A few old violins compared


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13 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Our other daughter lives in Hawaii, which is a much harder culture to "pigeon hole".  An interesting mix of Polynesian, Japanese, and American ethics and culture

You can say that again! That's where I was born and raised. I've been on the "mainland" for a little more than a decade and I still feel out of place.

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Having spent Most of my life within 100 miles of the Canadian border I am certainly not a conneseur of Southern American accents but I will say that they are quite varied and imply anything from extreme gentility and education to minutely regional unsophistication. Among my Southern friends are a lady from Knoxville Tenessee whose speech evokes the ballroom scenes from gone with the wind to another from Louisianna whose geology professor voice has just the tiniest lilt to it whereas I could always tell when her mother was on the phone because she reverted to a half French patois that included regionalisms such as "making grocerys" and "saving the dishes" (meaning putting them away).

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1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

 have ever hated the South, even subtley.

Why did distinct from southern accent come to mind instead of valley girl?  It's institutional.  If the South had won the Civil War perception might be the other way around.  Interesting thing is it's getting worse, not better.

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40 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

Sure you have.  Why did distinct from southern accent come to mind instead of valley girl?  It's institutional.

Because regional accents are things which most Americans can notice right away, just like most UK people will notice regional accents right away, even if you and I can't.

 "Valley Girl" was a Frank Zappa song, "sung" by his daughter, Moon Unit One. It got a lot of exposure when it first came out, but faded as dialects morphed, and consequently became harder to relate to and interpret.

As odd as it may seem, Bruce Carlson was about the first person who got me to take a serious listen to Frank Zappa. It's one of so many things I am grateful to him for.

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6 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

You're really off base on that. "Valley Girl" was a Frank Zappa song, "sung" by his daughter, Moon Unit One. It got a lot of exposure when it first came out, but faded as dialects morphed, and consequently became harder to relate to and interpret.

As odd as it may seem, Bruce Carlson was about the first person who got me to take a serious listen to Frank Zappa. It's one of so many things I am grateful to him for.

I changed what you quoted  to be less accusatory sounding, which I didn't mean.

VG, mobster, surfer dude, if you want to create a dumb character, give him any kind of accent.  That's why I said the closest thing we have to aristocrat accent is no accent (we perceive it as none).  I guess that's the upper crust accent if you're foreign and can hear it as an accent...

I know Carlson is a fan of other folk music as well, which is hard to figure.  I can take it in tiny doses :)

 

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43 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

I changed what you quoted  to be less accusatory sounding, which I didn't mean.

VG, mobster, surfer dude, if you want to create a dumb character, give him any kind of accent.  That's why I said the closest thing we have to aristocrat accent is no accent (we perceive it as none).  I guess that's the upper crust accent if you're foreign and can hear it as an accent...

I know Carlson is a fan of other folk music as well, which is hard to figure.  I can take it in tiny doses :)

Bruce and I came from rather different backgrounds. I was a "preacher's kid", raised as if being a consummate classical musician was one of the ultimate things to aspire to. Both my parents had Master's degrees or better. Bruce was raised in more of a factory environment near Flint Michigan, and actually served some time working in the auto plants in Flint, as well as serving some time in the US Navy. While I"m not regretful of my background, I am also slightly envious of his background, but more particularly, what he managed to do with it.

I landed in the Weisshaar shop just out of high school. Bruce landed there after having worked in the auto factories, having served in the Navy, and having attended the Cremona violinmaking school. I will never quibble with him being smarter than I am. I hardly had to try, since high-level success was about all I had been exposed to. Bruce's dedication and learning curve are much more remarkable.

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I think blue collar guts is a good preparation for anything.  I remember reading a 9/11 survivor's account of how the blue collar guys in the building were getting things done and rescuing people, while the suits were good for nothing.  You made your own mark too, by being a PK and staying out of reform school ;)

 

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On 6/15/2018 at 4:34 PM, Don Noon said:

 

 

I should go through and listen again but for a first listen through I think the Vuillaume and then the Amati are the best two.  Now if Cole were to play each for 45-50 min. a piece that opinion could change.  Maybe along the lines of the Amati falling flat with nothing more to offer and the Vuillaume coming to life with more power and nuances that can make a great fiddle distance itself from the rest. 

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I was a knuckle dragging grease monkey for 20 years before I was retired.  Then I went to school for a while and became a certified egghead.  I worked long days then and I work long days now.  Did changing the color of my collar change who I am?  My wife is in the medical field and so a couple of times a year I go to a fancy work dinner.  I've had pleasant hours long conversations with some surgeons that are regarded as being among the top of their field.  They may have big paychecks and big houses, but to me they just felt like regular people.  Maybe because they were surgeons that two or three times a week stand at an operating table for 12-14 hrs at a stretch. No breaks.  That's a lot of physical and mental endurance.  Point is, individuals just don't neatly fit into other people's perception of their designated boxes.

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I would go for the Guadagnini. But what strikes me most is how similar they are. We hear them of course all through a cheap microprophone which probably twists the tonal spectrum considerably. 

There is another such video 

where they mix in a cheap Mirecourt violin into a mix of interesting violins, and it is really not that bad.

Interestignly, if you did this with violas the differences would be much greater. There are stylistic differences in violas (full tone vs nasal) that go way beyond a Bostonian vs a Alabama accent :).

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