catnip

Catnip's (John K) Bench

Recommended Posts

Hi Ernie,  I think I got the Pusch rosewood tailpiece from Dov... but I am not sure.  No, the last picture is not curly cherry.  I will reveal what I think it is if I decide to use it and if I can cut ribs from it.  It has a density of 0.57 gm/cc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, no, no!  You can’t show us a gorgeous piece of wood, and then say you may never tell us what it is. Keep us in suspense, fine. But come on man!:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I was able to slice ribs from the billet so it will be the next violin.   I was told it was Spanish cedar but it is not a cedar and it is not Spanish.  If feels and smells more like mahogany.   Fiqured mahogany has the curl or figure in the wrong direction.  This piece seems to have the curl in the "right" direction. 

Nice to see that Jim is recovering and has not lost his sense of humor.

IMG_0921a.jpg

IMG_0923.JPG

IMG_0924.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More progress with ribs and linings.   Cutting the lower rib overhang.

IMG_0925.thumb.JPG.0f60cc3f7eb77766c7f4ae9e5c444dc5.JPG

I get a tight fit by wetting the inside of the rib with water before fitting and I now use cauls made from large vinly erasers glued to 1/8" plywood backing. 

IMG_0929.thumb.JPG.9a0850953e11444cedfae48035faa64d.JPG

They conform very easily to almost any model since they have more give than the cork lined cauls I used to use.  I needed quite a few different corked cauls to find the best "fit" since I have many different models.

IMG_0952.thumb.JPG.81d8c708e62f161cdea3388fb0765d8b.JPG

Marking the mortice for the C linings and drilling a small pilot hole 2mm diameter and 7 mm deep which makes cutting the slot much easier.IMG_0930.thumb.JPG.a488adfcf80feafd0fca5b3f81e6f5d9.JPG

IMG_0931.thumb.JPG.af609dab040370c278fa7d447de3c797.JPG

  •  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working on the back. Cutting the outline..IMG_0939.thumb.JPG.eed8208afd1a53240a6ede63fabfaca5.JPG

Working on the channel and corners.  This mahogany has a pinkish hue when dry.

IMG_0940.thumb.JPG.c97d8783307991acf6dfa584c1149f36.JPG

Back completed and dampened with alcohol to see the true color of the wood in sunlight and to enhance the figure.

IMG_0945.thumb.JPG.79f8d497ff67aad17988e11279cb6f4f.JPG

Inside grads done with a drill stop set at various depths

IMG_0946.thumb.JPG.96839c618ee6c2c49bf93c0689b8c37a.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back was finished at 115 gm with m5 @ 311 hz which is the ball park with slightly higher thickness in the center area.  I decided to use one of my old spruce billets marked Gewa 1977.  Normally I prefer low to mid density spruce but this billet is extremely tight grained and looked interesting.  It probably has a density over 0.41 gm/cc which I have worked with.  Also  it had a small flaw (resin pocket ) that I thought would disappear after the graduations... but not a big deal.

IMG_0967.thumb.JPG.41ca8dc231e8be05543ea133da2c3dd2.JPG

But last week I got side tracked and had to replace the glass in an old storm window.  It is done now but I am waiting for the putty to dry so it can be painted before I install it.  Also it has been too cold!!   I practiced glass cutting on the old broken glass until I got the hang of it.  I had everything to fix it without going to the hardware store...  not sure if hardware stores were even opened.

IMG_0984.thumb.JPG.b7aed560ffabdd68ffd6d6bc1d344204.JPG

Primed and ready for final exterior coat after the putty dries a bit more

IMG_0985a.thumb.jpg.14e0eab4922c210656d17f3d6ac150e6.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

F-hole placement.  I use a scribe to pinpoint the hole location then a 1.5 mm pen drill first followed by a 2.3 mm pen drill then the f-hole cutter.  I also draw parallel lines which extend all the way to the top to verify the vertical alignment of the f-holes in case I have to make any small adjustmentsIMG_0989a.thumb.jpg.09c181ada75c060d8c5b58ed8f96338e.jpg

IMG_0991.thumb.JPG.371ad9e40f1ebc30ebfb52c0ef2ff84e.JPG

IMG_0993.thumb.JPG.cb37c97102465de2ee459458fd8f7c8d.JPG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vinyl erasers are more flexible than cork... Just don't over tighten them.  F holes are done for now but they are not exact copies of Strad f-holes... more what I like. And there is still some more refinement to be done.. for me it is an iterative process which I revisit with fresh eyes after a day or two.  The resin pocket is still there and adds a bit of character... hopefully it will be minimized when I color match the top the back.IMG_1026.thumb.JPG.82493df63e83e461e6893815a6253845.JPG

Now it is on to the scroll.  I found some Manitoba maple that had similar wide flame and grain as the Spanish cedar (Mahogany) and can be easily color matched to the back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought those on a clearance sale from Staples.  These novelty large multi-striped vinyl erasers are for "big" mistakes.  Not popular with school kids but I saw a purpose for them.  You could also check the dollar stores if they are open.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/30/2020 at 9:12 AM, catnip said:

More progress with ribs and linings.   Cutting the lower rib overhang.

 

I get a tight fit by wetting the inside of the rib with water before fitting and I now use cauls made from large vinly erasers glued to 1/8" plywood backing. 

