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Fingerboard plane, Brian Derber style


violins88
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I do.  It's what I learned with and I like the idea of not having to skew the plane in order to help facilitate fingerboard concavity.  I wouldn't necessarily say it's any better, just what I'm familiar with.  The amount is pretty small, maybe .75mm, or maybe even less, on each end but it's just enough.  Most people I know use a Stanley small block plane (102?) but I made a Veritas apron plane into my dedicated fb plane.  I really like it a lot. 

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22 hours ago, violins88 said:

Brian Derber specifies, in his book, a plane that is slightly convex in the longitudinal direction. Darnton specifies a flat one. Anyone use a convex one?

I have both a Veritas standard block plane that is dead flat and an old Stanley 9 1/2 that has an ever so slightly convex sole similar to Thomas Coleman. I use both but if I need a little more dip I am forced to use the Stanley as I can control it better. The Stanley is curved so the the blade touches the work first. Sometimes it's too much even with the absolute minimum blade. I also modified the Stanley so I can close the blade opening (mouth??) right down to nothing.

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8 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

It looks like only the last 15mm or so is relieved. Does this small percentage of the sole actually help the plane follow the contours of the concave scoop?

 

Bill, that's mostly because it's challenging to take a photo of that sliver of light.  The whole sole is convex.  I believe it helps a lot, especially on the shorter boards of violins.

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15 hours ago, Jerry Lynn said:

Like Bruce, I have and use both.  I guess i'm non-committal... 

For me it depends upon whether or not I am trying to increase the longitudinal scoop or decrease it. My curved bottom Stanley on a cello is usually too much if I'm not careful.

Much depends upon where I start and what I want as an end result.

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For anyone who doesn't understand what Pasewicz and I are funning around about, I came out of the Weisshaar shop in Los Angeles, and Pasewicz served major time in the Morel/Francais shop in New York. I have spent significant time around Morel, and Pasewicz has also spent significant time around Weisshaar people. Both shops drew on the really valuable resources of those who had come before.

As much as we will both acknowledge having had really valuable training,  some minor differences in training are best  approached with a sense of tolerance or humor.

My impression was that Weisshaar was much more open to the latest innovative techniques than Morel, but focusing on ether end of the spectrum has its upsides and downsides When I was in the Weisshaar shop, we experimented quite a bit with the latest high-tech glues, but I don't recall any of them working out better than hot hide glue.

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5 hours ago, Bruce Carlson said:

For me it depends upon whether or not I am trying to increase the longitudinal scoop or decrease it. My curved bottom Stanley on a cello is usually too much if I'm not careful.

Much depends upon where I start and what I want as an end result.

My  "non-committal" was a poor attempt at humor.  I do much as you do, it all depends what I'm going after.  I find going after small anomalies easier with a flat bottom.  

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13 hours ago, Thomas Coleman said:

I wish I had taken better photos, but for the Mnetters that do use a curved bottom plane,  does it look about similar to my photo?  This is just a curiosity as I feel that mine works great. 

If it works.  When the plane is exactly right the scoop you end up with on violin, viola, and cello boards are all correct with only minor usage tweaks...in short...if it works.

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1 hour ago, JohnCockburn said:

Any tips on how to get a nice convex shape with the right curvature?

John, I have a 12" x 14" piece of plate glass that is covered on both sides with PSA backed sandpaper.  I forget the grit on each side and it changes from time to time but it's probably like 80 grit and 120 grit.  I took a piece of thin clear plastic (some kind of product packaging) and laid it on the glass.  Then, with half of the plane body on the plastic, so that it's elevated by the thickness of the plastic, I stroked the plane body back on forth, always maintaining the elevation on the plastic and never going past half the plane body length.  This will impart a natural curve.  I flipped it around and repeat going back and forth checking with a straight edge.  Eventually moving to a diamond coated sharpening plate.  Worked pretty well.  As per Jerry's post above, I'm not sure about a "right" curvature, mine works great for me. 

 

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