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Nick Allen's Bench.


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2 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

That’s pretty fast!  Do find the method dictates the shape at all compared to “standard” method?

Yup. I was so tired of wasting time sculpting the arch. This method makes you take very deliberate and large gouge cuts. It also eliminates the need to correct the arch with a scraper. 

Is there a "standard" method?

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3 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

Yup. I was so tired of wasting time sculpting the arch. This method makes you take very deliberate and large gouge cuts. It also eliminates the need to correct the arch with a scraper. 

Is there a "standard" method?

Maybe cutting cross grain. I did use quotes. :)  I’d like to see a video of this method being done. 

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5 hours ago, scordatura said:

sausage method

Hi Nick,

sounds interesting, I'm salivating already!  Is that Bratwurst, or Italian, or Polish, or... :-)  

I'd also like to learn about this technique, perhaps I'd find something applicable to my own gouging/archingmethods.

Thanks, and good luck finishing up the quartet.  Cello looks very nice...

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On 9/11/2020 at 9:53 AM, scordatura said:

Out of curiosity, who or where did you learn the sausage method from? I would be interested in hearing about it.

 

On 9/10/2020 at 4:59 PM, Jim Bress said:

Maybe cutting cross grain. I did use quotes. :)  I’d like to see a video of this method being done. 

Once I fully understand the method, I can expound on it more. Basically it involves centering everything in the barrel of the arch, and gouging straight to the edgework from a tangent of the central cylinder. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/8/2020 at 1:51 PM, MikeC said:

I would like to read more about the 'sausage' method.  Where can I find more description of it?   

I'm not sure. I don't fully understand it quite yet. I was essentially handheld thought it this first go-around. But once I have a better grasp of things I can elaborate. 

That said, it's not for everyone. The idea is for the arch to fail into the right shape, so to speak. 

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On 10/10/2020 at 3:36 PM, MikeC said:

Thanks,  hopefully once you get more accustomed to the technique you'll post more info on it.   I'm not too fond of the usual 5 cross arches method or the inside first method so I just wing it 

Yeah. Me too. I'm still kind of working it out. I almost trashed a top recently doing it. The main benefit is that it establishes a method, that is repeatable, and shows in the final product. In my opinion, it makes you act like a violin maker, and not an enthusiast or hobbyist. 

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3 hours ago, David A.T. said:

May I ask you if you glued the front & Back with some stresses applied by the clamps in the area where it poped ?

humidity can vary from 40 to 60. I think (heard/trust) it is better to be in the 40-50%RH  range than into the 50-60RH.

the join looks nice so for me. :-)

Hmm. I glued it with some stress like a suction joint. A little gap in the middle. So perhaps that could have contributed in some strange way?

I have to get a hydrometer or something that connects to wifi so I can monitor it, even when I'm away. 

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