marco2112

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IMHO, you probably got "fiddled" (which has an even more piquant colloquial meaning in German, BTW :lol:), either by the Amazon seller, or by the music shop.  Did they give you your bridge back?  If so, please measure it and tell us how wide it is.  If they kept the bridge, and did not compensate you for it....................that's a big deal.

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I have 2 draws full of violin bridge blanks for all occasions. If someone brought me his/her fiddle to set up, and issued me with a specially ordered bridge blank (or strings etc.) from Amazon, I would tell him/her to piss off.

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14 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

 If someone brought me his/her fiddle to set up, and issued me with a specially ordered bridge blank (or strings etc.) from Amazon, I would tell him/her to piss off.

It is attitudes just like this that make others pursue another instrument playing journey.

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I am quite surprised to read the response from two luthiers which I like that they would refuse to fit a special bridge that a customer wanted installed for some particular reason. 

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14 minutes ago, Jeff Jetson said:

I am quite surprised to read the response from two luthiers which I like that they would refuse to fit a special bridge that a customer wanted installed for some particular reason. 

I don't do it either.  One of my biggest pet peeves is a client handing me a bridge blank, or fittings for that matter.  Rarely are they appropriate or of suitable quality.  

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20 minutes ago, Jeff Jetson said:

I am quite surprised to read the response from two luthiers which I like that they would refuse to fit a special bridge that a customer wanted installed for some particular reason. 

If you take a bus into town, do you buy a bus first on Amazon, and carry it down to the bus stop with you?

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1 hour ago, uncle duke said:

It is attitudes just like this that make others pursue another instrument playing journey.

 

1 hour ago, Jeff Jetson said:

I am quite surprised to read the response from two luthiers which I like that they would refuse to fit a special bridge that a customer wanted installed for some particular reason. 

You may not like the language, or the sentiment, but the reality is that a luthier has a right to use materials they are confident using (and can stand behind), and to keep the door open by supplying and installing parts at fair, competitive prices sold through the shop rather than supplied by Amazon, or other internet suppliers.

I have, only once, installed a bridge when I didn't supply the blank... It was a 50 year old, extremely nice,  blank supplied from a specific player's "stash".  They did not get a discount for providing the blank, nor did they ask for one.

By my count, that's four luthiers so far.

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1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

I have 2 draws full of violin bridge blanks for all occasions. If someone brought me his/her fiddle to set up, and issued me with a specially ordered bridge blank (or strings etc.) from Amazon, I would tell him/her to piss off.

 

1 hour ago, uncle duke said:

It is attitudes just like this that make others pursue another instrument playing journey.

I'm sure Jacob would use more polite language in a real situation.  The nice thing about theoretical situations is that we can be a bit more free to express our sentiments...^_^

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Absolutely. You just got fiddled hard. Who admistered such treatment?  Enjoy your new bridge, which is worth most of $2. I bet they didn't even bother to fit and cut it correctly. If indeed you brought a viola bridge in, they should have let you know what they planned to do when you dropped it off. And not accepted it at dropoff. Aubert is not equivalent to what you ended up with, which you know. So of course you got fiddled.

Otoh, trying to buy stuff online then having your local luthier sort it out is also underhanded. It can often be more expensive to do it that way, which I guess you just learned. 

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

or strings etc.

I get this for sure. I always try to buy strings from brick and mortar shops. But I was in a very large shop once and asked for a Gold Label G, something pretty basic, but the guy behind the counter looked at me like I came from the moon and suggested something completely different, the guy next to him butted in and just told me to go on line....

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3 hours ago, Violadamore said:

IMHO, you probably got "fiddled" (which has an even more piquant colloquial meaning in German, BTW :lol:),

I'm still not sure if you got this right, there's not much reliable information under the bottomline of an online articleB)

Otherwise I'm usually pissed off if somebody comes for a repair bringing a fiddle he/she has bought somewhere else...

