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Merry Christmas


David Burgess
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What? Wait, where's Festivus?

Seriously, Merry Christmas was the phrase used by drunken revellers who preferred Winter Solstice celebrations:

Then the Catholic Church tried to co-opt the phrase and put some religiousity (never a good thing in a pluralistic society) back into the celebration.  The whole co-opt thing was a protest against commercialization...http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-young-merry-christmas-origins-20171222-story.html

It’s the most wonderful fight of the year: the annual tussle between Christians who bravely defend “Merry Christmas” and the godless liberals who want to impose “Happy Holidays” on all of us. Or so the story goes on talk radio. But while President Trump promises to restore “Merry Christmas” to American life, those who insist on using the phrase as a sort of flag for conservative Christian culture misunderstand its history. Rather than religious, its origins are secular and commercial, even profane.

For most of its history, the Christian church regarded Christmas as a small event on its calendar not requiring much observation. Puritans in England and later the American colonies went one step further, banning the holiday altogether since they could find no biblical support for celebrating the day. As the historian Stephen Nissenbaum has explained, the Puritans imposed fines on anyone caught celebrating and designated Christmas as a working day. These strict rules were necessary since so many men and women engaged in the drunken carousing that accompanied winter solstice festivities, an ancient tradition that the church had failed to stamp out when it appropriated Dec. 25 as a Christian holiday....

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3 hours ago, l33tplaya said:

What? Wait, where's Festivus?

Seriously, Merry Christmas was the phrase used by drunken revellers who preferred Winter Solstice celebrations:

Then the Catholic Church tried to co-opt the phrase and put some religiousity (never a good thing in a pluralistic society) back into the celebration.  The whole co-opt thing was a protest against commercialization...http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-young-merry-christmas-origins-20171222-story.html

It’s the most wonderful fight of the year: the annual tussle between Christians who bravely defend “Merry Christmas” and the godless liberals who want to impose “Happy Holidays” on all of us. Or so the story goes on talk radio. But while President Trump promises to restore “Merry Christmas” to American life, those who insist on using the phrase as a sort of flag for conservative Christian culture misunderstand its history. Rather than religious, its origins are secular and commercial, even profane.

For most of its history, the Christian church regarded Christmas as a small event on its calendar not requiring much observation. Puritans in England and later the American colonies went one step further, banning the holiday altogether since they could find no biblical support for celebrating the day. As the historian Stephen Nissenbaum has explained, the Puritans imposed fines on anyone caught celebrating and designated Christmas as a working day. These strict rules were necessary since so many men and women engaged in the drunken carousing that accompanied winter solstice festivities, an ancient tradition that the church had failed to stamp out when it appropriated Dec. 25 as a Christian holiday....

Ok hold on!  If I'm understanding you writings correctly, if I use the term "Merry" I should be engaging in drunken carousing?  Cool! :)  Now where's the Irish whiskey for my morning coffee?

Merry Christmas everyone.  I'm enjoying that special quiet time drinking morning coffee (no whiskey) while the household has yet to wake up.

Cheers,

JIm

 

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11 hours ago, l33tplaya said:

What? Wait, where's Festivus?

Seriously, Merry Christmas was the phrase used by drunken revellers who preferred Winter Solstice celebrations:

Then the Catholic Church tried to co-opt the phrase and put some religiousity (never a good thing in a pluralistic society) back into the celebration.  The whole co-opt thing was a protest against commercialization...http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-young-merry-christmas-origins-20171222-story.html

It’s the most wonderful fight of the year: the annual tussle between Christians who bravely defend “Merry Christmas” and the godless liberals who want to impose “Happy Holidays” on all of us. Or so the story goes on talk radio. But while President Trump promises to restore “Merry Christmas” to American life, those who insist on using the phrase as a sort of flag for conservative Christian culture misunderstand its history. Rather than religious, its origins are secular and commercial, even profane.

For most of its history, the Christian church regarded Christmas as a small event on its calendar not requiring much observation. Puritans in England and later the American colonies went one step further, banning the holiday altogether since they could find no biblical support for celebrating the day. As the historian Stephen Nissenbaum has explained, the Puritans imposed fines on anyone caught celebrating and designated Christmas as a working day. These strict rules were necessary since so many men and women engaged in the drunken carousing that accompanied winter solstice festivities, an ancient tradition that the church had failed to stamp out when it appropriated Dec. 25 as a Christian holiday....

