Thomas Coleman

Baroque solid ebony fingerboard?

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Hey Ben, Albert Cooper says in a monogram on Napoleonic Fittings that the tailpiece and pegs for the Lady were made at/for the Hills. They do seem darker and less crisp than the Vuilaume carvings. He seemed very sure of the provenance. BTW do you have any more pics of the tailpiece?

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5 minutes ago, MeyerFittings said:

Hey Ben, Albert Cooper says in a monogram on Napoleonic Fittings that the tailpiece and pegs for the Lady were made at/for the Hills. They do seem darker and less crisp than the Vuilaume carvings. He seemed very sure of the provenance. BTW do you have any more pics of the tailpiece?

The writing on this one is identical to the writing identifying the fingerboard as "A.Stradivari 1721" ... I'd like to get back to the Musee de Lam Musique with the tools to properly draw it, I'm afraid I realised the significance of this after I photographed it and came home. 

It's as original as the fingerboard! The Fittings Albert Vooper talks about are presumably what's in there now :) 

 

 

 

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On 7/12/2017 at 8:10 PM, wooden said:

Hi. I thought the Lady Blunt fingerboard was veneered. You can even see photos of it anywhere internet. Maybe is it from another violin?

Sorry, my bad, I was thinking of the image of the underside which I believe is solid maple. The top side is veneered in ebony. Don't have the photograph with me. Anyway the early Amati boards are solid maple for sure like the tailpieces and often decorated with intertwining purfling. The board on the Hieronymus Amati Viola c.1620 in Modena is veneered spruce. The small 'del Gesù' Chardon 1735 is solid maple with a veneer of ebony. 

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Bruce

do you have a view on whether the c.1620 Amati fingerboard is Amati work or later? (I know I should have the book and the answer should be simple).

If it is original, it would be the earliest positively dateable Ebony veneer fingerboard I am aware of, and early enough to challenge many preconceptions, notwithstanding that inlayed maple fingerboards exist concurrently into the early 1700s 

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Returning to the photos of the Chappuy instrument above for a moment (thanks Ben): it looks like that elegant tailpiece has no more wood than is necessary to bear the tension of the strings. Has anyone done research on the effect of tailpiece mass on quality and/or volume of sound?

 

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On 9/12/2017 at 4:47 PM, Ben Hebbert said:

Bruce

do you have a view on whether the c.1620 Amati fingerboard is Amati work or later? (I know I should have the book and the answer should be simple).

If it is original, it would be the earliest positively dateable Ebony veneer fingerboard I am aware of, and early enough to challenge many preconceptions, notwithstanding that inlayed maple fingerboards exist concurrently into the early 1700s 

Hi Ben,

Sorry about the late reply. The board is not very long which would fit into the Amati period but I have no way to determine if it is original to the instrument. There is a manuscript repair label from Jacob Steininger in Mainz dated 1795 which overlaps the original Brothers Amati label. The instrument has been around and outside of Italy. You might want to query John Dilworth who did some work on the viola.

The neck appears to have been removed at one time and a small wedge inserted between the end of the neck root and the rib, likely to raise the projection height. The neck block is in two pieces, as one finds when a part of the neck block is split away to pull the nails and remove the neck. The missing block wood is replaced and the neck re-nailed to finish the operation. The same type of operation was done to 'il Cannone' when the neck was modified at the heel to increase length.

Bruce

5a32127dbc549_vaAmatic1625.jpg.877f2e493dd87536a6c46928cba40f62.jpg

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