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Engraved James Tubbs bow


jowl
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In years gone by, it was common for a novice nun to bring a dowry from her family to the convent when she joined. Her social status tended to follow with her to her new life.

The novice was also allowed to bring a personal present, that would remain her own. 

Here in Ireland, if the girl played the violin, often a violin or bow was chosen, and if the Meinel and Hofmann shop was approached, they recommended a Tubbs bow. When money was no object, engraved gold mounted bows, otherwise silver. These bows were often passed on eventually to favourite students. 

It's possible that the same held for boys joining monasteries, but I don't know. I know of one Brother who had a Fagnola violin and I think a Tubbs, but that may be a coincidence. 

Just a suggestion.

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Martin, i dont think Tubbs did the engraving on his bows,i would have expected he farmed them out to a local silver chaser/engraver of which London was full of them at the time,as was Birmingham and a few other places . If someone has information to the contrary then please post.

The inscription in the OP could have been done by any one .

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6 hours ago, fiddlecollector said:

Martin, i dont think Tubbs did the engraving on his bows,i would have expected he farmed them out to a local silver chaser/engraver of which London was full of them at the time,as was Birmingham and a few other places . If someone has information to the contrary then please post.

The inscription in the OP could have been done by any one .

OK point taken!

The engraving is not of the quality you normally see on a Tubbs ...

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Aren't these quite different bows?

The engraved gold bows were the top of the range. These are the 'presentation' bows, witb a metal slide to be engraved with the dedication.

But more ordinary bows could be engraved too, by the buyer, like Brother Eaton's. 

Not to be outdone, here's a nice one. Not mine I'm afraid.

 

20171216_103751.jpg

20171216_103803.jpg

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This stands up quite nicely to the engraving on say the Wilhelmj Tubbs bows, but as others have pointed out there is nothing remarkable about this kind of work, and it's commonplace amongst silversmiths.

the chased silver or gold parts which have a more ornatate floral engraving (like Conor's above) on them are always of a different character which you also find on Samuel Allen and some Early and very fine Hill bows. It's quite obvious that these were produced in batches, and despite different ferrule sizes that it was the same goldsmith working for all of them - whereas an inscription would always be a one off, so you even get the two types of engraving on the same bow.

some time ago I saw a prize bow from around this period which wasn't English at all, which is evidence - of evidence be needed- that it was not always the bowmaker who organised the engraved inscriptions.

it doesn't make any difference to the status of the bow, but all his work should be chased quite deeply into the metal. Shallow engraving is what you see on "family silver" of the period, and is far more likely done at the local jewellers. 

 

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2 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

That would surprise me.  Why do you think so?

The letters are very slightly offset (specially on the word 'brother'), pretty typical of something that's been hand-stamped, and with exception of the word 'from' which seems to be a smaller typeface, the letters that repeat have the same artifacts and bias. And the rounded edges particularly on the interior spaces of the letters R, O, and A is very characteristic of stamping. And the little marks above and below the words (most noticeable on 'brother') seem like the stamp was stricken hard enough to mar the metal with the base (which I'm sure has a proper name but I can't think of it now). And the square-angle flat interior of the letters makes me think of stamped metal, not metal that's been cut (engraved) into.

Of course, I'm making these assumptions from a photo. I wouldn't claim to be 100% sure unless I saw it in person.  ;) 

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Though Fox Mitchell has a point, what i cant explain is the apparent double stamp on the `h` of `the`.  If they were stamps i would expect it was stamped one letter at a time(cant imagine ,anyone getting stamps made up for a one off dedication,though may be wrong).

If they were individual stamps how come the same letters are different? Slightly puzzling.:)

Also look at the two large `e`s the middle line goes up slightly on one and down on the other....i suppose they could have had a few mixed sets of individual letters which would explain it. The 3 `o`s are all different sizes.

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It seems to me that the words 'Brother Eaton' were set out in an arch to reflect the shape of the ferrule. I wonder about the dots over and under the letters, but can't help thinking they're an effort at decoration. The repeated letters are so varied that I can't see a stamp being used.

I can't imagine stamping the plate without at least disturbing it's place in the frog, or stamping the ferrule without spreading the silver and distorting it terribly.

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