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6 hours ago, Critical mind said:

But this doesn't give you a guarantee that it sounds the same. Copies are to me just like optical deceptions. They pretend to imitate the sound by the visual aspect, but in reality they don't. Must have been the reason for S.Z. to give up copying.

I don't think that the desired end result of copying is to nail the same sound most of the time. Almost all professional makers are well aware of this. 

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18 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

I don't think that the desired end result of copying is to nail the same sound most of the time. Almost all professional makers are well aware of this. 

To me there are two things: the concept behind the instrument and the visual result. 

While the visual result doesn't have anything to do with the tonal result, or, I doesn't matter if the varnished is antiqued or not, the conceptual points have an enormous impact in how the violin will sound in the end.

So somehow by trying to aim at the same tonal characteristics the visual result should come out similar to the original.

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1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

To me there are two things: the concept behind the instrument and the visual result. 

While the visual result doesn't have anything to do with the tonal result, or, I doesn't matter if the varnished is antiqued or not, the conceptual points have an enormous impact in how the violin will sound in the end.

So somehow by trying to aim at the same tonal characteristics the visual result should come out similar to the original.

So they are linked in some way. Yes. 

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2 hours ago, Rue said:

Nice!

Is that the "real" colour? Or is it showing up lighter?

The 'real' color is a kind of hard to get on a picture. I actually lightened up the brightness to make it look 'more right'. 

If I am lucky there will be sunshine tomorrow to make a shot in natural light.

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1 hour ago, Michael Szyper said:

Very exquisite work - as expected - Andreas! Could you describe the tonal result?

Thanks! 

The tonal result is very satisfying so far. Very even over all strings, very good response and a slightly nasal character as most original DGs. However, over the past 2 weeks it developed from a sort of sounding matt and tired to getting more brilliance and I am still experimenting with 2 different bridges and 2 sound posts to get more sizzle in the sound. It seems the fiddle is at the moment very sensitive to the pressure of the soundpost. 

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19 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

My interpretation of the Ole Bull DG.

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Oh! That's exactly the violin I was thinking of just now (Ole Bull)! Do you happen to have patterns/graduations for the original? ...or useful tips?  :) 

Yours looks beautiful, also! I love the blonde color!   :wub:

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13 hours ago, FoxMitchell said:

Oh! That's exactly the violin I was thinking of just now (Ole Bull)! Do you happen to have patterns/graduations for the original? ...or useful tips?  :) 

Yours looks beautiful, also! I love the blonde color!   :wub:

My guidelines when making it were the Biddulph book and a visit to the Chi Mei foundation where I could 'touch' original. 

Just saying from my memory, the original Ole Bull looks actually even lighter. When I saw it it looked almost as if DG didn't have time to finish it with the last color varnish layer. 

Useful tips? Hmmm, kind of difficult to say because I don't know how you approach making a copy. If you can get hold of the information from the Biddulph book you have almost all you need. I case you are replicating the thicknesses, don't be afraid of leaving them thick. I never replicate the single figures in a book but rather try to catch the general idea. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

My guidelines when making it were the Biddulph book and a visit to the Chi Mei foundation where I could 'touch' original. 

Just saying from my memory, the original Ole Bull looks actually even lighter. When I saw it it looked almost as if DG didn't have time to finish it with the last color varnish layer. 

Useful tips? Hmmm, kind of difficult to say because I don't know how you approach making a copy. If you can get hold of the information from the Biddulph book you have almost all you need. I case you are replicating the thicknesses, don't be afraid of leaving them thick. I never replicate the single figures in a book but rather try to catch the general idea. 

Awesome! ...what is the Biddulph book?

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3 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

My guidelines when making it were the Biddulph book and a visit to the Chi Mei foundation where I could 'touch' original. 

Just saying from my memory, the original Ole Bull looks actually even lighter. When I saw it it looked almost as if DG didn't have time to finish it with the last color varnish layer. 

Useful tips? Hmmm, kind of difficult to say because I don't know how you approach making a copy. If you can get hold of the information from the Biddulph book you have almost all you need. I case you are replicating the thicknesses, don't be afraid of leaving them thick. I never replicate the single figures in a book but rather try to catch the general idea. 

