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thirteenthsteph

Kavakos' new 1734 ‘Willemotte’ Strad

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There are great violins from that vintage, such as the Habeneck, but how much of them are by Antonio himself or are they mostly by Antonio's sons Omobono and Francesco?

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I think its at least a continues change in craft quality during the late period. That can mean he did less with every instrument or his sons made more on them, who knows. 

Sadly I only found this "recording": 

If not played good it does not sound good, who knew. 

 

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3 hours ago, WorksAsIntended said:

I think its at least a continues change in craft quality during the late period. That can mean he did less with every instrument or his sons made more on them, who knows. 

Sadly I only found this "recording": 

If not played good it does not sound good, who knew. 

 

I can make a Strad sound just the same as any violin in my shop. I have that "gift".

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^ Incredible gift. :lol:

I thought I found a new video with Kavakos, but it turns out it was from 2015. I guess we just have to wait for new material to appear. The Abergavenny to my ears did not sound as good as the Falmouth, but I'm really interested in hearing this one... I'm not sure I can fairly compare though, just an impression.

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2 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

This does not sound anything like Pugnani's compositions to me.  I am almost 100% sure it's fake.

? I only listened to the Praelludium and the beginning of the Allegro but its exactly the piece. Although with partly poor intonation its exactly how I remeber it. 

And yes, its by Kreisler. 

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Kavakos has made a beautiful sound with both the "Falmouth" and the "Abergavenny".  So he has had two supremely successful instruments.  He has, to my knowledge, never explained why he changes instruments.  Maybe he finds it stimulating to change and see what he can accomplish with a different instrument from time to time.

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@gowanI think he always wanted one from the 'golden period' of Stradivari? I might be wrong. But that would be the Abergavenny. So perhaps now that he satiated that desire, he changed again based on that lasting first impression the Willemotte made on him. I don't know. I guess change is always stimulating, as you said, considering he probably has access to any such instrument as soon as it becomes available.

@MANFIO He definitely does. He's in a class of his own for me, especially after hearing him live in a masterclass. I think he used his Greiner then though (not sure).

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10 minutes ago, MANFIO said:

Kavakos also uses a "bow vibrato" on the G string, I think just he does that. 

Some of Josef Gingold's students do that as well - it is known as "roulé bowing", which is described in Lucien Capet's Superior Bowing Technique, a book which Gingold strongly encouraged his students to read.

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4 minutes ago, devaraja42 said:

Some of Josef Gingold's students do that as well - it is known as "roulé bowing", which is described in Lucien Capet's Superior Bowing Technique, a book which Gingold strongly encouraged his students to read.

Thanks for the info!

 

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14 hours ago, thirteenthsteph said:

I'm changing my mind about the Abergavenny. So much sound with so little bow! 

 

And why do you think "so much sound with so little bow" is attributable to the violin and not the violinist?
Have you never heard "It's not the arrow, it's the Indian"..?

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Indeed.  I always think about the Heifetz story... 

 

"Oh, Mr. Heifetz, your violin tonight, it just sounded amazing!"

To which Mr. Heifetz replies by raising the violin to his ear, listening carefully, and then, "Funny, I don't hear anything."

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5 hours ago, AtlVcl said:

And why do you think "so much sound with so little bow" is attributable to the violin and not the violinist?
Have you never heard "It's not the arrow, it's the Indian"..?

Its simply all three factors, the player, the violin and the bow. If one cant do it, it will not work. Of course Kavakos is excellent in doing this, but surely also in chossing equipment that can do it. 

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I wonder to what degree violinists like Joshua Bell and Kavakos are being expertly played by the London violin business. 

They're the poster boys for the notion that great violinists are never satisfied with the Strad they have; they need a bigger more expensive Strad.

They're also, obviously poster boys for the myth that you don't even need to think about a major career without being able to advertise a major Strad of Guarnerius in the program notes.

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@Herman West I don't know about Bell, but Kavakos owns a few modern instruments, which I doubt he would not use were they better than the Abergavenny or the Willemotte or whatever. He definitely seems to have a fascination with Strads, though, and if I were in his position, I'd definitely jump on the chance to play as many of them and change as I pleased. So both ends use each other for their own gain, but I find it hard to believe that such a person is simply being played or a 'poster boy' for any such thing, and that is based on my general impressions of his character, he is an... interesting fellow. I might be naive, and this is just speculation, but in this case it doesn't seem that way to me.

 

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1 hour ago, Herman West said:

I wonder to what degree violinists like Joshua Bell and Kavakos are being expertly played by the London violin business. 

They're the poster boys for the notion that great violinists are never satisfied with the Strad they have; they need a bigger more expensive Strad.

They're also, obviously poster boys for the myth that you don't even need to think about a major career without being able to advertise a major Strad of Guarnerius in the program notes.

This video comes to mind ...

 

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