SCM3216

Johann Strad 1745 Antique Violin Repaired by Joseph Winner 1856

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I believe this violin was made by Johann Strad circa 1745 from what I can make from the label.  However, I have not been able to find anything regarding Johann Strad.  It was repaired by Joseph Winner in 1856. I found that Joseph Winner Sr. was a violin maker and also made repairs in Philadelphia, PA during the early to mid 1800's. The violin has a unique dove tail on the back.  Any information of the age/maker would be very helpful and greatly appreciated. 

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The name is rather Strack, not Strad, from Brag, means Prague, which both it most probably isn't, but a 19th century Vogtland made violin with a reproduced (copied) label from the same period.

Can't actually find this name either, it's possibly a product of fantasy only.

The button repair is what's in another recent thread regarded as a "brick".

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That's such a big brick it might have come off the Pyramids!

 

Also, looks like whoever was running the pantograph the day that rolled off the line forgot the switch the back pattern in after the machine finished the belly.

Edited by JacksonMaberry
Edited for clarity.

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I'm supposing, too, that it was made before the invention of the milling machine.

Reg. the brick, I'm afraid, that this sort of repair is very often caused by the failed attempt to remove a through neck, breaking out the the button as well as some wood beneath it.:huh:

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1 hour ago, Blank face said:

I'm supposing, too, that it was made before the invention of the milling machine.

Reg. the brick, I'm afraid, that this sort of repair is very often caused by the failed attempt to remove a through neck, breaking out the the button as well as some wood beneath it.:huh:

Or just an accident that broke out the neck along with the button and supporting platform. One mustn"t imagine bad amateur repairers are lurking everywhere behind every brick. We live in an amazing era of "invisible" retoration techniques. Not that long ago, a brick would just ellicit a "shrug" if the rest of the fiddle was intact. I've seen some retorer friends take a worm-eaten pulverized back and make it look absolutely perfect to the naked eye. I'd almost prefer to buy a fiddle with a visible brick and nothing else than a visually perfect fiddle that has had 80% of its original wood and varnish replaced.

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Michael has some good points These bricks are obvious, ugly, and easy targets to make fun of. But it seems to have been a common repair (not restoration)  that didn't really affect the playing properties too much.

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9 hours ago, Michael Appleman said:

 I'd almost prefer to buy a fiddle with a visible brick and nothing else than a visually perfect fiddle that has had 80% of its original wood and varnish replaced.

That's well said - but I'm guessing that most of violin buyers want a visually perfect fiddle rather than a battered looking with 80% original substance, otherwise the demand (and prices) for the first kind won't be so high.^_^

OTOH, a "brick" made of well matching wood, adjusted and touched up fine ain't the same as one from accidentally chosen and roughly inserted pieces, and unfortunately we very often find the last.

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