GeorgeH

How to Repair Button Separation From Neck?

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Johnmasters said:

The photo is blurry,  but could I be seeing a washer and the head of a small lag screw through the neck block?

It is appears to me to be a brand or a manufacturing tool mark; it is definitely not a metal fastening device. It looks to me to be a "C" or a "D" or a "O" in the center of a circle.  I can't get a higher resolution picture through the endpin hole.

brand_on_block.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, chungviolins said:

No, you got it backward.

Lower overstand means smaller string angle, bc you cannot adjust br height too much, we have to use a good standard height br. (32-34 typically unless you want it really low like 30 mm)

(" nut  stays in the same place..." does not make sense, when you lower overstand you cannot make projection too low bc this will result too low bridge.)

3 things determine the string angle : overatand, fb projection ( or br height) and saddle. When you set the neck, we have total freedom for the first two, but you cannot make saddle too hogh or too low  for obvious reasons.)

It is simple geometry. If you draw the diagram, you will understand.

I'll attach a sketch later.

 

KYC

We are at cross purposes - I understand fine. I think you read my post too quickly.

I start with 2 fixed points, the saddle and the nut (in my view the top of the nut should be in line with the underside of the table as you sight along it), and an ideal bridge height (around 33-33.5mm).

So from my perspective, the overstand is an accidental product of a good string angle, given these factors - it isn't a starting point.

You are saying the same thing as me but I am starting from an ideal nut position rather than an ideal overstand.

It doesn't really matter that we conceptualise it differently, we are both looking for an ideal string angle at a viable bridge height (and for the same reasons), although we had a long thread recently where Don and others proved that the string angle doesn't matter :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, GeorgeH said:

It is appears to me to be a brand or a manufacturing tool mark; it is definitely not a metal fastening device. It looks to me to be a "C" or a "D" or a "O" in the center of a circle.  I can't get a higher resolution picture through the endpin hole.

brand_on_block.jpg

If it wasnt inside a violin, it would most likely  be made by a flat wood drill bit on a curved surface.

Like someone started to drill and then changed there mind.

If it is a makers brand,then its pretty uncommon, as surely someone would have made an id by now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Delabo said:

If it wasnt inside a violin, it would most likely  be made by a flat wood drill bit on a curved surface.

Like someone started to drill and then changed there mind.

If it is a makers brand,then its pretty uncommon, as surely someone would have made an id by now.

No, it definitely is not anything made by a drill. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, martin swan said:

We are at cross purposes - I understand fine. I think you read my post too quickly.

I start with 2 fixed points, the saddle and the nut (in my view the top of the nut should be in line with the underside of the table as you sight along it), and an ideal bridge height (around 33-33.5mm).

So from my perspective, the overstand is an accidental product of a good string angle, given these factors - it isn't a starting point.

You are saying the same thing as me but I am starting from an ideal nut position rather than an ideal overstand.

It doesn't really matter that we conceptualise it differently, we are both looking for an ideal string angle at a viable bridge height (and for the same reasons), although we had a long thread recently where Don and others proved that the string angle doesn't matter :lol:

I agree with you.

But, I don't believe there is optimum position for nut, it is determined by other factors.

I used to use your method 30 yrs ago, and I understand why , but I don't use the system bc nut position is not important, other factors , which I mentioned in my post, are more relevant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, chungviolins said:

I agree with you.

But, I don't believe there is optimum position for nut, it is determined by other factors.

I am among those who don't think that the nut position relative to the rib plane matters very much.

One can use a wide variety of overstands, and still get the same string angle over the bridge. But I also don't happen to think that a precise string angle over the bridge is critical. I've seen too many really good-sounding and good-working exceptions to this "rule".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, David Burgess said:

I am among those who don't think that the nut position relative to the rib plane matters very much.

One can use a wide variety of overstands, and still get the same string angle over the bridge. But I also don't happen to think that a precise string angle over the bridge is critical. I've seen too many really good-sounding and good-working exceptions to this "rule".

I also don't think one needs to follow anything slavishly.

It's interesting to note that people have totally different and apparently contradictory "philosophies" of the geometry of a violin and yet we all end up with pretty much the same configurations. 

This can make it very hard to agree on the things we agree on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

That sounds like a reasonable possibility.

Could be one of them there block circles left by some visiting alien race. Very similar to the crop circles that show up from time to time.

Nah, must have been a c clamp. You can see where it digs in more at the top and bottom of the circle, and less on the right and left sides where the block curves. This tells me it was made under pressure by a round, flat disk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.