Recommended Posts

Hello, I am wondering how/if to repair a corner of my c-bout that chipped off of my violin while practicing. It is a clean break, but I want to put it back as quickly as possible. I’m giving a recital on this violin in a week and don’t think I’ll be able to make it to the shop to get it fixed before I leave the state to perform and wondered if a simple repair with wood glue would be absolutely horrific or detrimental to my instrument and it’s value. It is very nice instrument and new to me, and I do not want to be doing something entirely foolish. I really don’t want to cause any further damage to my instrument, and was finding mixed reviews to the solution online. Please get back to me at your earliest convenience — I’m kind of panicking a bit...

The corner looks seamless when it is simply pressed back into place (without any adhesive) so I’m hoping that I might be able to make a simple repair on my own as it is not a part of the violin that needs to be reopened for any purposes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only hide glue, only one chance to do it correctly and invisibly without extra cost and trouble.

 

Go to the shop, get it put back on. The more you play it, the more rosin gets on the wood, the longer you wait, the more the surface of the wood oxidizes, not to mention snagging it on your cleaning rag or sleeve, or bow.

If all of the pieces are there, and it is as clean as you say, if you brought it into my shop I'd glue it back on and ask you to return for the touch-up later. Overnight emergency repair.

If you, however, choose to fix it yourself...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Nick Allen said:

I would imagine that it's advisable to remove the top in order to perform such a repair?

Unless the break doesn't encroach on the rib miter. 

not usually. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Greenviolin said:

(...) if a simple repair with wood glue would be absolutely horrific (...)

Yes. Wood glue would cause permanent damage. Just dont. If your instrument costed less than 300$ go ahead, otherwise - dont.

IF you decide to glue it yourself you have to use hide glue. And if you are not familiar working with hide glue, and it’s not a structural repair, you could consider using a tube if liquid hide glue (that does not need to be heated.) 

For best results thou, And especially if it’s not a cheap instrument, I would recoment taking it to someone that knows what they are doing. It does not sound like a complicated (read: expensive) repair. If it is a clean break you have one shot of getting it right. Options in prioritized order:

1.: Take it as fast as possible to a qualified luthier

2.: Do your thing first, but be careful with the corner, then take it to a qualified luthier later

3.: Glue it in place yourself, but do use hide glue. If your instrument costs more than a few thousand $, dont. Go back to option 1 or 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a good chance that the repair will be inexpensive, quick and invisible if you:

Touch the corner and the broken area as little as possible. I know, there's an urge to feel things like breaks and cracks, but don't.

Wrap the chipped-off piece loosely in something clean and soft (toilet paper?) and place it in something like a clean empty pill bottle.

Get it in to your professional right away. They can probably have it glued back in place in an hour or so, and any varnish work needed can be done at a later date. The chances of doing this job quickly and successfully depend highly on maintaining clean, unworn, uncontaminated surfaces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, David Burgess said:

There's a good chance that the repair will be inexpensive, quick and invisible if you:

Touch the corner and the broken area as little as possible. I know, there's an urge to feel things like breaks and cracks, but don't.

Wrap the chipped-off piece loosely in something clean and soft (toilet paper?) and place it in something like a clean empty pill bottle.

Get it in to your professional right away. They can probably have it glued back in place in an hour or so, and any varnish work needed can be done at a later date. The chances of doing this job quickly and successfully depend highly on maintaining clean, unworn, uncontaminated surfaces.

Like he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.