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Jacob

Translation please!

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c-bout = German "c-bogen"

I got that from the very useful term translator in "Useful Measurements For Violin Makers" by Henry Strobel, which I'd bet you have too.

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In german it's rather "Zarge(n)": Oberzarge, Mittelzarge, Unterzarge (upper, middle, lower) or "Bügel", accordingly Oberbügel, Mittel- or C-Bügel, Unterbügel. Bogen (bow) sounds somehow old fashioned, can't remember anybody using this word.

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I realise that the “German” speaking area, in reality, consists of many regional dialects. If you work in a violin shop, it also makes a big difference if the boss has a Markneukirchen or a Mittenwald background. Speaking for myself, living in Austria, I would call a middle bout „Mittel Bug“, and if anyone said „C-Bogen“, I would ask what on earth they were talking about.

 

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When I search walnut wood from germany, I can find it with both words.

Walnussholz and nussbaum holz.

Both seems to be walnut, but what is the diffirence?

I dont think its a fruit.

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25 minutes ago, Kimmo89 said:

When I search walnut wood from germany, I can find it with both words.

Walnussholz and nussbaum holz.

Both seems to be walnut, but what is the diffirence?

I dont think its a fruit.

Going into etymologie, Nuss is the general term for the fruits; Nussbaum describes all trees producing a nut, hazel or cobnut f.i., but not coconut, which is Palme, not Baum (unlike palm tree).

It's possible to say Nussbaum only, or Wallnuss (but not Wallnussbaum!) if the circumstances give evidence that the wood is meant and not the fruit or the tree as a whole plant, and usually everybody thinks of walnut in this regards (though theoretical it could be hazel, too). Wallnussholz is used by pedants only.B)

Reg. the bouts, all three words Bogen, Bügel, Bug are describung something which is bent, not straight, so they mean the same in this regards. Otherwise they mean a bow, a clothes hanger or the front of a boat. To clarify my translation above, the word Zarge means rather the side view, the rib, while the B words describe the outline of the plates.

Edited by Blank face

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33 minutes ago, Blank face said:

BTW, an exaggeration for fans of Mark Twain could be Wallnussbaumholzbrettabschnitt.;)

Translations of wood names can be a treacherous subject. (English) “Rosewood”, for instance is “Palisander” in German, although one can often, in catalogues, illiterate ebay listings etc. see it translated as “Rosenholz”: “Rosenholz” though, is something quite different, and is called “Tulipwood” in English. My ex-boss in Munich always used to get irritated when people asked what wood the white of some purfling was, after all, how can you tell by looking at such a tiny amount, which wood it is? He always used to (sarcastically) answer “Erdbeerbaum” (Strawberry tree) , since any dope knows that strawberries don't grow on trees. Imagine the long faces, when someone came around with a picture from the botanical gardens in Stuttgart of a plant that is actually called “Erdbeerbaum” in real life!

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Hilarious!

@Kimmo89

Yes, in this case you can be sure its from a walnut tree. Otherwise you may get Haselnuss (hazle nut) instead, but this is highly unlikly to be honest. 

I think I might get Mittel-Bug, but never heard of it before...

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On 18/08/2017 at 8:30 AM, Bruce Carlson said:

also les éclisses

Dear Bruce

Les éclisses means the whole" rib structure"

 for " the c bouts "  you can say " les échancrures " as mentioned by DGSR, otherwise " les C " .

some other French terms :

outline = contours

purflings = filets

neck angle = renversement ( du manche )

volute = volute

arching = voute

fingerboard = touche

neck = manche

front = table d ' harmonie

back =  fond ( table du fond )

blocks = tasseaux

linings = contre-éclisses

tailpiece = cordier

strings = cordes

tailpiece gut = attache-codier

saddle = sillet

bridge = chevalet

soundpost = âme ( meaning " soul " )

bass bar = barre d ' harmonie

spruce = épicéa

maple = érable

poplar = peuplier

willow = saule

fishtail = coulisse

label = étiquette

corners = coins

fluting = ragreyure - gorge

edgework = bords

pegs = chevilles

peg hole reamer = lousse

peg shaper = taille-chevilles

soundpost setter = pointe aux âmes

patch = doublure

neck graft = enture ( de tête )

varnish = vernis

dyes = colorants

colophony = colophane

linseed oil = huile de lin

walnut oil = huile de noix

marking gauge = trusquin

a plane = un rabot ( over n° 6 = "une Varlope" )

a ruler = une règle ( or "un réglet" )

straight edge = plat parfait

gouge = gouge

chisel = ciseau

knife = canif  ( kitchen knife = couteau )

file = lime

...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Interesting!  In my last German class I learned the verb for bend (biegen, biegt, bog, hat gebogen) but never made the connection with the word for violin bow (Violinbogen). 

Ed

 

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But my favorite Geman verb is Verschlimmbessern (verschlimmbessert, verschlimmbesserte, hat verschlimmbessert) which means, as I understand, to make something worse while trying to make it better.  There is no English word for that -but I know the feeling.  So when you are fitting an ivory face to a bow and decide it needs just one more stroke of the file to make it perfect but instead you make a huge scratch on the head, you can say "Ich habe den verdammten Violinbogen verschlimmbessert!".

Ed

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, D. Piolle said:

Dear Bruce

Les éclisses means the whole" rib structure"

 for " the c bouts "  you can say " les échancrures " as mentioned by DGSR, otherwise " les C " .

I understand that but in Jacobs question he gave that as an example so I thought I'd throw in les éclisses, as in la couronne d'éclisses.

Jacob's initial question: "Can somebody please provide a German or French term for "bout"? As in C-bout etc."

Bruce

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David,

How would you say "upper bouts", "middle bouts" and "lower bouts" in French? Sometimes, in English, these areas are associated to the human body and are called "shoulders", "waist" and "hips".

Bruce

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Yes it's about the same in French we often say :

les épaules = the shoulders

les hanches = the hips

and we can say " le buste " = the waist  but more often " la poitrine " which more or less means the chest (or breasts) ....

like a big patch between the f-holes is referred as " une pièce de poitrine" or " un doublage de poitrine ".

David.

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