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I finally made some spool clamps.  I wanted them to clamp over the ribs, not the edges.  I wanted the bottoms to be tall enough so the violin would sit on the clamps, and not rock.  I used leather and knurled brass nuts as suggested. I put a 3/4 flat on the top with a spade drill, and the washer fits right in it.  I can wax it to eliminate spin.  I should have bought longer bolts!  One of those engineering changes.  But they work.  I made 24 of them.  14 are concave.  2, for the c bouts are very slightly convex.  4 are convex, and 4 are very convex for tight corners, like the upper and lower bout ends of this Gofriller model.  

I noticed in the video with John Dilworth he used the clamps that I thought of before.  Herdim assembly clamps. 

It takes a long time. I just used softwood dowels. 

20180826_112756.thumb.jpg.baee13a9a2cd10a8fa39d1115afc1335.jpg

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Edi,

Believe it or not, the back was sent to be ribs for another two piece back.  In transit, it went from Washington in terrible weather, to the Detroit Metro area.  And then it went 200 miles the wrong way to Grand Rapids.  When it arrived, a week later,  it looked like it fell off the truck several times into snow banks and water puddles.  It was taped up, and one half of the back was missing.  I used the rib piece instead.  

I like the model.  I'm making 3 of them, of different woods, and different arching heights, but the same archings, profile, asymmetry, and string angles.   Paradox Walnut/Yellow Cedar, Koa/Englemann.  This is Big Leaf and Sitka.  They seem to work well.  The others should be fun.

How'd you know that there was a story?

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12 hours ago, Ken_N said:

Edi,

Believe it or not, the back was sent to be ribs for another two piece back.  In transit, it went from Washington in terrible weather, to the Detroit Metro area.  And then it went 200 miles the wrong way to Grand Rapids.  When it arrived, a week later,  it looked like it fell off the truck several times into snow banks and water puddles.  

- snip -

How'd you know that there was a story?

Hi Ken_N - the pattern in the wood just screamed about the ups and downs of life - the reality matched the look. I hope it sings most beautifully.

cheers edi

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Beautiful job! New hand-made clamps with nice clean threads! A luxury!

I was gifted a box of 50+ clamps and finally had enough of the old stubborn threads. Disassembled every one and threaded an Irwin die-head along the shaft. With a shot of silicone spray to lube the cutter head and protect the new metal.

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17 hours ago, Woodman said:

Beautiful job! New hand-made clamps with nice clean threads! A luxury!

I was gifted a box of 50+ clamps and finally had enough of the old stubborn threads. Disassembled every one and threaded an Irwin die-head along the shaft. With a shot of silicone spray to lube the cutter head and protect the new metal.

I would be careful with the silicon spray. If that stuff makes it's way onto  your violin wood, it's bad, bad news.

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5 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

I would be careful with the silicon spray. If that stuff makes it's way onto  your violin wood, it's bad, bad news.

Thanks, I figured it'd act as a solvent. I'd spray into a rag, run the die head cutter up the threads to straighten them out and cut off embedded glue, then give a good wipe before reassembling the spool. Arduous work. "Free" clamps come at a price.

Silicone and Cutters bug spray. At the outdoor music jams, any bug spraying was done far from the music players, and always downwind.

 

irwin-threading-tools-3.jpg

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13 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

Nice bigleaf back Ken. Where did you buy it?

Yeah E, it has a nice feel too.  I scrounge wood for necks, and bought some wood for backs locally, or on vacation; but most of my wood comes from Bruce at Orcas Island Tonewood. Quartered spruce is hard to find in a regular woodworkers store.  Craig Tucker recommended him,  and since I've only used Englemann and Sitka I'm blissfully ignorant of what I could be using. The specials pages are cool, with lots of goodies.   If I ever got hold of some good European Alpine spruce that might change, but I don't know where I'd go to get it.

The one time I used Red Spruce it seemed very good, but the wood was VERY prone to splitting.  Left a bad taste in my mouth. 

Ken

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4 hours ago, Woodman said:

Thanks, I figured it'd act as a solvent. I'd spray into a rag, run the die head cutter up the threads to straighten them out and cut off embedded glue, then give a good wipe before reassembling the spool. Arduous work. "Free" clamps come at a price.

Silicone and Cutters bug spray. At the outdoor music jams, any bug spraying was done far from the music players, and always downwind.

If any silicon makes it's way onto raw wood, you'll have nothing but problems when varnishing.

I would have removed the upper spool and chased the threads with a little bit of bee wax rubbed onto the threads for lubrication, and then put the spool back on when finished.

 

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