Sign in to follow this  
Greg F.

another bow

Recommended Posts

Brad,

Thanks for the detailed info.  Very informative.  All I had to go on were side views of a some auction bow pictures.  The Tarisio site has a number of Otto Hoyer bows shown a couple of which, to my eyes, have heavy thumb projections that are roughly parallel with the stick and that's the only similarity that I picked up on.  I wasn't claiming it was a Hoyer bow,  just that I noted some similarity of the frog shapes with one or two shown by Tarisio.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brad, do you know if the what you call the oblique thumb projection is original?  I know a famous player promoted the fad of filing away thumb projections. Or did Hoyer make them that way to satisfy the fad for this type of thumb projection. Ive lost count of the number of bows from all schools that have been vandalised very crudely on the thumb projection.

Im sure ive seen Hoyers with more standard type frogs but cant remember, maybe just different members of the family. Most ive had have been the ones with the cross and initials stamped near the button.

I assume the narrow ebony ring was borrowed off the  Bausch shop way of doing it.. Alot of the Hoyer heads remind me of some Prosper Colas heads .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, fiddlecollector said:

Brad, do you know if the what you call the oblique thumb projection is original?...

I have seen so many Otto Hoyer bows with this feature that I am quite sure it is original.  As further confirmation, I note that Otto Hoyer bow with this feature is pictured in Grunke's "German Bow Makers" book.  I can't imagine that the book would have shown a bow altered in this way.  But I have also seen Otto Hoyer bows with standard frogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, fiddlecollector said:

...Im sure ive seen Hoyers with more standard type frogs but cant remember, maybe just different members of the family. Most ive had have been the ones with the cross and initials stamped near the button...

According to the Grunke book, the cross consists of two crossed bows, and these bows came from the workshop of Carl Adorf Hoyer.  The one pictured in the book has a standard straight thumb projection on the frog.  In the United States, Otto Hoyer bows seem to be much more common than C A Hoyers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I have seen so many Otto Hoyer bows with this feature that I am quite sure it is original.  As further confirmation, I note that Otto Hoyer bow with this feature is pictured in Grunke's "German Bow Makers" book.  I can't imagine that the book would have shown a bow altered in this way.  But I have also seen Otto Hoyer bows with standard frogs.

Thanks Brad,  so it may be possible he was making them that  way to cater for the craze in filed down thumb projections. Many German unknown workshop bows seem to have ridiculously shallow thumb projections which seem very prone to cracking due to lack of support for the underslide. Though the Hoyer way seems to leave more material there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

According to the Grunke book, the cross consists of two crossed bows, and these bows came from the workshop of Carl Adorf Hoyer.  The one pictured in the book has a standard straight thumb projection on the frog.  In the United States, Otto Hoyer bows seem to be much more common than C A Hoyers.

I guess thats right ,at least in the UK. the ones with the crossed bows seem very common.The others like you seem to come across don`t seem so common over here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Greg F. said:

I sent an email to Mr. Gruenke and will let you know if he has anything to say.

I enjoy noodling with old bows and here's a no-name one that looked to have good wood.  I added the thumb piece, copper wire and hair.  The tip plate was only half there (I crudely kludged an extra bit onto the tip).   Nothing extraordinary, but if someone has an opinion on the type of wood that would be appreciated.

img174.thumb.jpg.5832937aecca824c39a69d7d9fb6335b.jpgimg175.jpg.7bb00057800b6f4ecfd169c4deba579a.jpg

 

 

A couple more pics under different lighting.  I'd like for this one to be pernambuco but I'm not sure.

P1030949.thumb.JPG.1fbd2cab017ad13a0e9b98b03c799d1a.JPGP1030950.thumb.JPG.1ce107bc0ef06c64467b0efdab7f95f0.JPGP1030953.thumb.JPG.3251e29f9326a6d7eabb7bc980b0d1f3.JPGP1030952.thumb.JPG.131f823ec07dbea405c56d887e70611e.JPG

P1030951.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a bow stamped "Robert Hoyer" and "Czslovakia" under the frog. I don't know if Robert Hoyer was a real maker, or a brand name for the Metropolitan Music Co. that distributed "his" bows. Any relation to Otto or other Hoyers?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

I have a bow stamped "Robert Hoyer" and "Czslovakia" under the frog. I don't know if Robert Hoyer was a real maker, or a brand name for the Metropolitan Music Co. that distributed "his" bows. Any relation to Otto or other Hoyers?

 

I've had a few Robert Hoyer bows.  I'm pretty sure that this was a trade name -- not an actual maker.  Yes, they apparently were distributed in the US by Metropolitan, as I see them listed in the 1935 Metropolitan catalog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Brad Dorsey said:

Like this?

 

yes but now when i look  i can hardly find any photos of the colas heads like that. this one looks similar.  Though many colas heads are tall and thin looking.

Hoyer top, Colas below.

 

 

 

hoyer colas.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No word from Mr. Gruenke to my out-of-the-blue email.  Not surprising as it is understandably best for him to ignore such inquiries.

I have a question about screws for the underslide.  Is there a date at which such screws came into general use?  What are the various metals used for such:  brass, nickel, silver, other?  Is a particular metal more common to a particular school or country?  Does the location of the screws relative to the eyelet mean anything?  Just wondering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rehaired my bow and though it's rather light (about 54.5 grams) it seems to draw a good sound and works well with my newbie repertoire (mostly fiddle tunes).  So I'm happy, even if I don't know who made it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.