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Fitting tool handles

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First time buying tools and handles separately.

Any advice on how to bring them together? Heat? Glue? Bigger hammer?

 

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Hammering the handle is the best way. Sometimes thin super glue works fine. But metal and wood is too difficult to hold together with glue. Also, if you heat the tool for any reason and you have used glue at the handle, it will melt. So hammer is the best way.

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Holding the working end of the tool with a towel or oven mitt, heat the tang until it starts to glow red.  Then, still protecting the hand holding the tool,  insert the tang in the tool handle, rest the end of the tool on the bench,  and gently hammer the handle end to further embed the tang in the wood.  The wood should smoke if the tang is hot enough.  This method better enables the wood to take the shape of the tang.

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1 hour ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Holding the working end of the tool with a towel or oven mitt, heat the tang until it starts to glow red.  Then, still protecting the hand holding the tool,  insert the tang in the tool handle, rest the end of the tool on the bench,  and gently hammer the handle end to further embed the tang in the wood.  The wood should smoke if the tang is hot enough.  This method better enables the wood to take the shape of the tang.

I think that this entails a too high risk of de-hardening the steel of your tools, especially with small gouges with little mass.

I prefer to make the hole of the appropriate size in the handle and hammer it, if the hole is too little the risk of splitting it is high too.

Of course the system you indicate works, but you need a very powerful and concentrated heat source (blowtorch) to avoid overheating the hardened part of the tool (not to try with Japanese laminated steel...)

 

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The usual way to snug a file onto a handle is to hold the tool vertically by the handle, file up and handle down, and rapidly bring it straight down onto a solid surface so that the surface stops the handle and inertia drives the file tang deeper into the handle. Having said that, there's no real reason why the file's tang needs to be any deeper than yours is now, as long as it's stable.

I'm certain that the maker of your beautiful rasp would cringe at the prospect of someone heating it up as was recommended here. You'll just damage the tools temper, which extends into the tang too, though it's not as hard as the cutting part.

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2 hours ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Holding the working end of the tool with a towel or oven mitt, heat the tang until it starts to glow red.  Then, still protecting the hand holding the tool,  insert the tang in the tool handle, rest the end of the tool on the bench,  and gently hammer the handle end to further embed the tang in the wood.  The wood should smoke if the tang is hot enough.  This method better enables the wood to take the shape of the tang.

No need to see red,  just check now and again for a curl of smoke.wrapping a wet towel around the smart end of the tool will control the temper. Also important is to remove the shank before compleatly seating the tool so as to have some room for compression, similar to fitting pegs long with the reamer. That said, less is more and if it ain’t baroque...don,t fix it.

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6 minutes ago, MANFIO said:

I prefer using my rasps and files without handles.

That,s a good point, and something talked about with other makers,the extra leverage of the handle seems to somewhat interferes with gaining a feel with the tool, good for metal work , not so good on wood.

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17 minutes ago, James M. Jones said:

That,s a good point, and something talked about with other makers,the extra leverage of the handle seems to somewhat interferes with gaining a feel with the tool, good for metal work , not so good on wood.

Yes, we are working with small pieces, I feel I have more control over my rasps and files without the handle. My father and grandfather did the same. 

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The tang is usually annealed steel. File 3 or 4 shallow grooves around the tang spaced maybe a 1/4" apart from each other. Drill a hole in the handle with a bit slightly larger than the tang measures at the tip, followed by a slightly larger bits to create a stepped, tapered hole. Mix up some good quality epoxy and work it into the hole, and coat the tang with epoxy too. Insert the tang into the handle and tap it home until it's snug in the hole;  wipe away any extra epoxy and let it cure.

I've never had a handle work loose done in this manner. The handle can be removed by splitting it open, and the old epoxy can easily be removed with a wire brush wheel.

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1 hour ago, MANFIO said:

I prefer using my rasps and files without handles.

Me too, I have the impression that with the handle they do not have the right balance.

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I prefer to chemically clean the tangs of my tools scheduled to have handles; I then use a slow setting epoxy(when I am not in a hurry); otherwise, I use a fast-setting epoxy. Never had one come loose!

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You can heat the tang of your rasp without any danger of softening the teeth by wrapping the toothed part in a wet cloth.

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