 

 

1

What a wonderful treat. I've had the good fortune to examine instruments at the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian.  Without being permitted to touch, there are things about the channal and eye brow I never would have understood or know to look for in picture reflextions.

-Jim

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5 hours ago, FoxMitchell said:

Awesome! ...what is the Biddulph book?

It is the Bible of Del Gesu books. All gdg from the 94 Exhibition were photographed and documented with all necessary measurements by Mr. Hargrave. 

Nowadays it is  expensive and hard to get. Buying these books was my most difficult violin making related project so far. ;)

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1 hour ago, Michael Szyper said:

It is the Bible of Del Gesu books. All gdg from the 94 Exhibition were photographed and documented with all necessary measurements by Mr. Hargrave. 

Nowadays it is  expensive and hard to get. Buying these books was my most difficult violin making related project so far. ;)

The DG book will be up at Sunrise auctions in Tokyo 

https://www.sunrise-auction.com/schedule.html

I can make another post when the online catalogue is out.

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1 hour ago, Michael Szyper said:

It is the Bible of Del Gesu books. All gdg from the 94 Exhibition were photographed and documented with all necessary measurements by Mr. Hargrave. 

Nowadays it is  expensive and hard to get. Buying these books was my most difficult violin making related project so far. ;)

Is there anything [good] about violins that doesn't end up "expensive and hard to get"?  ;) 

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1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

The DG book will be up at Sunrise auctions in Tokyo 

https://www.sunrise-auction.com/schedule.html

I can make another post when the online catalogue is out.

Thank you for the information, I got it last year already. Pretty good news for the searching guys around here.

 

23 minutes ago, FoxMitchell said:

Is there anything [good] about violins that doesn't end up "expensive and hard to get"?  ;) 

You got the point :) I would strongly recommend to get it, since it is still worth the great effort...Andreas gave a very good hint!

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Michael, 

You can get an Ole Bull plan pdf here. You have to look down the page to the picture that says Mezzo Violin  to find the link.  There are probably other links to it, but that's the first one I found Google.  It is a very good plan.  It's just like a Strad Poster.  I made mine to the thicknesses given.  I like it, but it is American Sycamore, and I put a baroque type fb on it, and when I take fb's off and on, the seam gets very visible.  It has a varnish on it similar to the one the Andres showed here, I wish it looked as good.  The guy I showed it to didn't like it because it was too amateurish.  I think with a better neck/fingerboard it might look better.  

I'd do it again.

http://www.platetuning.org/html/arching_and_thicknesses.html

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After a while now I am making a new post about my new shop with a brandnew self designed bench.

Everything was build with thoughts of work efficiency. So around each seat I have now all the things at hand I need for working. Instead of architect lamps I installed strong Led lights.

The last picture shows the bench seats. Under the lid is are two compartments. One for the garbage and a second for a bigger alcohol canister. At either side there is space for bigger tools like planes, saws, bigger clamps and violin beds which would be taking too much space on the bench. 

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24 minutes ago, JohnCockburn said:

Nice.

Tell us the thinking behind the big bridge kidney on the bass side !

Sure,

for everything on the setup I look on a sort of balance. Sometimes there is a scientific explanation sometimes it is just my home cooked 'recipe'

For the bridge it has actually a bit to do with physics and statics.

Physicists found that the bridge moves in two different patterns. For low frequencies it pivots, or you could say as well it rocks from one side to the other. In high frequencies it bounces up and down. 

Now, I am interested in the rocking motion. Bass side and treble side of the bridge are like two children on a a see-saw. On the treble side sits a heavy child and on the bass side sits a light child. To make the see saw move as smoothly as possible the pivoting point must get closer to the heavier child . Therefore I avoid to cut the ear under the e string as much as possible and take rather wood where it is not needed. Therefore the ear under the G string is bigger. 

Sound comparisons before and after enlarging the ear under the G string almost always showed an improvement for the overall sound on the G string in particular. Something like fuller and deeper or  less restricted. Try it yourself. 

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45 minutes ago, Michael Szyper said:

Love the surface texture, especially of the back!

Thanks, Michael. 

To me a 'copy' with all the ingredients of antique finish but with a completely smooth surface is just like a revarnished Suzuki violin. ^_^

One could argue that when those instruments were new the surface was absolutely even. But I am convinced this was not the case, though it is difficult or impossible to build proof on this matter.

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