Scroll Quiz


Recommended Posts

it is an interesting scroll.  I haven't this style before.  Then again there are more things I haven't seen than things I have.  :)  Most striking is the rounding of the second turn walls.  I think if I was going to make a scroll like this I would transition the look of the second turn into the fluting for some distance.  Maybe it does and I just can't see it.  Certainly a different look or least one I'm not used to.  Thanks for showing the pics germain.

-Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, duane88 said:

I've never seen a Blanchi instrument before. No wonder I didn't know what it was!

:)  Have to wait and see if Germain says I'm correct.  The scrolls I put up are from a student, and the teacher, but if a modern-ish scroll pic what we have to go by, that's what it looks like to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

  The scrolls I put up are from a student, and the teacher

Hello Jeffrey

Do you mean Pierre Gaggini and his uncle (and teacher) Albert Blanchi ?

I'm  not sure but if one of them, according to many of  their instruments I have seen, It would be more probably Albert Blanchi in my opinion ( concerning the pictures posted by Germain ). That is also you what you seem to think.

Albert Blanchi was the major of Peille-Poglia in 1925-29, a village of the Nice hinterland, he was the son of Augustin Blanchi  (which also was a violin maker) and grandson of a violin-maker ( or instrument-maker ). Augustin is said to have learnt the craft in the Guadagnini family workshop in Turin when Nice was still a part of Piedmont-Sardinia,  Pierre Gaggini himself claimed this, he mentioned it in the Strad magazine in 1971, if I remember . I think the Blanchi family also had connections with Pressenda and others In Liguria and Piedmont... There is also a strong connection with Pierre Pacherel when he settled in Nice. Albert won a big amount of medals like his nefew Gaggini, and it seems like the town of Cremona ordered him a quartet based on models of instruments from their museums.

But you surely heard about all that.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, D. Piolle said:

Hello Jeffrey

Do you mean Pierre Gaggini and his uncle (and teacher) Albert Blanchi ?

I'm  not sure but if one of them, according to many of  their instruments I have seen, It would be more probably Albert Blanchi in my opinion ( concerning the pictures posted by Germain ). That is also you what you seem to think.

Albert Blanchi was the major of Peille-Poglia in 1925-29, a village of the Nice hinterland, he was the son of Augustin Blanchi  (which also was a violin maker) and grandson of a violin-maker ( or instrument-maker ). Augustin is said to have learnt the craft in the Guadagnini family workshop in Turin when Nice was still a part of Piedmont-Sardinia,  Pierre Gaggini himself claimed this, he mentioned it in the Strad magazine in 1971, if I remember . I think the Blanchi family also had connections with Pressenda and others In Liguria and Piedmont... There is also a strong connection with Pierre Pacherel when he settled in Nice. Albert won a big amount of medals like his nefew Gaggini, and it seems like the town of Cremona ordered him a quartet based on models of instruments from their museums.

But you surely heard about all that.

 

 

 

Is this the same Gaggini who worked in Paris in the 1960s and 70s or some other relative?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, D. Piolle said:

Hello Jeffrey

Do you mean Pierre Gaggini and his uncle (and teacher) Albert Blanchi ?

I'm  not sure but if one of them, according to many of  their instruments I have seen, It would be more probably Albert Blanchi in my opinion ( concerning the pictures posted by Germain ). That is also you what you seem to think.

Albert Blanchi was the major of Peille-Poglia in 1925-29, a village of the Nice hinterland, he was the son of Augustin Blanchi  (which also was a violin maker) and grandson of a violin-maker ( or instrument-maker ). Augustin is said to have learnt the craft in the Guadagnini family workshop in Turin when Nice was still a part of Piedmont-Sardinia,  Pierre Gaggini himself claimed this, he mentioned it in the Strad magazine in 1971, if I remember . I think the Blanchi family also had connections with Pressenda and others In Liguria and Piedmont... There is also a strong connection with Pierre Pacherel when he settled in Nice. Albert won a big amount of medals like his nefew Gaggini, and it seems like the town of Cremona ordered him a quartet based on models of instruments from their museums.

