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New Auction record for a Wilf Saunders Violin


Televet
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...I think. The Violin at the Amati auction today made 3000 UK pounds, that's $4000 American, $5000 Canadian (3600, 4800, 6000 with buyers premium). I was a disappointed underbidder, but well I stuck to my budget, or who knows where it would have ended!

Sadly, no pictures to post, I always think it sad that they vanish from the Amati site as soon as the lot closes. There are some beautiful photos that would be a valuable resource if only we could see them, and would make a valuable addition to the images that we have in the Cozio Archive.

 

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Many thanks for the pictures. I am constantly surprised at how little Violins like this sell for at Auction. I believe, that with a few notable exceptions this seems to be par for the course for many modern makers which while arguably good for the violinist isn't very encouraging for makers. I certainly don't think the price was high, just higher than my discretionary budget on the day!

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The violin was advertised as violin No.19 from 1962.

Dad religiously kept a notebook of all instruments that he made, which tells you where he bought the wood, plate weights, thickness’s (mind you, sometimes in 128ths of an inch) sometimes who he sold it too etc. I couldn't find Violin No. 19 from 1962 anywhere in my copy of the book, so I asked my sister, who has the original. She replied:

There is no record of a violin 19.  The pages of the little notebook are numbered and you will see number 17 on page 34, number 18 on page 40 then violin 20 on page 59.

This also accords with the complete list he made of all the instruments (5 sides of A4).

You can also see from that list that there is no instrument 58 or 81.

The pages in the book miss out 58 also, so that must be violin 19 as the viola numbering is sequential.  What I mean is that in the book there is a spread with pages 56 and 57, turn over and it’s 59 and 60,  The same happens with the page 81, there is a jump from 79/80 on one spread to 82/83 on the next.  You will see this from the numbering of the copied pages.  It’s the book, not my copying!

I wonder if instrument 81 will ever appear.

Very odd.”

Back in 1962, dad was principally involved with making Violas for Tertis, but I still wonder how this one did not get recorded.

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2 hours ago, Delabo said:

Beautiful violin.

A very reasonable price for such an impressive professional  instrument.

I guess that there's something with it like a "maker's maker", similar to " musician's musician" - not much known to the broad public, more to those who know about their stuff?

I'm curious if it will appear now at some dealer's website soon.

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Nice looking. Lots of violins from the last generation of makers is undervalued IMO. Many of the makers that I admired when I was younger are now cheaper than when new 30 years ago.

Sell your overvalued stuff and buy undervalued. I would gladly trade a Roth for this.

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  • 8 months later...
5 hours ago, Rue said:

Is it my imagination or ...

. ..does it seems like the average newly commissioned instrument will sell for, let's say $10K, directly from the maker - but then, at auction, sell for only $4K?

 

I have just paid around $10k for an instrument direct from maker, which is a lot for me, knowing that the likely shop price is higher than $10k (though he discounted a couple of instruments which had remained unsold for several years, which also affects perceptions) and the likely auction price could easily be far lower than $4k, since there are auction records online. There is no buy-back deal, and it is a difficult decision to take to buy for a price I will never be able to resell for. He compared it to buying a car,  but it is not really the same, and the chances of needing to send it back with a fault are small. My reasons for deciding to pay more than I needed to for one of his instruments were complex.

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The living makers I know who place instruments for sale at shops, the shop prices agree with the prices direct from the maker.  That benefits both the maker and the shop.   Many shops offer trade-ins for instruments they sell and the trade-in can be used at the shop to buy another instrument from a different maker.  A maker might allow a trade-in but usually just for a different instrument by the same maker.  A maker might offer free adjustments and minor repairs which would be paid for at a shop.

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16 hours ago, Rue said:

Is it my imagination or ...

. ..does it seems like the average newly commissioned instrument will sell for, let's say $10K, directly from the maker - but then, at auction, sell for only $4K?

 

I've noticed that too.  Some auction records are way below supposed new price.

~~~~

Fiddle looks like a Cannone copy?

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