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2 minutes ago, Blank face said:

 

Otherwise I'm usually pissed off if somebody comes for a repair bringing a fiddle he/she has bought somewhere else...

But why? Isn't that like bringing your car to a mechanic that you didn't buy it off of?

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I remember a lady who came a couple of years ago with a set of Larsen Strings that she had bought  on Internet. She asked me to put the strings on her fiddle for her (nothing else) because „I do it so nicely“. I haven’t seen her since.

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5 minutes ago, Blank face said:

Otherwise I'm usually pissed off if somebody comes for a repair bringing a fiddle he/she has bought somewhere else...

I'm glad most shops dont think this way. I'm far away from the shops where I originally bought a couple good instruments and one of the guys is dead anyway. Plus I have stuff that was given to me, and yes, stuff bought at auction that needs professional work.

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^^yes Jacob... I can only imagine what you said, and I know it was awesome. 

Some people shop at the luthier, then buy online, then expect to save money on the setup back in the shop. Those people are no fun. Most luthiers don't tell them about themselves because they are all scared and they have a business to run. But not having those people come back would be nice too. 

OP's situation is different--it's that the luthier stole from him. I see it that way. Does anyone else? 

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16 minutes ago, deans said:

stuff bought at auction that needs professional work.

I see no motivation to restore something someone else has bought at auction, since I can buy at auction myself, just as I won’t restore anything for a dealer. I know some do, talk about „Road to Serfdom“

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I do find it somewhat odd that if a customer brought in a perfectly suitable bridge blank that some luthiers would refuse to take their money to fit it for them. 

Are the profit margins on violin bridges really that high? 

Somewhat related, the other day my luthier showed me the differences between a genuine Despiau bridge and Chinese counterfeit Despiau bridge (not mine). That was very interesting. The counterfeit bridge was taken off a customer's violin, so clearly someone is selling and installing them. 

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16 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

I see no motivation to restore something someone else has bought at auction, since I can buy at auction myself,

Well, there are some pretty nice violins being sold in auctions. In fact, there is an Amati looking for a restorer up at auction right now. ;)

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43 minutes ago, deans said:

I'm glad most shops dont think this way. I'm far away from the shops where I originally bought a couple good instruments and one of the guys is dead anyway. Plus I have stuff that was given to me, and yes, stuff bought at auction that needs professional work.

It might depend of the (virtual) shop sign, if it's "restored violins" or "repairing everything, good or bad".

The last bridge a customer brought for fitting was an extremely expensive online bought blank with a built in small microphone. I told him that this was pure nonsense IMO and refused in the first place, but (because I knew him for many years) was persuaded, just to get rid of him quickly, not without let him swear that he won't blame me if the thing would fail afterwards. Some months later he told me that the damned object flopped soon, as expected (no warranty from the online shop).

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22 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

I do find it somewhat odd that if a customer brought in a perfectly suitable bridge blank that some luthiers would refuse to take their money to fit it for them. 

Are the profit margins on violin bridges really that high? 

Somewhat related, the other day my luthier showed me the differences between a genuine Despiau bridge and Chinese counterfeit Despiau bridge (not mine). That was very interesting. The counterfeit bridge was taken off a customer's violin, so clearly someone is selling and installing them. 

I spend time to hand select brides used in the shop, and select bridges for use on specific instruments that I feel suit them.  Make more sense?

19 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

Well, there are some pretty nice violins being sold in auctions. In fact, there is an Amati looking for a restorer up at auction right now. ;)

I'm not against restoring auction instruments if they are ones I've purchased, but restoring one for someone else just uses time I could be satisfying established clients or restoring something for myself.

56 minutes ago, deans said:

I'm glad most shops dont think this way. I'm far away from the shops where I originally bought a couple good instruments and one of the guys is dead anyway. Plus I have stuff that was given to me, and yes, stuff bought at auction that needs professional work.

I work on many instruments I haven't originally sold to the client, but most of my clients have a long history with me.  

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