Delabo

18th century Sradivarius copies

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I have been researching 18th century Stradivarius copies,and have just about exhausted the usual Italian makers such as the Gagliano family and Guadagnini etc,but I wondered if perhaps there were German,French,Fussen,Bohemian or other places that made either direct or  Stradivari  influenced copies during this period ?

Very grateful for any knowledge that you wish to share.

Edited by Delabo

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11 hours ago, Delabo said:

Very grateful for any knowledge that you wish to share.

This won't be knowledge, just words from an old book though the following were listed as imitators or copiest' of Stradivari during the 1700's.

Gabbicellis, Giovanni di  Florence 1720

Garani, Michael Angelo Bologna 1720 Strad and D.G.

Geisenhof, Franz Vienna  into the 19th century

Hassert, Eisenach 1743 good imitator of old Cremonas

Otto, Jacob Gotha 1765-1830 excellent imitator, Ernst was teacher.

I noticed Contreras, Storioni and Panormo but they weren't listed as Stradivari imitators.   A very many French makers listed as excellent but they were influenced by Amati or Stainer mostly, along with a little Guarneri here and there.. 

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16 hours ago, uncle duke said:

This won't be knowledge, just words from an old book though the following were listed as imitators or copiest' of Stradivari during the 1700's.

Gabbicellis, Giovanni di  Florence 1720

Garani, Michael Angelo Bologna 1720 Strad and D.G.

Geisenhof, Franz Vienna  into the 19th century

Hassert, Eisenach 1743 good imitator of old Cremonas

Otto, Jacob Gotha 1765-1830 excellent imitator, Ernst was teacher.

I noticed Contreras, Storioni and Panormo but they weren't listed as Stradivari imitators.   A very many French makers listed as excellent but they were influenced by Amati or Stainer mostly, along with a little Guarneri here and there.. 

Thanks for your reply,I have searched the internet for the makers you quoted but I have found out very little about them up till now.

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19 hours ago, uncle duke said:

This won't be knowledge, just words from an old book though the following were listed as imitators or copiest' of Stradivari during the 1700's.

Gabbicellis, Giovanni di  Florence 1720

Garani, Michael Angelo Bologna 1720 Strad and D.G.

Geisenhof, Franz Vienna  into the 19th century

Hassert, Eisenach 1743 good imitator of old Cremonas

Otto, Jacob Gotha 1765-1830 excellent imitator, Ernst was teacher.

I noticed Contreras, Storioni and Panormo but they weren't listed as Stradivari imitators.   A very many French makers listed as excellent but they were influenced by Amati or Stainer mostly, along with a little Guarneri here and there.. 

In Brompton's book of violin and bow makers by John Dilworth, neither of these are listed as copyists of Stradivari, except for Geissenhoff who began making Strad models after 1800. Which makes sense since Stradivari was relatively unknown before, say, 1780's when Pique and Lupot began making Stradivari copies. I believe that they were the first to copy Stradivari in the modern sense. Stradivari and later Guarneri violins became popular around that time in Paris. Paris became the commercial centre of violins about that time. Very few reputable Italian makers were active in the late 17th century and most of them worked on Amati and Stainer models. I think it's safe to say that Stradivari copies were unheard of before Pique-Lupot. 

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Daniel Parker was making his versions of Stradivari's long pattern, in London from around 1705. It is reputed that the violin, or violins used by Visconti at the time he visited London, were the basis for a new direction in Parkers work. There are a small group of other London makers, who had workshops in close proximity to each other, which too begin to display some Stradivarian traits from 1705 onwards.

Ultimately, most of this was swept away, as the fashion for Stainer models increased in England through the 1720's, and into the 1730's.

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How about Jean-Francois Aldric?  Listed by Brompton's as making "mostly" Stradivari influenced instruments, beginning towards the end of the 18th century and into the 19th century

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Yes. Aldric, of course. I should have said Pique, Lupot and Aldric. The way I interpret the OP's question was if there was makers who copied Stradivari. Like, really copied his instruments. That came about in France in the late 1700's.

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Gabriel David Buchstetter in Regensburg was one of the first German language area makers to start using a Strad (long pattern) outline, arching and f-hole model in the 1750's. 

 

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