heavymetalalfa

This fiddle, she got loong linings,,

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Just a lighthearted look inside a fiddle .

I had to marvel at the one piece linings, but the repair stamp caught my eye.

Can't quite make out the first word, might be Prof M. L. Richards?

Just an antiqued trade fiddle otherwise.

Any one know of the repairer?

linings.jpg

dr fr22.jpg

Bench.jpg

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2 hours ago, heavymetalalfa said:

Bench.jpg

Thanks for this photo.  I feel sooooo much better about my bench now.  :lol:

That is a cool signature stamp. :)

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For the most part, the best repairers and restorers don't insert text about repair history inside a violin. The best strategy seems to be coming and going, leaving the fewest artifacts of ever having been there.

Documentation of the history of an instrument can be important, but I don't think it should take the form of graffiti.

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Agreed. Years ago when I was younger, I would sign in pencil on the inside of the top, but stopped long ago.

Over the years I have seen a few life stories written inside fiddles.

Inside the same fiddle, cleats are obviously newer than the notes, which appear to be Mr Richards's;

notes.jpg

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I've seen these types of continuous, over-the-corner-blocks linings on a couple of Markneukirchen/Schoenbach trade violins that were regraduated in the US, including one with obviously non-original linings of very dark wood (as dark or darker than walnut).  I think that the prevalence of this continuous interior lining on these instruments (as noted in a few recent threads and particularly by GeorgeH) could be explained by the regraduators' desire to improve the instruments overall (if there were no linings and thick ribs originally) or possibly to improve contact between the plates and linings after they had reshaped the plates to match their individual persuasions.

Very interesting to see the thicknesses expressed in fractional inches on the top plate pencil markings! Makes you realize the lack of precision that someone working in that system would have faced, and correspondingly, the roughness of some of these semi-pro regraduation efforts.

 

 

Edited by ChicagoDogs

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