 

They conform very easily to almost any model since they have more give than the cork lined cauls I used to use.  I needed quite a few different corked cauls to find the best "fit" since I have many different models.

IMG_0952.thumb.JPG.81d8c708e62f161cdea3388fb0765d8b.JPG

Marking the mortice for the C linings and drilling a small pilot hole 2mm diameter and 7 mm deep which makes cutting the slot much easier.IMG_0930.thumb.JPG.a488adfcf80feafd0fca5b3f81e6f5d9.JPG

IMG_0931.thumb.JPG.af609dab040370c278fa7d447de3c797.JPG

  •  

 

 

You are full of all sorts of great ideas,,,,

The erasers have possibilities,,,

What did you use for glue?

Contact,, double stick carpet tape?

 

Here are some big ones,, 7x4.5x1 inch

https://www.amazon.com/Emraw-Pencil-Eraser-Rubber-School/dp/B07CH194JV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used contact cement for the vinyl erasers.

I had a thick block of Manitoba Maple that was too small for a back.  But it needed to be cut on the quarter for a neck.  I ended up with block that was wide enough for two necks.  I used my two neck template.

IMG_0994.thumb.JPG.aad8947ef32acbdb4f728c28a1343332.JPG

Again I find this the easiest way to scribe a center line.

IMG_1000.thumb.JPG.22225a44112650972bb5c2e93c09c4c9.JPG

Red line is my cut line that takes into account the larger pegbox width at the bottom (chin area)

IMG_1005.thumb.JPG.c4ddad8d00290e2d02f4c6a913d01d49.JPG

Cut the outline of the complete first turn ... thanks to watching D Sora video.

IMG_1006.thumb.JPG.050a4fa7c76af053d97a7fdbd0c59e4d.JPG

Drilling deep into the throat using a depth stop.  It makes carving the deep pocket for the A string a bit easier

IMG_1017.thumb.JPG.cd20831f9b8d107603ec432c0602bcd2.JPG

Here is the result.  I like to do the pegbox before doing the fluting.  Also you can see the cut line deep in the throat which was done with a knife.

IMG_1018.thumb.JPG.a946c230f57bf70ba468f7d501efbd19.JPG

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First step of fluting the f-hole.  I lowered the outside edge to be more or less parallel to the inside edge.

IMG_1024.thumb.JPG.9559822a5f849daa02f79237b698343a.JPG

With the bass bar finished the top came in at 75 gm with grad thicknesses of 2.4 mm in the upper bouts, 2.4 mm in the lower bouts, central area of 2.9 mm, 3.0+ mm for the f-hole areas and sound post.

IMG_1027.thumb.JPG.597cabf455545a586d92ddc984b513d2.JPG

After temporarily gluing the fb I drill a locating pin hole for a small finishing nail.  This makes gluing the fb so much easier after varnishing.  The fb only has 1 degree of freedom.  The pin is always removed and the nut will hide the pin hole.IMG_1041.thumb.JPG.7cc643b09991b2242df081001d26afe5.JPG

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, catnip said:

First step of fluting the f-hole.  I lowered the outside edge to be more or less parallel to the inside edge.

IMG_1024.thumb.JPG.9559822a5f849daa02f79237b698343a.JPG

With the bass bar finished the top came in at 75 gm with grad thicknesses of 2.4 mm in the upper bouts, 2.4 mm in the lower bouts, central area of 2.9 mm, 3.0+ mm for the f-hole areas and sound post.

IMG_1027.thumb.JPG.597cabf455545a586d92ddc984b513d2.JPG

After temporarily gluing the fb I drill a locating pin hole for a small finishing nail.  This makes gluing the fb so much easier after varnishing.  The fb only has 1 degree of freedom.  The pin is always removed and the nut will hide the pin hole.IMG_1041.thumb.JPG.7cc643b09991b2242df081001d26afe5.JPG

 

 

 

 

Nice. I used to use that method for making guitars. But I would nail a finishing nail into the neck, cut it off with some end nippers, leaving a small bit exposed. Then I'd compress the board onto the neck, pushing the nail into the board. I'd have one at opposite corners, btw. 

The only real difference is that I just left the nails in. One would want to seriously avoid this for violins, though, as a residual nail would cause headaches for anyone planing the neck later on. With electric guitars, it's mostly power tools involved, so the little finishing nails aren't as much of an issue. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

        When I first started making violins I researched this website for "jigs" that make re-gluing a fingerboard easier.  There were many suggestions and this seemed the simplest.  I just want to eliminate the fingerboard from pivoting at the nut when you align it at the root.  Looks like we do share some ideas from guitar makers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat sanding the heel.  This method allows me more control in lowering the neck into its final position.  When it fits I clean it up with a scraper.IMG_1047.thumb.JPG.b373485fcbdf20a52e6bc6735abbd95b.JPG

Aligning the neck with a temp bridge and a center line drawn on the fingerboardIMG_1048a.thumb.jpg.c84337bd1084a1f5a6450b15221cc435.jpg

Marking the extension of the fingerboard with a half pencil.  I used a bandsaw to cut it in half.

IMG_1061a.thumb.jpg.fdf1f34a12affcdf7b85133d07053adb.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter Westerlund, a Swedish violin maker is sharing how he is making his 400 th violin from A-Z . When I first started I found his site very useful.  He posted pictures from his workbench for each violin he made.  I copied some of his useful jigs.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.