Stavanger

How did these cracks occur, and how should they be treated?

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What you see is the upper treble side of the back plate on a 80+ years old fiddle - seen from the side. Assuming the cracks are old. How did this happen? Tension in the wood? Not dry wood when it was made?

How would you go ahead in adressing this issue? Leave as-is? Some kind of filler? Remove plate, moist/soften, glue and clamp together? I am setting it up and doing some repair on it, but I am not aiming for a complete restauration. Would prefer not removing the back.

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On 11/16/2017 at 11:53 PM, Stavanger said:

Sure thing Edi!

 

 

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Thank you Stavanger - iirc that year the winter was cold and the snow was 2m deep. Lots of time to do such work. Very nice. The grain in the back is also stunning.

cheers edi

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Edi, you are so spot on it is kinda scary! By googleing snow depths in 1936 it's referred to as a record year in Norway, still not beaten! "On the last day of january the snow was 198cm in Geilo" hahaha!  :) 

About the fiddle, I agree. The back is stunning. Looks like Alnus Glutinosa (Svartor)  to me. And the knotty top seems to be pine (pinus sylvestris).  It is currently clamped up as to Jacob's recomendations. Need to cut a new bridge for it, and then she will sing again!

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