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uguntde

Strange Gand pere at Tarisio

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Tarisio in this auction (June 2018) has Gand pere with a 'special feature': on both the front and back a strip of approximately the width of the bridge was essentially flat, longitudinally from the neck to the button. You can see it on the pictures if you know what to look for. Certainly a curiosity.

I wonder whether this was a weird experiment or a build for tropical countries or what?

https://tarisio.com/auctions/auction/lot/?csid=2198749184&cpid=3519217664&filter_key=

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In fact pretty much all conventional Gand Peres have 3-piece fronts. We have one on the website currently.

He was a real innovator - I’ve seen this design before, have to say the Tarisio estimate seemed low to me. Glad to see people are taking an interest.

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9 minutes ago, martin swan said:

In fact pretty much all conventional Gand Peres have 3-piece fronts. We have one on the website currently.

He was a real innovator - I’ve seen this design before, have to say the Tarisio estimate seemed low to me. Glad to see people are taking an interest. 

The stepped arching was just so extreme. I did like the sound. The low estimate may be owed to that strange arching. It is just unconventional. With respect to workmanship I find this school amazing, the scrolls are absolute perfection.

The violin of this school tend to be very rich in overtones, they have a very bright sound. I often play on a G Bernardel that is also built in this manner. In this Bernardel you don't see a flat ridge in the middle, but if you look at the thickness of the plates the same principle applies.

Is this what you mean with 3-piece front?

 

 

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The last one I saw with these pressed plates was also at auction - sold for a great deal more ...

I think this was a tonal experiment - very successful but just too far out to catch on. Appearance always triumphs over tone!

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27 minutes ago, Rue said:

What is "wrong" with the appearance?

If you take horizontal profile there is a discontinuity on either side, almost an edge across the region of the bridge, where the plates become alomst completely flat. On the pictures you see this on the back: two lines running down the instrument, this is where the ridges are.

Tonally it comes out very 'bright', high in overtones, as many of the instruments of this school. I personally do like this kind of tone, and think it was what they wanted: Instruments with a carrying, almost penetrating ringing sound. Hence a relatively stiff front (interestingly and back).  

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28 minutes ago, Rue said:

What is "wrong" with the appearance?

You cant really see it in the photos but rhe central strip front and back is completely flat, and the lateral “arching” is just a sharp angle.

Not sure if this was carved or pressed ...

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From the perspective of engineer, the stress concentration would occur where the flat plane and arched plate meet, (due to the sharp angle)

which means this violin would not be structually stable ;{

That is probably why the condition report says it has a bass bar crack near saddle.

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5 minutes ago, Jaster said:

From the perspective of engineer, the stress concentration would occur where the flat plane and arched plate meet, (due to the sharp angle)

which means this violin would not be structually stable ;{

That is probably why the condition report says it has a bass bar crack near saddle.

The report just mentioned "minor crack adjacent to saddle", but isn't it bass bar crack??

I am curious whether "bass bar crack" only means a crack propagated right on the bass bar or it includes a crack which is few millimetre away from the bass bar.(2~3 mm)

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12 hours ago, martin swan said:

In fact pretty much all conventional Gand Peres have 3-piece fronts. We have one on the website currently.

He was a real innovator - I’ve seen this design before, have to say the Tarisio estimate seemed low to me. Glad to see people are taking an interest.

Many Gand Père have 3 pieces top, with normal arching, the central piece was bent (says Etienne Vatelot) the idea sound very good but I was a bit desapointed to hear that they don´t sound better ( and maybe worse) than his normal instruments.

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16 hours ago, uguntde said:

If you take horizontal profile there is a discontinuity on either side, almost an edge across the region of the bridge, where the plates become alomst completely flat. On the pictures you see this on the back: two lines running down the instrument, this is where the ridges are.

Tonally it comes out very 'bright', high in overtones, as many of the instruments of this school. I personally do like this kind of tone, and think it was what they wanted: Instruments with a carrying, almost penetrating ringing sound. Hence a relatively stiff front (interestingly and back).  

 

16 hours ago, martin swan said:

You cant really see it in the photos but rhe central strip front and back is completely flat, and the lateral “arching” is just a sharp angle.

Not sure if this was carved or pressed ...

Thanks! That helps! :)

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