sospiri

Casa Stradivari

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I very much enjoyed John Dilworth's article on the Stradivari sons courtesy of Tarisio

What brought me to this article was that when looking at photos of the Messiah Strad, I noticed the f holes are distinctly un Strad-like, slanted, with the lower eyes much wider. So who cut those f holes? It wasn't Antonio, he always cut them so the middle part was vertical and the innermost part of the lower eyes lines vertically with the innermost part of the C bouts did he not?

Thankfully these articles shed some light on the workshare during the later years in the Casa Stradivari.

https://tarisio.com/cozio-archive/cozio-carteggio/stradivari-and-his-sons-part-1/

https://tarisio.com/cozio-archive/cozio-carteggio/stradivari-and-his-sons-part-2/

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Torbjörn Zethelius said:

The Soil has the same tendency as far as I can see. Vuillaume probably made that one too.

 

Of course, Vuillaume made all the best Stradivari....;):)

 
Even to me it seems that these slanted F holes are not just on the Messiah, it is a feature that appears in other Stradivari violins (but maybe all was made by Vuillaume....:rolleyes:)

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Sospiri, the role and level of involvement of Stradivari's sons in the actual making remains controversial.

“In 1824, the Cremonese biographer Vincenzo Lancetti, who had interviewed Count Cozio di Salabue in compiling an account of violin making in Cremona, described the work of Stradivari’s sons; according to his account, paraphrased by the Hills in their 1902 book on Stradivari, they “principally confined their efforts to repairing and adjusting instruments, aided in the varnishing and general management, so that the master might be free to devote himself unremittingly to the construction of his instruments. "

Many assumption have been based on the notion that Antonio couldn't have possibly made somewhere around 1000 instruments. I think this assumption is flawed, particularly if Antonio had a couple of sons taking care of the peripheral matters and the gruntwork and prep.

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18 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Sospiri, the role and level of involvement of Stradivari's sons in the actual making remains controversial.

“In 1824, the Cremonese biographer Vincenzo Lancetti, who had interviewed Count Cozio di Salabue in compiling an account of violin making in Cremona, described the work of Stradivari’s sons; according to his account, paraphrased by the Hills in their 1902 book on Stradivari, they “principally confined their efforts to repairing and adjusting instruments, aided in the varnishing and general management, so that the master might be free to devote himself unremittingly to the construction of his instruments. "

Many assumption have been based on the notion that Antonio couldn't have possibly made somewhere around 1000 instruments. I think this assumption is flawed, particularly if Antonio had a couple of sons taking care of the peripheral matters and the gruntwork and prep.

Yes David it's controversial because nobody knows but many opinions are offered. I don't just defer to John Dilworth's great experience and knowledge, I think that in those articles he is offering common sense opinions that may offend some people's romantic notions but he feels these questions should be addressed and that's a good thing.  I don't doubt Antonio Stradivari did most of the detailed work on those 1000 plus instruments. But there are some anomalies.

Why does the Messiah have those unusual slanted f holes and why does almost nobody mention this? I think it's strange to discuss Stradivari intstruments endlessly but not to mention this. John Dilworth has addressed the issue of asking why there was a change during this period. I really don't belive that Antonio Stradivari would change the usual f hole pattern and placement of the Amati tradition, especially late in his life. But his sons may have had different ideas and followed a new trend that maybe customers were requesting?

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5 hours ago, sospiri said:

Why does the Messiah have those unusual slanted f holes and why does almost nobody mention this? I think it's strange to discuss Stradivari intstruments endlessly but not to mention this. John Dilworth has addressed the issue of asking why there was a change during this period. I really don't belive that Antonio Stradivari would change the usual f hole pattern and placement of the Amati tradition, especially late in his life. But his sons may have had different ideas and followed a new trend that maybe customers were requesting?

I have seen two types of F-hole layouts in Strads; slanted and straight. There are many more of the Messie kind.

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6 hours ago, sospiri said:

Yes David it's controversial because nobody knows but many opinions are offered. I don't just defer to John Dilworth's great experience and knowledge, I think that in those articles he is offering common sense opinions that may offend some people's romantic notions but he feels these questions should be addressed and that's a good thing.  I don't doubt Antonio Stradivari did most of the detailed work on those 1000 plus instruments. But there are some anomalies.

Why does the Messiah have those unusual slanted f holes and why does almost nobody mention this? I think it's strange to discuss Stradivari intstruments endlessly but not to mention this. John Dilworth has addressed the issue of asking why there was a change during this period. I really don't belive that Antonio Stradivari would change the usual f hole pattern and placement of the Amati tradition, especially late in his life. But his sons may have had different ideas and followed a new trend that maybe customers were requesting?

Sospiri, I don't find it offensive, just unsupported.

Stradivari made many changes during his lifetime, and never really stuck with the Amati tradition. Why did the "long pattern" come and go? Must those have been built by one of the sons who then passed away? ;)

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 I haven't read the article referred to but as for slanting the f's more in one case than another, I can recall doing that myself to cut out a small sap pocket in an otherwise nice piece of wood.  So there are practical reasons why someone might make such a change.

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23 hours ago, Torbjörn Zethelius said:

I have seen two types of F-hole layouts in Strads; slanted and straight. There are many more of the Messie kind.

A small number of slanted ones, not many. The camera angle can be deceptive.

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22 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Sospiri, I don't find it offensive, just unsupported.

Stradivari made many changes during his lifetime, and never really stuck with the Amati tradition. Why did the "long pattern" come and go? Must those have been built by one of the sons who then passed away? ;)

The Maggini influnce? Which maybe influenced the slanted f holes too?

But what beliefs really can be supported if there is not much evidence, just mainly opinion?

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