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Alternatives to e string parchment

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Does anyone do anything different to prevent e strings digging into the bridge? (besides the bridges with ebony inserts, or the little tubes that are on strings). Just curious. Anything to apply to the groove to make it a bit harder?

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I roll the top of the bridge over a drop of thin CA (Krazyglue) glue. Let it set for a minute then roll over a paper towel.

I also use archival grade Tyvek glued to the bridge under the E string.

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I have put in small chunks of ebony, or white plastic (guitar nut/saddle material), as well as Delrin.  Unfortunately, I haven't found any glue that sticks well to Delrin, so the inserts tended to pop out.  One attempt to solve this problem was to drill a <1mm diameter hole vertically in the bridge, and turn down a piece of Delrin to fit.  

All of those things are a lot of work, so my current method is to just glue a tiny strip of parchment to the top of the bridge. Effective, easy, and conventionally acceptable. How boring.

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Thanks guys. Oded, how long does just the super glue last.

I have no problem with parchments in general But I convinced myself that gut Es work better without parchment, and I'd like to be able to switch between strings from time to time on one of my fiddles.

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3 minutes ago, pawsplus said:

What is wrong with just using the little plastic tube thing that comes with the E string? :-)

Good question, to be honest I never even tried them,  for 30+ years I've just been removing them, always used parchment. I'm trying to think if I even know anyone who uses them and I'm coming up blank.

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Super glue lasts a very long time on the A, D & G less so on the E. But you can re-apply as often as you like. The Tyvek seems to have a minimal effect on the sound IMHO.

 

Oded

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The tubes work ok but if they overhang into the bowed area they tend to dampen the string (somethimes that's a good thing ;-) so I keep the edge of the tube at the same plane as the front of the bridge so that none of the tube overhangs into the bowed area.

 

Oded

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28 minutes ago, pawsplus said:

What is wrong with just using the little plastic tube thing that comes with the E string? :-)

The string eventually slices through the little tube in my experience. 

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Have you tried gluing a small patch of parchment to the bridge? 

It has a lot of resistance, it is small, nearly invisible and replaceable.

Regards,

Juan

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2 hours ago, Juan Tavira said:

Have you tried gluing a small patch of parchment to the bridge? 

It has a lot of resistance, it is small, nearly invisible and replaceable.

Regards,

Juan

I believe this thread is about alternatives to that. 

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Funny, one aspect of the violin I never ever thought about, parchment on e and viola a I always took as a given, probably because it works so well. But maybe it doesn't all the time.

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I have several fiddles with Prim Orchestra strings, and none of them have ever had any problem with an E string digging into the bridge. If one did then I'd try one of these techniques to stop it. But I'd never bother to do it pre-emptively. And I hate those little plastic sleeves, which are too soft to do the job in the first place. I've had them rattle when I left them on the after length so now I remove them.

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On 7/9/2018 at 10:00 PM, Nick Allen said:

The string eventually slices through the little tube in my experience. 

I'm sorry, the phone version didn't show me the whole title :(

Juan

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4 hours ago, chungviolins said:

Parchment works best in my opinion, why looking for alternative?

I've only ever used parchments myself, and of course they are fine. But for plain gut I've used nothing, and I'd like something where I might be able to easily switch.   

And just the fact that its something I never really thought about and have taken it as a given. Just want to see if anyone else has anything to say.

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On 7/10/2018 at 3:54 AM, Oded Kishony said:

I roll the top of the bridge over a drop of thin CA (Krazyglue) glue. Let it set for a minute then roll over a paper towel.

I also use archival grade Tyvek glued to the bridge under the E string.

This works only for E strings without lapping because crazy glue, when hardened, somehow grips into the lapping. (Dropped this idea long time ago)

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2 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

The nicest method I know is to insert a sliver of ivory. Not the quickest method but lasts better than anything.

Some players don't like the sound, they say it makes e string too bright.

Bein & Fushi shop was doing it. 

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Just now, chungviolins said:

Some players don't like the sound, they say it makes e string too bright.

Bein & Fushi shop was doing it. 

If the string is too bright you can still apply a parchemnt over it. Looks like overkill, but in the end you'll be 100% sure that the e-string NEVER will cut into the bridge.

 

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I use drum skins, rather thin : 0.1 mm for violin, 0.2 for cello.

( you can scrape thick ones but if you have thin ones, easier and faster and you can make it almost invisible)

Good quality drum skins seem hard to find, used to be easy but they switched to synthetic long time ago.

I don't like pre-cut drum skins, they finish ugly.

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