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In most cases it is possible to identify a bow wood by sight, with a bit knowledge and experience, but you have to provide better photos: Higher resolution, brighter, more focussed.

Ideal would be horizontal side views of the head and parts of the stick, for identification purpose side views of the frog, too, as well as from the underslide.

The photos above don't tell anything in particular except a damaged frog and a german mass produced adjuster (which isn't necessary original).

BTW, testing the wood is possible with lime at an unvarnished spot without damaging anything, so beware of this.

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Are older pernambuco bows dark in color because they are old, or is it because that's the way they were made?

My F.N. Voirin, Albert Nürnberger, and Richard Weichold bows are all well over 100 years old and dark, but so are both of my Paul Martin Siefried bows  and my Seifert bows- latter half of 20th and early 21st century. I've also got a dark viola bow stamped C. Bazin, but I'm pretty sure it's newish and probably Asian.

The Morgan Anderson bows I've seen have been very light - are they going to go dark in another 60 - 80 years?

 

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Good pernambuco can originally be any colour- (dark pernambuco = good quality is wrong) , but buyers tend to prefer dark bows for some reason.  many top makers chemically treated their bows from the outset if they were too light in colour.  Tubbs went to the extreme and over darkening them .

Some light pernambuco will stay that way for 100s of years .Others high in dye content will darken naturally quite quickly especially if the wood surface is untreated.

Charles Espey wrote a little in this blog.

http://charlesespeybows.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/color-of-wood.html

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14 hours ago, Andrew Victor said:

Are older pernambuco bows dark in color because they are old, or is it because that's the way they were made?

My F.N. Voirin, Albert Nürnberger, and Richard Weichold bows are all well over 100 years old and dark, but so are both of my Paul Martin Siefried bows  and my Seifert bows- latter half of 20th and early 21st century. I've also got a dark viola bow stamped C. Bazin, but I'm pretty sure it's newish and probably Asian.

The Morgan Anderson bows I've seen have been very light - are they going to go dark in another 60 - 80 years?

 

From conversation with a bow maker, pernambuco is light colored (kind of orange(ish)) when freshly cut and darkens with light exposure.  He said he often darkens new bows just by putting them by a sunny window for a day.  The one I bought is light colored because there was no time to light treat it (picked up hours after completion), but will darken over time.

-Jim 

image.thumb.png.d63abd59bdcb8def62160a4e5b492641.png

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