Recommended Posts

The trouble with threads such as this one, is that more or less any scroll looks rather pretty, until one sees another one which is obviously prettier. I always have to think of one sentence in Utopia from Sir(Saint) Thomas More, which we had to read in English Literature at school where he writes “every gorilla mother finds her own baby delightfully beautiful” (or words to that effect, I would have to look it up).

 

The only way to learn how to really look at a scroll with every bone in your body, is when one has to make an exact copy for an old violin that doesn't have its original head, or when one has to replace major missing bits.

 

The small 5 String Widhalm viola I posted here https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/339882-5-string-small-widhalm-viola/

a few weeks ago had the cyclops malady, someone having bashed one scroll ear off in some mishap many years ago. Making such a scroll binocular again is one of the jobs I really enjoy,.'cos you really have to study and understand the scroll. I used a bit of wood from my scrap box, a defunct 1746 Leidolff cello neck, which is always a head start, since you don't have to bugger around trying to stain the ground colour of the “new” wood. I otherwise haven’t finished restoring the Widhalm, since I am still researching why it had 5 strings, and other distractions crop up of course.

 

The beautifully carved scroll finishes with what one would in the meaning of this thread describe as a “round” eye. I can't help but say such scrolls can seem to have the feeling that they grew organically, whereas the “square” ones always look (to me) as if some more or less challenged bloke had to carve it.

Foto 2.JPG

Foto 3.JPG

Foto 2.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I can't help but say such scrolls can seem to have the feeling that they grew organically, whereas the “square” ones always look (to me) as if some more or less challenged bloke had to carve it.



 

Perhaps  because the majority of the organic, natural spiral forms, not all though,  has a "rouded apperance". Our perception and brains are expirience based affair. More than often we simply like what we are familiar with.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

The trouble with threads such as this one, is that more or less any scroll looks rather pretty, until one sees another one which is obviously prettier. I always have to think of one sentence in Utopia from Sir(Saint) Thomas More, which we had to read in English Literature at school where he writes “every gorilla mother finds her own baby delightfully beautiful” (or words to that effect, I would have to look it up).

 

The only way to learn how to really look at a scroll with every bone in your body, is when one has to make an exact copy for an old violin that doesn't have its original head, or when one has to replace major missing bits.

 

The small 5 String Widhalm viola I posted here https://maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/339882-5-string-small-widhalm-viola/

a few weeks ago had the cyclops malady, someone having bashed one scroll ear off in some mishap many years ago. Making such a scroll binocular again is one of the jobs I really enjoy,.'cos you really have to study and understand the scroll. I used a bit of wood from my scrap box, a defunct 1746 Leidolff cello neck, which is always a head start, since you don't have to bugger around trying to stain the ground colour of the “new” wood. I otherwise haven’t finished restoring the Widhalm, since I am still researching why it had 5 strings, and other distractions crop up of course.

 

The beautifully carved scroll finishes with what one would in the meaning of this thread describe as a “round” eye. I can't help but say such scrolls can seem to have the feeling that they grew organically, whereas the “square” ones always look (to me) as if some more or less challenged bloke had to carve it.

Foto 2.JPG

Foto 3.JPG

Foto 2.JPG

How did you do that exactly?  Simply said, it’s exemplary!  Did you use fish glue, or hide, or something else?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/2/2018 at 2:29 AM, Landolfi said:

How about this scroll?  Like it?

 

 

C4B33065-1CB7-4A01-8E63-33C54CA9B04B.jpeg

The throat on this particular scroll looks to "open" in my opinion; because of this, it appears gangly and awkward. I think what adds to this view is how the curve tends to flatten out on the top of the scroll, rather than tightening up the radius as it enters the first turn.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, ClefLover said:

How did you do that exactly?  Simply said, it’s exemplary!  Did you use fish glue, or hide, or something else?  

To repair that, I started by making a dental compound negative of the opposite side, on a piece of plywood, so that I would have a nice non-wobbly opposite piece to cramp against. Then I (only) smoothed out the naked wound with a small elliptical cabinet scraper. NB: only smoothed it out, removing the minimum possible original wood. Then I rummaged through my scrap box, looking for wood of the same age, which I found with a bit of old Leidolf cello neck. Then I cut a (rather lager) piece of this repair wood, being really really careful that the wood (annual rings, medulary rays, and growth direction) matched the scroll exactly. Then I chalk fitted the repair part to the gaping wound. Then I glued it, cramping against my dental compound opposite bit with normal hide glue (GEWA catalogue #464.300). I should mention that I always leave glue to dry far longer than any colleague I know, in this case over the weekend. This might be superstitious nonsense on my part (but I don't think so). Then I carved the new blob of wood down to match the opposite side, just like anyone would carve a scroll. Since I had used wood of the same age, I didn't have to potter around with staining it to match, just rubbed some linseed oil on with a rag to give it a surface texture. Then I retouched it with a 50/50 shellac/sanderac varnish, with a teaspoon of elemi in it. The pigment I mixed in were Indian Yellow, alizeron crimson, prussian blue, raw sienna, and a tiny bit of lamp black. Then I sprinkled dirt on it, from the top of my lampshade (out of the reach of my cleaning lady) and blew any excess dirt off. Finished.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ClefLover said:

Do you have a specific brand of elemi that you use?  Do you also use this for your French polishes?

It is my standard retouching varnish:

Take a Ketcheup bottle (yes, sans ketchup:)). Fill the bottom inch with shellac

https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/schellack-lemon-allerfeinst?c=265#

the next inch with sanderac

https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/sandarac-echt-in-traenen

add a teaspoon of elemi

:https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/gummi-elemi?c=266

and pour in about 3 inches of spirit onto that, then wait a few days.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

It is my standard retouching varnish:

Take a Ketcheup bottle (yes, sans ketchup:)). Fill the bottom inch with shellac

https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/schellack-lemon-allerfeinst?c=265#

the next inch with sanderac

https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/sandarac-echt-in-traenen

add a teaspoon of elemi

:https://www.joha.eu/de/harze/naturharze/gummi-elemi?c=266

and pour in about 3 inches of spirit onto that, then wait a few days.

Thank you!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.