Joe

Hi Joe, thanks for answering.

Of course I did not want to question the historical reliability of your varnish, the materials are there.

It was just a curiosity to be able to investigate the process better, as I think that coloring the oil is one of the possible ways to obtain sufficient color intensity in a little thickness, but until now I have not found anything ancient in this sense.

I will go on looking for evidence again.

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21 hours ago, Michael_Molnar said:

 To the varnish makers in this thread: Are you trying to develop a superb varnish that looks Cremonese (or even better), or are you recreating the Cremonese methods? 

I just want something that will pass the thumb print test everytime after a six to seven week waiting period.  Store bought or made in the backyard doesn't matter, just dry on time baby.

 

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8 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

Hi Joe, thanks for answering.

 
Of course I did not want to question the historical reliability of your varnish, the materials are there.
 

It was just a curiosity to be able to investigate the process better, as I think that coloring the oil is one of the possible ways to obtain sufficient color intensity in a little thickness, but until now I have not found anything ancient in this sense.

 
I will go on looking for evidence again.

David,

The other possibilities being: cochineal carmine [a pigment], cochineal lake fused resin, and cochineal rosinate.  All would agree with Brandmair and Echard, but they do not produce the optics we are looking for.

Joe

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