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violinsRus

Transitional bow of interest

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Here is something of interest to me, and looks pretty neat, if nothing else.  I've seen swan head bows before, but never something shaped quite like this.  Overall bow length is 28-7/8", and the bow weighs 51.25 grams in the current condition, basically without hair or grip.  I don't see any sign that it had a grip, and there is not a lot of heavy wear other than worn off finish.  But what a thick stick for the weight!  11mm at the tallest, and 10.6mm width.  Even at the middle of the bow it's still almost 10mm high.  The screw is frozen/rusted in, and I'm hesitant to force it.  It's octagonal all the way to the tip.  Bauwaua wood?  Heavily champfered, tapered champfer.    The ferrule is a brassy color where it's visible under the corrosion, and the screw and slide are ivory.  Opinions welcome!

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Probably. They  are basically transitional bows  which kept being produced until late in the 19th century and later (often ultra cheap terrible stuff.) . If the bow is an earlier one it may be cut curved from theCapture1.JPG.32abad387d169bf302c104923e77161c.JPG bow plank ,instead of being heat bent  .

Id like to thank Kai Koepp for his research into this area of bowmaking.

 

Koepp_Beethoven_and_Biedermeier_bow.pdf

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The Stainer Brand appeared somehow later. Interesting is that the head features some reminiscent of the Kramer head type.

It's really hard to date this kind of bow, but I would assume it to be rather before 1850, and it's not completely excluded that it's of a Mittenwald origin. Could you please measure how broad is the "track" under the frog, in metric mm?

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7 minutes ago, Blank face said:

The Stainer Brand Apparat somehow later. Interesting is that the head features some reminiscent of the Kramer head type.

It's really hard to date this kind of bow, but I would assume it to be rather before 1850, and it's not completely excluded that it's of a Mittenwald origin. Could you please measure how broad is the "track" under the frog, in metric mm?

BF , according to Kai the use of mother of pearl  and ferrules are slightly later . Also the Mittenwald track ends slightly short of the end of the bow. Im still a little unclear about the Austrian ones. Wettengel (Markneukirchen maker in the article who published his book in 1828)describes these Cramer  variation heads as Viennese style.

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34 minutes ago, Blank face said:

The Stainer Brand Apparat somehow later. Interesting is that the head features some reminiscent of the Kramer head type.

It's really hard to date this kind of bow, but I would assume it to be rather before 1850, and it's not completely excluded that it's of a Mittenwald origin. Could you please measure how broad is the "track" under the frog, in metric mm?

3.4 to 3.5mm track width.

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4 hours ago, violinsRus said:

3.4 to 3.5mm track width.

According to Koepp page11 the Saxon track or "tongue " is supposed to be more narrow, 2,3 - 2,7 mm. Maybe the wider track is an evidence for a south German or Austrian origin of this bow , as well as the "Viennese " head style?

Another unusual feature is the very sudden end of the "Karnice" slide; I'm used to see them longer (under the lapping) and fading more gently.

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