But you surely heard about all that.

 

 

 

Yup!  Looks like Blanchi to me.  I also believe he was fond of Seraphin models.  Didn't have a good shot of a violin scroll by Bianchi handy (I'm away from the shop presently and all I had was a Blanchi 'cello scroll on my laptop), so I included the Gaggini (who's scrolls were at one point pretty similar).  The Blanchi 'cello scroll I illustrated didn't have chamfers quite as round as the ones in Germain's photos, but they were rounded... it also had the omega cut into the top of the pegbox opening.

We'll see if I'm correct, or if Germain has thrown a curve ball.  If he has, all good.  It'll be a new maker for me to look into. The convergence of French and Italian in Piedmont, and where it spread, is fascinating. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Is this the same Gaggini who worked in Paris in the 1960s and 70s or some other relative?

Hello Nathan ,

Jeffrey's right , look at the following interesting article, if you read french or perhaps find a good enough online translator :

http://www.nicehistorique.org/vwr/?nav=Index&document=3496

He was in Paris in the 20s for his military service and at this time worked with fellow Parisian violin-makers he has known in his uncle's workshop. And returned to Nice in 1927... 
By the way , it says Pierre Gaggini was willing to talk about his craft and working life ... I could only say this was not really the case, even if I met him when he was 96 years old,  I am far from being the only one to say so.    When I knocked on his door he simply opened and slammed the door on my face, saying  " you are wrong there is nothing more to see here !! ". But this man seemed to complain that he had no child or not even some apprentice to follow him

Horacio Pineiro was supposed to get short apprenticeship from him , but according to one source : he simply got advices from time to time. And I think it was in the 70s.

Yes Jeffrey  you're right about Blanchi being fond of Santo Seraphin, which I fully understand...

Piedmont culture and  background  (though it is linked with France) has a stronger Italian flavour than french  , and was linked to the duchy of Savoy which was not french until 1860. like the county of Nice.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen French scrolls that looked very much like this. The voluts are under cut deeply and the edges are rounded (I suspect to give the look of ware). A nice normal champher around the first turn then diminishing to nearly nothing on the second turn. Looks way more French than Italian to me. I think they took the craftsmanship thing too far. Too perfect, almost boring.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Blanchi instruments I have seen are never boring even if the craftsmanship is often faultless.

I agree that when you put all your energy and concentration into perfect craftsmanship, it ends-up totally uninteresting.

"Sense of style "  is something else ! and I don't think, this maker was devoid of a personal " sense of style " and his instruments are often exquisite

to my eye.        By the way , have you ever had a genuine Albert Blanchi violin or cello in your hands ?

The chamfer on this particular volute is very rounded, but I find it still nice, I 'm not fond of the traditional French violin-making style neither.

But if you look at most modern Italian makers' instruments , the craftsmanship looks faultless as well... What would you think about such instruments then...

Gaggini ' s instruments are often much more stiff and unforgiving than the ones from his uncle, though sometimes they are really interesting as well.

What is striking is the change in appearance of Pierre Pacherel 's violins since he came back from the Pressenda workshop and settled in Nice.

He seemed much more ( so-called ) Italian in his style, though he has been a good friend and assistant of Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume before that, and was born in Mirecourt, and his work was often, technically speaking, perfectly done.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Jeffrey will forgive me for linking to a violin on our website, but we happen to have a nice Blanchi del Gesu model which might help to flesh out the discussion.

https://www.martinswanviolins.com/alberto-blanchi-violin/

It is very precise but it also has flair ... the scroll has the same quality as the OP scroll though without the exaggerated “torpedo” eyes. 

Soundwise his instruments tend to be very successful, which can’t be said of Gaggini!

We also have a Pacherele which is my current pet squeeze ...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.