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Authenticating Joseph Guarnerius violin 1743


stompwaffles
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It would probably cost more than $1000.00 dollars to do all the work needed on this violin.  It would seem to need a new fingerboard apart from the more obvious things.  In any case please do not feel insulted by any of us, as it belonged to your grandfather I am sure it has much emotional value to you.  I am not sure how familiar you are with violins, but it was very common to put a label in of a famous maker as a tribute to the model the factory was using.  This company was honest in that it did say the violin was made in Germany and not in Cremona, Italy.  A real Guarneri violin would be worth well into ten million dollars or more.  Thanks for coming by, You did a great job on the pictures by the way.

 

DLB

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1 minute ago, Dwight Brown said:

It would probably cost more than $1000.00 dollars to do all the work needed on this violin.  It would seem to need a new fingerboard apart from the more obvious things.  In any case please do not feel insulted by any of us, as it belonged to your grandfather I am sure it has much emotional value to you.

 

DLB

I did not mean to insult in any way. 

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2 minutes ago, WorksAsIntended said:

I did not mean to insult in any way. 

Of course not!  i did not read anyones post in that way at all.  I meant only to be polite.  As a a long time teacher I guess I have had to let an awful lot of people down gently about family instruments.  Just my way I guess.

DLB

Sorry If I implied otherwise.

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I think that's not quite right.  As I understand it:  1. First the law required imported merchandise to be labeled with the country of origin.  2. Then the law was changed to require the words "made in."  I'm not sure of the dates -- I'm sure they can be looked up --, but this violin would have been imported sometime between #1 and #2, since it says "GERMANY" not "MADE IN GERMANY."

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24 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I think that's not quite right.  As I understand it:  1. First the law required imported merchandise to be labeled with the country of origin.  2. Then the law was changed to require the words "made in."  I'm not sure of the dates -- I'm sure they can be looked up --, but this violin would have been imported sometime between #1 and #2, since it says "GERMANY" not "MADE IN GERMANY."

Yup, sorry, I must have imagined the "Made in" bit. Here is what I found. So the violin would likely be pre 1914.

The McKinley Tariff Act of 1891 required that items imported to the U.S. be marked with their country of origin. In 1914 the act was revised to require the words "Made in" to also be used. Finally, in 1921 the act was revised yet again to require that all country names occurred in English. Thus an object labeled simply "Bavaria" of "Nippon" would likely (but not absolutely) be from some time between 1891 and 1914. "Made in Italia" might be before 1921. 

It seems likely that any item marked "Made in Japan" was probably made or imported after 1921. Prior to 1921, they might have been labeled "Made in Nippon." We also know that after WWII and during the US occupation of Japan, items that were made for export were marked "Made in Occupied Japan" or perhaps "Occupied Japan."

Similarly, items labeled "Made in Germany" are likely manufactured between 1921 and WWII.

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You might be able to get something for free or low fee, or even a set of strings (for their next violin) . When I spent too much time at a SoCal violin shop, multiple customers would come by with violins and violas that were dropped, sat on, run over, etc., and were deemed way too expensive to repair.  They didn't know what to do with them except hang  on a wall or make a planter. I suggested that they might donate to an apprentice luthier for restoration, or to a violin school for same.  Perhaps you could coordinate with your "friendly neighborhood violin shoppe?" And perhaps donate the successful restoration to a school music program. Everyone wins.

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  • 3 years later...
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Yes it's a mess.  Can you please tell me why they put a label for Giuseppe Guarnerius and date it 1726?  Unless that is not the year?  Thanks for your help.

 

Grandma also left us a Neuner & Hornsteiner Mittenwald violin, dated 1904, but I don't know much about that one either.  I had it restored completely for only $100.  I was told it was a nice one.  It's a mystery to us why she bought violins!  Do you have any suggestions about where to sell it?

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8 hours ago, Becky Green said:

Yes it's a mess.  Can you please tell me why they put a label for Giuseppe Guarnerius and date it 1726?  Unless that is not the year?  Thanks for your help.

The label indicates what they were trying to copy at the German workshop, although copy can only be rather loosely applied. 1726 was probably just picked as a date during his lifetime, for the label.
The violin does not look like a Guarneri from the 1720's, it's just a stylised workshop Guarneri pattern.

Guiseppe Guarnerius, commonly known as Guarneri del Gesú, is one of the most famous Italian violin makers, after Stradivari. He worked through the later 1710's to 1744.

Your violin is German, and around 100 years old.

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