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Violadamore

How very cool of Brompton's to do this.

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Might be "cool", whatever that means, but after listening to the merchandise, mixed with the lackluster playing and abysmal recording I don't think it was such good an idea. There isn't for nothing in advertising they say "Only in the gravest cases/should you use your clients' faces" . 

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Bromptons have been doing this for over a year now. Perhaps it's a two-edged sword sometimes, but I don't think serious players would buy or not on the basis of these recordings alone, and dealers, as we all know, don't give a toss what it sounds like :D

I don't find the playing lacklustre - perhaps Carl needs to see a lady in a nice sequined frock in order to think she's making an effort ...! Kind of difficult if not inappropriate to emote heavily in this scenario ....

Yes the recording isn't hi-fi but I think it tells you a lot - it's pretty unadulterated, precious little coloration from the room, not too close either. If I had to choose one of these violins I would be quite happy to make a selection on the basis of these recordings.

I would be very interested to hear what others think, but for me the Matteo Gofriller 1710 is way out in front - (FOUR Gofrillers in one sale, must be some kind of record), the Facini in 2nd place, very fine and beautiful though perhaps a bit less full-bodied, and the Francesco Rugeri also a refined and complex sound.

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1 hour ago, martin swan said:

 

I don't find the playing lacklustre - perhaps Carl needs to see a lady in a nice sequined frock in order to think she's making an effort ...! Kind of difficult if not inappropriate to emote heavily in this scenario ....

 

Way to much vibrato, not enough articulation. Makes one think the violin is unresponsive....  

But otherwise yes to the frock.... :)  

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7 minutes ago, carl stross said:

Way to much vibrato, not enough articulation. Makes one think the violin is unresponsive....  

 

All of the clips? Both players?

 

7 minutes ago, ______ said:

To me honestly lot 195 sounds best.

Yes I really liked that - it is challenging to compare when the two players both have very different sounds of their own.

I'll be interested to see how my impression of the recordings compares with the experience of playing them.

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10 minutes ago, martin swan said:

All of the clips? Both players?

 

No, only the first one. The 2nd one lets the violin breath more and has inherently better articulation. Two violins in the 2nd group are not too shabby. For these "samples" I prefer somebody who doesn't overpower the instrument. The first player reminds me of Michaela Martin in the 80s - thick tone, all violins sounded the same. And starting vibrato after sounding the note is nice and of good effect but maybe not all the time... :)

Here's an example of proper playing and proper recording :

 

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2 hours ago, carl stross said:

The interesting thing here is that save for two of them a good new violin will blow them out of the water. Here's a Burgess - no comparison :

 

 

Well the violin sounds great but the recording is done in a large and reflective room with stone walls and a hard floor.

I know I keep banging on about it, but room acoustics are 50% of the sound, and also heavily affect how someone plays. There is absolutely no possibility of drawing comparisons between instruments played in such different spaces - even if the recording gear was identical.

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3 hours ago, carl stross said:

No, only the first one. The 2nd one lets the violin breath more and has inherently better articulation. Two violins in the 2nd group are not too shabby. For these "samples" I prefer somebody who doesn't overpower the instrument. The first player reminds me of Michaela Martin in the 80s - thick tone, all violins sounded the same. And starting vibrato after sounding the note is nice and of good effect but maybe not all the time... :)

Here's an example of proper playing and proper recording :

 

I don't think an auction house can be expected to employ James Ehnes and an extremely expensive video and audio recording studio to do a multi-camera shoot ...

The editing budget alone is probably more than the commission on a Gofriller.

Nice fiddle, nice playing, beautiful neutral sound with a halo that only money can buy. I agree about the recording approach - a big space with a high ceiling, lots of careful acoustic treatment, multi-mike set-up with plenty of air. You need a big, heavily baffled and very well defined space to record from that distance ...

The recording is also stereo, which gives about a 500% improvement in detail and "realism".

Having said all that, the violin sounds a bit sugary to me - perfect for this repertoire but a bit limited.

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10 hours ago, martin swan said:

Well the violin sounds great but the recording is done in a large and reflective room with stone walls and a hard floor.

I know I keep banging on about it, but room acoustics are 50% of the sound, and also heavily affect how someone plays. There is absolutely no possibility of drawing comparisons between instruments played in such different spaces - even if the recording gear was identical.

Sure, but still no dead notes, on a dime response,  GREAT pitch focus and pretty free of wolfs.... :)  Very consistent between registers. I could've done Tch's 1st Mov on it trouble free while on that Gofriller I would've had to on with the skin of my teeth wondering what's next. Yes, the tone is "interesting" but is it worth the trouble ? I don't know...  Also, David seems to set them up for very clean - too clean.

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10 hours ago, martin swan said:

1. I don't think an auction house can be expected to employ James Ehnes and an extremely expensive video and audio recording studio to do a multi-camera shoot ...

2. The editing budget alone is probably more than the commission on a Gofriller.

3. Nice fiddle, nice playing, beautiful neutral sound with a halo that only money can buy. I agree about the recording approach - a big space with a high ceiling, lots of careful acoustic treatment, multi-mike set-up with plenty of air. You need a big, heavily baffled and very well defined space to record from that distance ...

4. The recording is also stereo, which gives about a 500% improvement in detail and "realism".

5. Having said all that, the violin sounds a bit sugary to me - perfect for this repertoire but a bit limited.

1. Very true

2. Can't the son of the owner do that ? They're all good with computers. :)

3. Not something I know anything about but for sure I like it ! 

4. Never met a Conductor or Top Player who wouldn't disagree with both those statements. Food for thought... ;)

5. I other words you're hooked and want one. I like the "a bit sugary to me" which when it comes to Strads implies "... but I could make it work". :lol:

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11 hours ago, martin swan said:

Well the violin sounds great but the recording is done in a large and reflective room with stone walls and a hard floor.

I know I keep banging on about it, but room acoustics are 50% of the sound, and also heavily affect how someone plays. There is absolutely no possibility of drawing comparisons between instruments played in such different spaces - even if the recording gear was identical.

I enjoyed the music, the playing, the sound of the violin and the acoustics, they help contribute to the Baroque sound methinks. 

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2 hours ago, carl stross said:

 

2. Can't the son of the owner do that ? They're all good with computers. :)

 

I think people don't really understand what they are looking at when they watch a performance like this.

Generally such performances are shot on one camera, which means you do a master shot which includes the audio performance, and then you do a load of close-up stuff or alternative shots for visual variety and to cover errors in performance where the master shot is discontinuous (edited).

Or you do a multi-camera shoot which may still involve editing between takes - it is extremely difficult to get a single take where the performers, the audio crew and the various camera operators and the vision mixer get everything right.

To me this looks like a one-camera shoot, so basically a lot of the visual material is just video, the audio being taken from a master take which se are seeing some of the time.

If there's editing to be done, it has to be done with someone who has visual flair and a complete understanding (technical and artistic) of the piece and of the performance. Such people are paid a lot of money ...

 

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