Rue

Getting more practice before making a violin repair ;)

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Rue   

My daughter has reclaimed her coffee table from my living room. I went to reclaim my coffee table from storage.

It has a broken leg support. 

I have no tools or real know-how to fix this.

Glue? Wood glue? Gorilla glue? New screws? Drill new holes and rescrew?

Whatever the most straightforward repair  is would be best for me and my limited repair skills.

This is an unattractive oval French provincial coffee table that used to be my Grandmother's (circa 1972). I don't particularly like it (and it needs to be refinished one day) but it's still too good/solid to be tossed out so I am willing to give it a shot.. 

 

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deans   

Not good practice for violin repair, maybe viola repair, they are much more similar to coffee tables

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...far, far from a violin repair indeed!

Rue, the simplest thing to do there would be unscrew that piece of wood that is broken altogether (from the leg and from the table), use some SuperGlue to glue it back together, wait for it to cure, then screw it all back in place.

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30 minutes ago, Rue said:

My daughter has reclaimed her coffee table from my living room. I went to reclaim my coffee table from storage.

It has a broken leg support. 

I have no tools or real know-how to fix this.

Glue? Wood glue? Gorilla glue? New screws? Drill new holes and rescrew?

Whatever the most straightforward repair  is would be best for me and my limited repair skills.

This is an unattractive oval French provincial coffee table that used to be my Grandmother's (circa 1972). I don't particularly like it (and it needs to be refinished one day) but it's still too good/solid to be tossed out so I am willing to give it a shot..

Remove the piece attached to the leg with the wingnut, remove the other two wood screws, and glue and clamp it back into its original position on the table. After the glue has dried, reinsert the two wood screws. Titebond should work fine for this.

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Rue   

Perfect! Thank you everyone. I will let you know if I succeed. :)

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3 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Remove the piece attached to the leg with the wingnut, remove the other two wood screws, and glue and clamp it back into its original position on the table. After the glue has dried, reinsert the two wood screws. Titebond should work fine for this.

This is a good approach.  But the "other two wood screws" appear to have pulled out of their holes in the table apron.  This means that the internal threads in those holes are stripped, and if you just reinsert the screws they won't have any holding power in the stripped holes.  You can restore their holding power by inserting something like pieces of a wood tooth picks in the holes before reinserting the screws, as Addie says below.

Also note that the heads of those screws are designed to be driven by a special type of screw driver that is neither a standard flat blade nor a standard phillips head screw driver.  I think the type required is called a Torx.  If you don't have the right type of screw driver, you will have to get one at a hardware store.  Bring the screws to the store to be sure of getting the right screw driver.

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Addie   

Use wood glue.

Unscrew the leg, and set it aside.

Back out the screws from the broken bit. 

Glue a splinter of wood in each screw hole, and trim/break the splinter flush.

Put lots of glue on the break on both pieces, and on the table skirt and where the broken bit touches the skirt.

Clamp broken bit in place, and tighten the original screws.

Wipe up any excess glue, especially where the leg goes.

Let sit overnight.

Reattach leg.

Voila!  Ugly hand-me-down coffee table.

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Addie   

Yes, they are torx head screws.

If the lower part of the block is loose, remove it, and glue the two halves together, let sit overnight, reinstall with glue, slivers, screws, and let sit overnight.  You'll still wind up with a hand-me-down coffee table from the '70's.  :lol:

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Those screw heads needs what called a double square bit, not the torx.  Some screws are sorta mangled already, may as well use what will fit to turn to tighten.  

I once read somewhere that someone was going to make a violin neck from a table leg.:P  

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Televet   
6 minutes ago, caerolle said:

I would be truly disappointed if this didn't somehow involve Saran Wrap and plaster-of-Paris...

:D

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I'll add that after gluing and clamping, immediately clean any excess glue from the recess where the leg bolts on. You don't want to need to remove that glue after it has dried, in order to get the leg to fit back in place properly.

(Oops, now I see that Addie already mentioned that. Unless he addied it later)

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MikeC   

duct tape would work....     just kidding.   Do not use super glue it won't work for this,  I can't think of any applications that it's good for except for lifting fingerprints from crime scenes.   Don't us gorilla glue, it expands many times it's original volume so if you use too much it will make a mess on the outside visible part of the table.   So use a good wood glue and the joint will be stronger than the wood itself.  The best thing would be to replace the broken block, otherwise wood glue and screws.   I would take the screws out and move them a little lower rather than fill in the holes and keep them where they are.   Why is there a wing nut on a bolt.  Where is the other end of the bolt,  what is it's purpose?

Oh and those screws are too short,  you should replace them with longer ones, just not too long that it goes all the way through to the outside.  And if you do move them you'll need to drill a pilot hole otherwise you'll split that block.  

 

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1 hour ago, MikeC said:

Why is there a wing nut on a bolt.  Where is the other end of the bolt,  what is it's purpose?

It makes the legs detachable, probably for shipping purposes originally.

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13 hours ago, Rue said:

Perfect! Thank you everyone. I will let you know if I succeed. :)

If you do not and IF you need David to come over and help, keep the air-conditioning on.

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First glance I thought that was a violin neck and it had been screwed on - wow... then it came into focus. Second look and the grain on that top made me thinks - hmm, broken table, maybe it could be repurposed into a bass top plate!

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All of the screws are too short and need to be replaced, they should go at least 3/4 of the way through, that's the original problem, it probably didn't take much of a bump to break this..Sheetrock grabbers would be better than what is there, they have widely spaced threads and hold quite well.

Mr Duke is right, those are square head screws, not torx..

I wouldn’t glue anything but the broken piece of wood, in fact just longer screws would render it almost as strong as original without any glue due to the forces involved. (fill the old holes that have stripped out)

It looks like a solid wood table and as it is could be very nice refinished properly instead of the industrial  markie finish that it now has.

If someone later wants to fix it up properly, they will cuss the hack that put a bunch of glue everywhere and made it difficult to take the aprons back apart to refinish it. I used to refinish a lot of peoples furniture,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,(pause here and think about hacked up repairs on a violin and how much it can annoy a person) There are proper ways to repair furniture believe it or not.

One day all solid wood tables will be seen as valuable as we turn into particle board and plastic bandits.

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After ya get that *$&%$ backin piece glued the $*#&$ up, turn that *$*%$ ninety degrees for more strength, if the ($*#&& is square.*

*Shop guy language.

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9 minutes ago, Evan Smith said:

 

Mr Duke is right, those are square head screws, not torx..

 

Where does "Duke" say that? Maybe I missed something?

I'd also identify them as torx-headed screws, easily distinguishable from square-drive screws.

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3 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Where does "Duke" say that? Maybe I missed something?

I'd also identify them as torx-headed screws, easily distinguishable from square-drive screws.

I suppose it's not easy enough.

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19 hours ago, uncle duke said:

Those screw heads needs what called a double square bit, not the torx.  Some screws are sorta mangled already, may as well use what will fit to turn to tighten.  

I once read somewhere that someone was going to make a violin neck from a table leg.:P  

Square bit. not torx.

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The *$&# screws are 8 point double &$^# square, not (*#& 6 point torx.  Looks like they only go 1/8" into the wood, so you could rplace them with longer good ol' regular screws.  OTOH they're probably short to keep the leg breaking off from breaking the side of the table...

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MikeC   

Those screws clearly have more than 4 indentations,  they are what I call star screws.   If Strad had used these instead of those silly nails his necks wouldn't have come off.  

square_star.jpg

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