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Stupid violinist questions

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5 hours ago, Emilg said:

but they do, however the protection comes mostly from the binding..

purflingdetail1.gif

Let me restate the question a little differently:  If the violin plate overhang and purfling design is so good why don't guitars use it?

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15 minutes ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

Let me restate the question a little differently:  If the violin plate overhang and purfling design is so good why don't guitars use it?

Because guitars are played vertically, held against the body. Nobody wants chafing on arms, legs, or ahem, torsos. Different technique. 

Check out the early history of Fender. The Telecaster is a great design but the edge of the body where the right arm rests is uncomfortable for most and generated a lot of complaints, hence the Stratocaster!

 

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41 minutes ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

Let me restate the question a little differently:  If the violin plate overhang and purfling design is so good why don't guitars use it?

Try to hold your arm over an overstanding edge (or even two) for more than 20 minutes and it will be very clear why there are no overhangs in guitars.

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53 minutes ago, Michael Szyper said:

Try to hold your arm over an overstanding edge (or even two) for more than 20 minutes and it will be very clear why there are no overhangs in guitars.

I'll try inverting the question:  If guitars don't seem to have plate edge fragility problems why aren't violins made that way too?

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53 minutes ago, Michael Szyper said:

Try to hold your arm over an overstanding edge (or even two) for more than 20 minutes and it will be very clear why there are no overhangs in guitars.

I don't think that's quite it: The binding on a classical guitar makes a sharper corner, if anything, than the rounded overhang on a violin.  Back when I played classical guitar, I think it was the way the guitar was held, between the player's legs, that avoided discomfort due to the edge cutting in to my arm.  For other acoustic guitar styles, the edge can get uncomfortable.  The edge of a Fender Telecaster can be uncomfy, but it's still less sharp than the rounded edge of a violin.  I think the answer is simply that guitars and violins evolved separately with differing methods of construction. 

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20 minutes ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

I'll try inverting the question:  If guitars don't seem to have plate edge fragility problems why aren't violins made that way too?

So Kids won't confuse one with the other, and commit social suicide by accidentally playing the violin? :D

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17 minutes ago, phutatorius said:

I think the answer is simply that guitars and violins evolved separately with differing methods of construction. 

Obviously, the Italian Renaissance geniuses who invented the violin presciently foresaw the need for overhangs to facilitate the attachment of chin and shoulder rests.  :ph34r::lol:

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6 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Obviously, the Italian Renaissance geniuses who invented the violin presciently foresaw the need for overhangs to facilitate the attachment of chin and shoulder rests.  :ph34r::lol:

Like.

On a serious note, makes them easier to work on. I'll never forget the first time I had to reassemble a gamba...

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9 hours ago, phutatorius said:

I don't think that's quite it: The binding on a classical guitar makes a sharper corner, if anything, than the rounded overhang on a violin.  Back when I played classical guitar, I think it was the way the guitar was held, between the player's legs, that avoided discomfort due to the edge cutting in to my arm.  For other acoustic guitar styles, the edge can get uncomfortable.  The edge of a Fender Telecaster can be uncomfy, but it's still less sharp than the rounded edge of a violin.  I think the answer is simply that guitars and violins evolved separately with differing methods of construction. 

It depends on the technique and style. Picado, strumming and picking techniques performed by a highly skilled player can cause servere injuries. 

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11 hours ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

I'll try inverting the question:  If guitars don't seem to have plate edge fragility problems why aren't violins made that way too?

Because guitars have a soundhole which is big enough for most of the repair work without the need of a top removal, which is a lot more difficult in instruments without overstanding edges.

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19 hours ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

I'll try inverting the question:  If guitars don't seem to have plate edge fragility problems why aren't violins made that way too?

Ever seen one of those edgeless Rigat Rubus violins? They had normal purfling, as far as I remember, but the edge was blended into the ribs, which were convex. I bought one as a curiosity a while back. Impossible to put a chinrest on, so I just used it without a chinrest when playing outdoors. The idea did not pan out. 

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