Playa, what you've presented (including the links) is a secularly biased viewpoint. That's fine, but I hope others realize it isn't the whole picture. While "Christmas" can mean many different things to people, and can and has been celebrated in many different ways, the word itself comes from various forms of the words "Christ" and "mass".

Most Christians don't take issue with how other people refer to the holiday season, or how they symbolize it, but would like to experience the same level of tolerance from others, including secularists and atheists.

The US constitution prescribes freedom of religion. It does not guarantee freedom from religion.

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Merry snow covered Christmas from Michigan.  Our daughter just moved back from Arizona this summer so we are taking the hour long drive to Livonia this morning.  We haven't been with the grandsons (four of them 1, 7, 7, 9) ever for Christmas.  Our son is up from Chicago,  and the youngest daughter will be there too.  All in a 1200 sq. foot house.  That's all ours is too, but ours seems huge with just the two of us now.  Fun chaos.  Thanksgiving was great, but the boys will be off the wall today.

Ken

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1 hour ago, Addie said:

David, put some Irish in that Starbucks and have a Merry Chrish, erm, a Cherry Mist... No, a Merry Christmas!

My humidifier is steaming and gurgling away merrily. :)

It's a wee bit cold around here, supposed to hit -4F tomorrow night. Might require a little "liquid fortification". :lol:

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4 hours ago, David Burgess said:

My humidifier is steaming and gurgling away merrily. :)

It's a wee bit cold around here, supposed to hit -4F tomorrow night. Might require a little "liquid fortification". :lol:

It was -28C  (-18F) here this morning, and upon arriving at church discovered someone had accidentally set the thermostats to cool instead of heat. Mass went at an accelerated pace.

I'm going to break out the home made raspberry wine this afternoon and a jug of 182 proof liquid fortification for those that can't shake the chill.

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6 hours ago, David Burgess said:

The US constitution proscribes freedom of religion. It does not guarantee freedom from religion.

Uh, not to be the Word Police, but shouldn't that be "prescribes" and not "proscribes"?   aaaaaaand, thank you "Uncle Bob" for putting the X back in ..... our literally surreal, iconic, legendary and impactful holiday season.     

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10 hours ago, l33tplaya said:

What? Wait, where's Festivus?

Seriously, Merry Christmas was the phrase used by drunken revellers who preferred Winter Solstice celebrations:

Then the Catholic Church tried to co-opt the phrase and put some religiousity (never a good thing in a pluralistic society) back into the celebration.  The whole co-opt thing was a protest against commercialization...http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-young-merry-christmas-origins-20171222-story.html

It’s the most wonderful fight of the year: the annual tussle between Christians who bravely defend “Merry Christmas” and the godless liberals who want to impose “Happy Holidays” on all of us. Or so the story goes on talk radio. But while President Trump promises to restore “Merry Christmas” to American life, those who insist on using the phrase as a sort of flag for conservative Christian culture misunderstand its history. Rather than religious, its origins are secular and commercial, even profane.

For most of its history, the Christian church regarded Christmas as a small event on its calendar not requiring much observation. Puritans in England and later the American colonies went one step further, banning the holiday altogether since they could find no biblical support for celebrating the day. As the historian Stephen Nissenbaum has explained, the Puritans imposed fines on anyone caught celebrating and designated Christmas as a working day. These strict rules were necessary since so many men and women engaged in the drunken carousing that accompanied winter solstice festivities, an ancient tradition that the church had failed to stamp out when it appropriated Dec. 25 as a Christian holiday....

Possibly of interest to some, hopefully only a few dyspeptics among us.  After the divisiveness we've put ourselves thru in recent years, the very least we can do is be more civil to each other at the holiday season, without being unnecessarily didactic.

We get plenty enough of that from the talking heads on the 24 hour news cycle.<_<

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2 hours ago, phutatorius said:

Uh, not to be the Word Police, but shouldn't that be "prescribes" and not "proscribes"?  

Thanks, my mistake, I have gone back and fixed it.

2 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

You can't have freedom of religion without having freedom from religion. In other words, true freedom of belief must include the freedom not to believe.

That may be what you or I believe, but it doesn't happen to be what the constitution says.

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