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Andreas Preuss

Japanese paper (和紙 wa'shi) for restoration

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It is strange that I am here in Japan where Japan paper is easily available in all forms but I never seriously thought about using it for restorations. 

Long time ago I heard from a restorer in Germany that in his opinion there is nothing better to reinforce cracked ribs instead of using studs or parchment. 

Any other uses?

Anyone with experience?

How does it compare to other materials?

 

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Which washi?   There's over a hundred different types of the stuff, made in different ways, and used for different things.  :huh:

You might contact your restorer acquaintance to ask what type they used, and what they hardened it with.  I'd expect it's one of the types used for cores in lacquerware.  :)

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23 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Which washi?   There's over a hundred different types of the stuff, made in different ways, and used for different things.  :huh:

That's what I am trying to find out.

In any case I am not looking to discuss in the first place individually hand made papers. Though if someone tells me that they are definitely by far superior to machine made paper, well then I know already which direction I have to search.

There are interesting machine made Japan papers available for a very affordable price.

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Wooden bows (archery) are sometimes backed with paper to prevent breakage. Acts similarly to glassfiber. Folks had good results with brown grocery bags so perhaps there is no need for too exotic stuff.

What does make japanese paper sostrong? Will it hold soaked with HHG?

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1 hour ago, HoGo said:

Wooden bows (archery) are sometimes backed with paper to prevent breakage. Acts similarly to glassfiber. Folks had good results with brown grocery bags so perhaps there is no need for too exotic stuff.

What does make japanese paper sostrong? Will it hold soaked with HHG?

What I know about Japan paper is that you can use fibres from different plants and depending what plant you are using the paper is stronger or weaker. 

I have seen a documentary on an Ana flight about a Dutch man who became a Japanese craftsman. Absolutely fascinating . He made his paper from mulberry plants. 

So far I just made a quick experiment with machine made Japan paper I bought in creative life warehouse close to my shop. I glued it on small 3mm  thin spruce  boards to see how much it contracts. 

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Melvin has said that he's used it. Maybe he'll comment?

Some of the samples I have are extremely strong, almost impossible to tear.

Your samples must have extremely long fibres. I suppose that's handmade ?

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Yes I use Japanese paper. I can't really speak of it's use for restoration because that's not what I do, but I do use it in my new making for re reinforcement purposes in place of wood studs or velum. As has already been mentioned It's a bit like a vegetable form of fiberglass! I really must say I like it!  Often I make instruments with the intention of taking them apart and re working them and I will use paper studs to strengthen areas of the belly near the blocks for instance that could be vulnerable to cracking during removal of the belly. I sometimes use them to stud center joins or to make F hole eyebrows too. It is very fast and easy to use. I feel that there could be many more applications for it than I use.

I can tell a story against myself with washi paper. I first discovered the type I use in a London art store many years ago.  I don't know what plants it is made from but it is strong and has long stringy fibers. I think it is not handmade because it is quite cheap. As it happens I ended up marrying a Japanese lady and thought I'd request her help to look more into Japanese paper and find myself a few different types to use. We went to a beautiful little washi shop in Tokyo and the proprietor patiently showed us dozens of hand made samples. They were all beautiful but far too delicate and fine for my purposes! But I felt guilty for taking the gentleman's time so I bought some anyway! There is always this temptation to think that the first thing one finds can't be the best and that something better must be available if only one spends a lot of time looking...this was not the case!...   So...I went down the road to Tokyu Hands craft store in Tokyo and there they had some of the cheap machine made paper that I'd bought in London all those years ago...and I stocked up on that!

The washi paper I use is is around 0.28mm thick and is smooth on one side and rough on the other side. I glue it rough side down. The paper is a cream white color but goes translucent when hide glue is applied. 

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2 hours ago, Melvin Goldsmith said:

The washi paper I use is is around 0.28mm thick and is smooth on one side and rough on the other side. I glue it rough side down. The paper is a cream white color but goes translucent when hide glue is applied. 

This stuff, kitakata?   https://www.mulberrypaperandmore.com/p-4954-classic-kitakata-washi-paper-roll.aspx#

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2 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

I can't tell from the pics...it certainly looks interesting!....I kind of settled on what I use but there must be a lot of beautiful paper out there that I've not seen. Thanks for the link...I'll be looking at that!

 

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I use kozo washi (mulberry) from this source purchased through a local distributor. Specifically I had this ordered in for me as it wasn't a standard stocked item. Extremely strong stuff and a good penny to purchase. I used another kozo available in rolls when I worked at a big shop that seemed to be just as useful I suppose although not as pretty. I'm not certain which type of washi it was though.

DGSR:)

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15 minutes ago, DGerald StephenR said:

I use kozo washi (mulberry) from this source purchased through a local distributor. Specifically I had this ordered in for me as it wasn't a standard stocked item. Extremely strong stuff and a good penny to purchase. I used another kozo available in rolls when I worked at a big shop that seemed to be just as useful I suppose although not as pretty. I'm not certain which type of washi it was though.

DGSR:)

It is really a bit embarassing that I am sitting in the place and I know only so little about Washi. Thanks for the helpful information. I think I could locate on the internet the company which makes the paper you use.

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10 minutes ago, Andreas Preuss said:

It is really a bit embarassing that I am sitting in the place and I know only so little about Washi. Thanks for the helpful information. I think I could locate on the internet the company which makes the paper you use.

What would be really embarrassing would be having to order your washi through a Western supplier. :lol:

It's sort of funny, really.  I order various stuff from Japan all the time, and it gets here in 5 days or so. :)

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Awagami paper makes an injet line of kozo paper - You can find it here. Follow to an online store or in Japan I highly recommend calling them. Emails about sales get missed. They ship internationally through the online store. The inkjet kozo is top quality, and it comes in standard A-4 size which is easy and inexpensive to ship. All big enough for any instrument repair.

http://www.awagami.com/aijp/index.html

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2 hours ago, Stephen Faulk said:

Awagami paper makes an injet line of kozo paper - You can find it here. Follow to an online store or in Japan I highly recommend calling them. Emails about sales get missed. They ship internationally through the online store. The inkjet kozo is top quality, and it comes in standard A-4 size which is easy and inexpensive to ship. All big enough for any instrument repair.

http://www.awagami.com/aijp/index.html

Steven,

thanks for this. I appreciate it. I'll have a look.

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