Jim Bress

Oops! Slip of the gouge

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Hi Folks,  I was graduating a viola top last night with the intention of leaving everything thick to learn Joe Thrift's decision process on graduation.  However I had a slip of the gouge near the top block and dished out a thin spot 1.3 mm thick.  It's approximately an east-west oval about the size of a sound post patch.  Not the end of the world and I get to learn how to make a patch.  When making a patch for this application should I match up the grains as best I can or make a cross grain patch?

Thanks,

Jim

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Did you watch TV while working?

You should have same grain material from the cut off pieces. This one inattentive moment will cost you something like 2 hours to patch it up . I guess this was a good lesson. 

I would match the grain.

 

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These things happen in the best families. Last saturday I was cutting the f holes of a violin and my knife slipped and took away the tip of a wing. I spent the whole evening fixing it.

Dont worry and pay more attention next time.

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9 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Any chance of finding that gouged-out piece of wood and gluing it back?

That would be possible if it was a single scoop.   Actually I dug in too deep and instead of steering out the wood pried and a tear out started so I came at it from the other direction to get to a smooth cut out.  In other words multiple pieces.  I did take a piece of cut-off from the plate made a over-sized 1.2 mm section of spruce for something to do instead of cussing but I haven't decided on my best course of action yet.  I also tried making a fresh scoop from a cut off to fit in place but the single gouge stroke gives a piece smaller than my "pot hole".

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10 minutes ago, Andreas Preuss said:

Did you watch TV while working?

You should have same grain material from the cut off pieces. This one inattentive moment will cost you something like 2 hours to patch it up . I guess this was a good lesson. 

I would match the grain.

 

No TV, but I was trying to work quickly and I am working one handed because of an injury.  Those are just excuses.  Paying attention would have prevented the situation.   Thanks for the grain direction tip.

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4 minutes ago, Nicolas Temino said:

These things happen in the best families. Last saturday I was cutting the f holes of a violin and my knife slipped and took away the tip of a wing. I spent the whole evening fixing it.

Dont worry and pay more attention next time.

Yup, learning opportunity.  Best lesson (for me) from my last work shop was to not let mistakes bother you anymore than a pencil rolling off the workbench.  Learn from your mistake, fix it and move on.

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5 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

No TV, but I was trying to work quickly and I am working one handed because of an injury.  Those are just excuses.  Paying attention would have prevented the situation.   Thanks for the grain direction tip.

Jim, then get well soon!

Your injury reminds me of a story Rene Morel used to tell: Almost all violin makers in Mirecourt were able to produce 2 violins within a month, only Jaendel was able to produce 3. And Jaendel had lost one arm as a soldier in WW2! (True story!) ;)

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:lol:  I know the story.  In part that's why I've been building this viola almost entirely with my left hand (I'm right handed) instead of waiting to heal.  The other part is I'm unreasonably stubborn at times.  I managed to partially tear my upper and lower bicep tendons simultaneously.   Surgeon was impressed.  He said it was like pulling a rubber band to the breaking point and both sides breaking at the same time.  Lower tendons have been reattached and I've got about 80% of my range of motion back, but still can't put a load on the muscle/tendon.  Once I've recovered enough from this operation  The upper tendons will have to be reattached.  I plan on scheduling the second surgery after the workshop that way I may have partial use of my right arm.  I may finish the viola before I fully heal.  Still learning, I'm happy.  I miss playing though.

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Jim, a patch should be a piece of cake.  Chalk fit, and glue. Much easier than cutting a purfling groove!  I've never been a gouge guy.  I use my  Lie Nielsen plane for all my roughing out on the inside, and much of the outside.  Maybe it's slower?   But there is no chance of serious grain grabbing.  Where the grain shifts from forward to backwards it can bounce and chatter, but that's about it.  Even the plain poplar I'm working with now has that shift  in about 3-4 places, and opposite on each side because I flipped it.  I'm just not comfortable with gouges at all.

Left handed!  Hat's off to you.  I think. At least you can't be called a quitter. 

Really, try the plane. The only thing I changed (I modify everything) was to remove some material in an angle from the slot to allow a larger chip.  I didn't change the mouth, only gave the chips more clearance.  

https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/handplanes/convex-sole-block-plane?node=4063

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13 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

 I managed to partially tear my upper and lower bicep tendons simultaneously.   Surgeon was impressed.  He said it was like pulling a rubber band to the breaking point and both sides breaking at the same time.

Who were you beating up when it happened? :)

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Just now, David Burgess said:

Who were you beating up when it happened? :)

A large 3/4" warped, twisted, cupped, bowed wild cherry board for a furniture back.  With a scrub plane and #6 plane I finished it to a nice flat 1/4" perfect for the project.  Didn't realize my right arm stopped working until I went to stow my #6 and my arm refused to help.  At least it finished it's work before taking a holiday without permission.  The silver lining is that my wife thinks it's a good idea for me to buy power tools to help with doing rough work. ;)

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21 minutes ago, Ken_N said:

Jim, a patch should be a piece of cake.  Chalk fit, and glue. Much easier than cutting a purfling groove!  I've never been a gouge guy.  I use my  Lie Nielsen plane for all my roughing out on the inside, and much of the outside.  Maybe it's slower?   But there is no chance of serious grain grabbing.  Where the grain shifts from forward to backwards it can bounce and chatter, but that's about it.  Even the plain poplar I'm working with now has that shift  in about 3-4 places, and opposite on each side because I flipped it.  I'm just not comfortable with gouges at all.

Left handed!  Hat's off to you.  I think. At least you can't be called a quitter. 

Really, try the plane. The only thing I changed (I modify everything) was to remove some material in an angle from the slot to allow a larger chip.  I didn't change the mouth, only gave the chips more clearance.  

https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/handplanes/convex-sole-block-plane?node=4063

Ken,  For whatever reason I really enjoy gouge work and only switch to finger planes when necessary.  Planes would certainly prevented this goof up, but I still prefer gouges.  I think they are faster, but that's not why I use them.

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3 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

Your injury reminds me of a story Rene Morel used to tell: Almost all violin makers in Mirecourt were able to produce 2 violins within a month, only Jaendel was able to produce 3. And Jaendel had lost one arm as a soldier in WW2! (True story!) ;)

I think I've heard about this guy! I heard that René had an uncle who had lost a hand in WW2 (and had it replaced with a hook) who made a bet that he could make a violin from scratch in 24 hours, which he successfully did (while being supervised in shifts by other violin makers who made sure he used no prefabricated parts). Was this the same person?

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