Sign in to follow this  
maxr

Baroque violin tailpiece, nut, tailgut?

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Borisravel said:

The problem comes from the difference of sensivity to humidty between european and and exotics woods.

If the peg is made from european wood, it will expand and contract like the pegbox's maple.

No, no problem with gut, only solutions !

For baroque music, simplicity and lightness are the keys.

Now I'm confused. In your previous post you advocated the use of exotic wood for pegs such as ebony and rosewood. 

Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're thinking about this: " The problem with pegs is not material itself, the problem comes from the fact that modern pegs should absolutely made of ebony or rosewood instead of boxwood or fruit trees. "

I wanted to say that for violin standard, pegs should be made from ebony or rosewood. But first, ebony pegs come later and second, it's an ecological disaster, like solid ebony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Early violin makers didn't have "lightness as a goal".   Yes their violins had lighter setups than modern violins, but they didn't know modern setups.  They were just making violins that worked for their purposes, with the right qualities, maybe they were paying attention to mass, maybe balance--just as some modern makers do.

Maple fingerboards suited the goals of early violin makers until overspun strings became common.  Yes the veneered softwood core board seems to have been common, but there were some veneered maple boards (i.e. Stradivari 1690 and 1721) and later there were even some solid ebony wedges.

As to 'lightness' and the technical challenges of baroque technique, it's worth keeping in mind that  the widespread use of chin rests lagged far behind the modernization of the violin, i.e. well into the 2nd half the 19th c.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2019 at 4:05 PM, Borisravel said:

 

I'm looking for historical accessories but it's not easy to find.

So True. I've been scouring the internet for weeks for an 18thC violin tailpiece and the closest was an ivory one on ebay which was take down for CITES reasons, I guess.

I'm looking for an ebony or black stained one..

Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Borisravel said:

I've made mines, I think it's the easy way to have it... Please, don't use solid ebony, it' too heavy.

Thanks for the advice about the ebony. That's why I thought stained fruitwood might be acoustically better and more authentic. Making one isn't a problem but it would be more satisfying to have one which is truly contemporary with the instrument.

Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2019 at 11:59 AM, Borisravel said:

The problem comes from the difference of sensivity to humidty between european and and exotics woods.

If the peg is made from european wood, it will expand and contract like the pegbox's maple.

Uh oh! What do you have to offer in support of that notion? If you are either a highly-versed wood tech, or some kind of semi-famous fiddle maker, I might be willing to put my reservations aside for a little while, pending more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Uh oh! What do you have to offer in support of that notion? If you are either a highly-versed wood tech, or some kind of semi-famous fiddle maker, I might be willing to put my reservations aside for a little while, pending more information.

I'm just a lute player and tuning 2x13 strings each hour on 2 différents lutes taught me that Fruitwoods pegs are easier to tune in some places with a great variation of humidity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Borisravel said:

I'm just a lute player and tuning 2x13 strings each hour on 2 différents lutes taught me that Fruitwoods pegs are easier to tune in some places with a great variation of humidity.

What is your sample size? One instrument, ten, or hundreds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

Uh oh! What do you have to offer in support of that notion? If you are either a highly-versed wood tech, or some kind of semi-famous fiddle maker, I might be willing to put my reservations aside for a little while, pending more information.

Is your reservation based on evidence or instinct?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, GlennYorkPA said:

Is your reservation based on evidence or instinct?

It is based on charts like this. (Sorry, I can't find my much more detailed chart right now, with more wood species)

Understanding%20Hardwood%20Floors-10.jpg

 

Chapter 3, page 10 in this book from the United States Department of Agriculture lists more species.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/fplgtr113.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Chapter 3, page 10 in this book from the United States Department of Agriculture lists more species.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/fplgtr113.pdf

But your document is for constent moisture, it's not the same thing for pegs, which can suffer from high moisture difference and it's exactly the problem between african woods and softer woods like fruitwoods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Borisravel said:

But your document is for constent moisture, it's not the same thing for pegs, which can suffer from high moisture difference and it's exactly the problem between african woods and softer woods like fruitwoods.

Sorry, I'm failing to understand what you're getting at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even European woods have wildly different reaction to humidity. Most of them also have hugely different reaction along grain vs. cross grain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.