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Joe Robson's Balsam Ground 3


jowl
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Looks like bad turps to me.  If you cannot get Diamond G you can CAREFULLY warm the material to increase penetration.

Diamond G ships to Europe and Canada....I don't make anything on recommending them!

If you continue to have problems i will replace the material, though I have never ween this issue in the past, so I hope it works out...

Joe

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It does look very pale and I doubt you will get any more color into the wood now that it is sealed with BG3.

Here is one coat of cape aloe on unsealed white wood left in the sun for two weeks to fade and then two coats of water thin clear copal varnish applied to seal the color.

010.JPG.ed900546520fea347194725202f24fae.JPG

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Very nice! 

However I don't believe the wood is sealed until the application of balsam ground varnish (for the uninitiated Joe's ground system consists of BG 1-4 and then BG varnish.) Joe's website recommends applying aged wood dark brown (wood colour) after BG3. I will post a picture after I do mine. 

Joe's ground sets out to reproduce Cremonese ground's colour (pale gold) and amazing reflectivity, so is not intended to be as dark as your ground. Perhaps Joe can comment?

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6 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

It does look very pale and I doubt you will get any more color into the wood now that it is sealed with BG3.

Here is one coat of cape aloe on unsealed white wood left in the sun for two weeks to fade and then two coats of water thin clear copal varnish applied to seal the color.

010.JPG.ed900546520fea347194725202f24fae.JPG

Nice ground.

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Mike

Aloe is Vera is different...

Aloe Ferox or Cape Aloe grows in South Africa and can be bought on Amazon. Look for aloe ferox bitter extract. It comes in powder form which can then be dissolved in vodka.

DISCLAIMER------WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T DRINK, ALOE FEROX IS A POWERFUL COLON CLEANSER

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1 hour ago, lpr5184 said:

Thanks Christian.  I'm experimenting with the ingredients you mentioned in your bench thread. Do you think it needs more yellow?...maybe add some gamboge to the aloe?

No, you are , in my opinion, at the limit of too much colour. No more yellow! If you want a better experimentation, do it on plain maple and spruce carved, everything looks nice on a nice figured rib.

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13 hours ago, jowl said:

Very nice! 

However I don't believe the wood is sealed until the application of balsam ground varnish (for the uninitiated Joe's ground system consists of BG 1-4 and then BG varnish.) Joe's website recommends applying aged wood dark brown (wood colour) after BG3. I will post a picture after I do mine. 

Joe's ground sets out to reproduce Cremonese ground's colour (pale gold) and amazing reflectivity, so is not intended to be as dark as your ground. Perhaps Joe can comment?

The Balsam Ground will enhance the colors of the wood.  The purpose is to replicate the deep and varied reflectivity of the Cremonese ground.  I provide the Aged Wood Colors to give you control of the color of the wood, which is a separate consideration from the ground.

Also one can use other alcohol soluble colors in the Balsam Ground.

Joe

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On 11/2/2017 at 10:14 PM, lpr5184 said:

It does look very pale and I doubt you will get any more color into the wood now that it is sealed with BG3.

Here is one coat of cape aloe on unsealed white wood left in the sun for two weeks to fade and then two coats of water thin clear copal varnish applied to seal the color.

010.JPG.ed900546520fea347194725202f24fae.JPG

I have been looking into using another South African aloe, though I have to admit to being modestly discouraged by the prospect of harvesting enough sap to make it worthwhile.  And then there is acquiring the plant in the first place.  But I am intrigued by this color.  I'll have to look up Christian's thread.

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I see! what's the main purpose, to seal or enhance contrasts or both. This summer I have tested a lot of ways to prepare the wood before I seal it with glue size (I'm strongly against letting varnish go into the wood). Conclosion from all tests - letting the varnish penetrate the wood (burn the flames) gives the best result in terms of beauty, but that is not what I want.

coloring a flat piece is easy, but that's not how violin plates are, especially the top.

I'm kind of okay with what I have - quark/lime/linseed oil glue size and my own varnish in different colors - but I want more...

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