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D. Piolle

Anima Nova

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We had a demonstration at Oberlin. They were nicely made, and seemed to be well thought out.

Thoughts in the group were that it might be a handy tool for experimenting with position and tension, and then making a wooden post to copy these values. Or that it might be less expensive for an owner than having numerous posts made for an instrument over the years.

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Hmmmmm, many German luthiers "partnering", along with a few elsewhere in Europe, but nobody at all in France, Italy, or the UK, and only one USA shop.  Wonder why? :huh:  Also wonder what they go for, wholesale to partners, that could make a big difference.  At say, $50 each, they might "take over" like certain bridge, peg, and tailpiece brands/designs have.

 

The thing looks interesting, but is far too pricey for my operation, unless used as a gauge to cut a wooden one from, and then, would the solid wooden post act like the multi-piece carbon one?

Might be fun to put one in one of my personal violins, just to see if it does anything as special as its pricetag.

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

We had a demonstration at Oberlin. They were nicely made, and seemed to be well thought out.

Thoughts in the group were that it might be a handy tool for experimenting with position and tension, and then making a wooden post to copy these values. Or that it might be less expensive for an owner than having numerous posts made for an instrument over the years.

 

18 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Hmmmmm, many German luthiers "partnering", along with a few elsewhere in Europe, but nobody at all in France, Italy, or the UK, and only one USA shop.  Wonder why? :huh:

 

The thing looks interesting, but is far too pricey for my operation, unless used as a gauge to cut a wooden one from, and then, would the solid wooden post act like the multi-piece carbon one?

I thought about it as a gauge, of course, to experiment with tension , position and so on... but there is no demonstration video that shows how it works , hope they will do a demonstration in Cremona, in this case I 'll let you know and post pictures.

I wonder how to tighten it , unless one need to cut the instrument like on the picture :blink::wacko::P

I 'm not convinced a wooden post will behave the same way as a carbon one.

On another hand it could be used as a carbon soundpost in a carbon violin :)

Thank you all for your replies.

Dave.

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4 hours ago, D. Piolle said:

 

I wonder how to tighten it , unless one need to cut the instrument like on the picture :blink::wacko::P

 

There are two special open-end wrenches which look sort of like soundpost setters, but with an open-end wrench on the end. The wrench ends fit two hexagonal portions machined into the soundpost. One wrench is inserted through the bass ff hole, and holds one of the hexes stationary, while the other one is inserted through the treble ff and is used to turn a hex on the other side of the threaded portion.

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Not a turnbuckle.  It's much more similar to a screw-jack.  The more that I look at this thing, the more I feel that, in somewhat overenthusiastic hands, it could produce some really spectacular soundpost cracks.  :blink:

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It looks like a tool searching for a purpose.  The tests I have heard personally, or read about from trusted professionals, have overwhelmingly been negative in the sense that a well cut spruce post is superior in both sound quality and variety of sound options.  I certainly concede that it might have a benefit to some instrument, but I have not yet found a reason why or how.  For now it sits along side the "patented bassbar" although I do not think if installed properly it would not do any damage.  As a measuring instrument, the movable feet would seem to nullify that aspect, and the standard gauge or the old soundpost has worked great for years in the business and I imagine the 300 years preceding.  

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The idea that it might be used as a template to make a spruce post makes little sense to me. I've never had the skill to copy a post, with it's angles and length, accurately enough to fit properly. The real fitting will always be made by offering it up and cutting away the high spots. This is what can take time. The difference between a well fitted post, and one that doesn't fit at all is a whisper of wood.

I have a bundle of old posts in my drawer, and I'll often try a few to get a rough idea of the length.

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3 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

The idea that it might be used as a template to make a spruce post makes little sense to me. I've never had the skill to copy a post, with it's angles and length, accurately enough to fit properly.

I can usually copy an existing post pretty closely, using a caliper and an adjustable protractor.

But like Jerry says, the Anima Nova doesn't offer a convenient way to transfer the angles of the ends, to a wooden post (that I can think of). However, one might use it to find the length or tension which works best with a particular instrument, mark a precise spot at the soundpost location on the outside of the top and back, measure that distance with calipers, and make a wooden post which gives the same measurement.

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4 hours ago, David Burgess said:

I can usually copy an existing post pretty closely, using a caliper and an adjustable protractor.

But like Jerry says, the Anima Nova doesn't offer a convenient way to transfer the angles of the ends, to a wooden post (that I can think of). However, one might use it to find the length or tension which works best with a particular instrument, mark a precise spot at the soundpost location on the outside of the top and back, measure that distance with calipers, and make a wooden post which gives the same measurement.

If the little movable parts on the ends are stable enough when the post is removed through the soundhole, could the angles be replicated using a sliding bevel and then -- don't kill me, please, Jerry -- be transferred to a small mitre saw for the initial cutting of the post with subsequent adjustments made by hand?  I realize that initial "if" is a big one...

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7 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

If the little movable parts on the ends are stable enough when the post is removed through the soundhole, could the angles be replicated using a sliding bevel and then -- don't kill me, please, Jerry -- be transferred to a small mitre saw for the initial cutting of the post with subsequent adjustments made by hand?  I realize that initial "if" is a big one...

Sure you could Julian, but it is a $450.00+ experiment.  Then add the cost of the saw and the little disk sander that inevitably goes along with it.  The most important part is if you make your soundpost from spruce boards, and fit the soundpost with a knife or a chisel, you are constantly building a relationship with your tools...the better your relationship the better your work.

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3 minutes ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

Sure you could Julian, but it is a $450.00+ experiment.  Then add the cost of the saw and the little disk sander that inevitably goes along with it.  The most important part is if you make your soundpost from spruce boards, and fit the soundpost with a knife or a chisel, you are constantly building a relationship with your tools...the better your relationship the better your work.

Amen.  I used to 'fit' the angled ends of posts using a saw and sandpaper, but now that I've learned how to do it with a very sharp knife I will never touch the sandpaper or power tools again for this task.  And many others, for that matter.   Not only building a relationship with the tools, but through the tool, building a connection with the piece of wood that's going to be the 'soul' of the instrument...

I just can't imagine that an assembly of machined carbon fiber components is going to vibrate and transmit vibrations similarly to a well seasoned spruce post.  But maybe I'm lacking imagination!  

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1 hour ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

If the little movable parts on the ends are stable enough when the post is removed through the soundhole, could the angles be replicated using a sliding bevel and then -- don't kill me, please, Jerry -- be transferred to a small mitre saw for the initial cutting of the post with subsequent adjustments made by hand?  I realize that initial "if" is a big one...

Maybe... if one squeezed the bouts enough for the post to come completely loose, and was extremely careful not to let the ends touch anything as it was removed from the instrument. The ball ends move pretty darned easily though.

So what's needed is an additional mechanism in the post... sort of a drawbar arrangement which pulls the ball ends firmly into the socket, clamping them in place. :)

Or superglue might do it...

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