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Craigers

Glue on your spread wedge

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I'm curious what the consensus is on glueing the spread wedge. I learned to put a tiny amount on both sides of the spread wedge to hold the wedge to the frog and keep the hair in place. Later I was told that if you add glue to the hair side, the wedge was more likely to pull out because of the fluctuations in the length of the hair due to humidity changes. I've done it both ways and still can't decide which is better so I would like to know what others do.

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With glue.  The spread wedge can come out due to changes in RH from low to high either way. I see the wedge more likely to stay put with the glue; not so much because of the sticky ness, but because of the lubricating effect of the glue on the hair as it is being pushed into place (less likely to bunch the hair inside the frog).

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6 hours ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

With glue.  The spread wedge can come out due to changes in RH from low to high either way. I see the wedge more likely to stay put with the glue; not so much because of the sticky ness, but because of the lubricating effect of the glue on the hair as it is being pushed into place (less likely to bunch the hair inside the frog).

Jerry,

You are using glue on the hair side of the wedge? Or both sides? I'd certainly think the hair fluctuation loosens the wedge would be so if glued on the hair side.

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1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Jerry,

You are using glue on the hair side of the wedge? Or both sides? I'd certainly think the hair fluctuation loosens the wedge would be so if glued on the hair side.

Both sides.  The fluctuations of RH can loosen the spread wedge in both cases, but the lubricating action of the glue keeps the hair from pulling inside when you put the wedge in.  

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I never thought of glue as a lubricant but I can see what you mean. It seams that aliphatic resin doesn't adhere well to hair anyway so using it as a lubricant make sense since you have it on hand at that moment and you certainly wouldn't want to use a more traditional lubricant like grease or oil

Edited by Craigers
spelling correction

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On January 26, 2018 at 8:41 AM, Jerry Pasewicz said:

Both sides.  The fluctuations of RH can loosen the spread wedge in both cases, but the lubricating action of the glue keeps the hair from pulling inside when you put the wedge in.  

 

On January 26, 2018 at 9:21 AM, Craigers said:

I never thought of glue as a lubricant but I can see what you mean. It seams that aliphatic resin doesn't adhere well to hair anyway so using it as a lubricant make sense since you have it on hand at that moment and you certainly wouldn't want to use a more traditional lubricant like grease or oil

Jerry

What glue are you using?

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Aliphatic resin/Titebond.  

The biggest problem I see with spread wedges besides the wood being way too soft, is the orientation of the cut.  When removing a spread wedge, it is safest for the ferrule and the tongue if the wedge splits out cleanly. Spread wedges that are not oriented well need to be dug out bit by bit.  

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