lpr5184

Perry Sultana...

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3 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

Jackson,

Yes the bolts establish the rib heights and wood blocks would also work. I believe the C&J Book show wood screws but I like the machine bolts because they are pretty quick to adjust.

Michael,

I haven't actually been to Bruce's place but would like to make the trip. From what I've heard from others he has a lot of wood to choose from. Seems like a great guy.

He is that indeed. The main issue with his "wood barn" would be making it through it and the stacks in less than a week of full time endeavor. My strategy is "Here's what I'm looking for Mate" and then to follow obediently and carefully into the maize...... Lucky for me I'm only "one island over". The drive from the ferry is longer than the ferry ride.... and through Moran State Park, so lovely, and even more so with this retirement thing going on and "nothing better [or needed] to do today".

 

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lpr5184   

Eugene recommends weighing the glue and water when mixing and that's what I do. I have never had any failures or problems using his glue. Here are a few pics of the blocks being glued to the form...I make fresh small batches at a time and discard any leftovers when done.

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lpr5184   

One nice feature when using a half or full template is eliminating the need for individual corner and end block templates since everything is on the template itself.

Before using the half template I level the blocks to the correct height on a glass plate. Then lay the half template on the form and trace around all of the blocks. Flip the template over and mark the opposite sides...

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lpr5184   

Finishing the endblocks on the spindle sander requires an additional step to remove any lumps and bumps. I use a wooden block that has been planed square and flat and attach sandpaper to it with Gorrilla duck tape. I used to apply spray adhesive but the Gorrilla tape holds well and is less messy.

Do this on a flat surface and raise the form off the surface a little bit...plywood works well for this.

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lpr5184   

I don't know why but figuring out how to finish the top block has had me scratching my head for awhile...so far here is where I'm at with it....

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JoeDeF   
23 hours ago, lpr5184 said:

Someone here recently asked me about using hide glue because they don't have much experience with it. I sent them Eugene Thordahl's - HIDE GLUE - 40 Centuries Old And Still Holding...and here some info on mixing ratio's...

I had forgotten about this.  Thanks for reminding me; it is a good resource.

The part I enjoy the most is the "Moisture Resistant Joints" section, which reads:

Quote

There are many instances in which, through trade demands, a moisture-resistant joint is desired.  Hide glue is readily made moisture-resistant through a simple, practical method which has been employed for many years.  The need for moisture-resistant joints, except for a few sub-tropical areas, has been greatly exaggerated.  Furniture and musical instrument assemblies using unmodified hide glues have for many decades successfully withstood all usual climatic conditions the world over.

When added moisture resistance is desired, the following procedure is recommended:

     1. Select the type and test grade of glue normally required.

     2. Prepare the warm glue solution following standard procedures.

 

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lpr5184   

Then I'll thickness them and finish with a scraper.  Sometimes I'll  use a wooden block with sandpaper to evenly thickness the ribs to within a couple of tenths. But I always finish with a scraper.

Here I'm using an old Starrett 194 universal scraper I recently bought on Ebay. It works pretty good and the blade is very easy to sharpen.

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lpr5184   

While finishing the ribs I noticed something very different with this maple. Rather than nice crisp curls when scraping all I could really get was powder. At first I thought my scraper was dull so I resharpened  and got the same results,.. just fine powder.

Then I tried some other maples and all of them scraped cleanly with nice curls so I knew my scraper was sharp and working properly. Then I remembered that the wood is processed in a way that removes the moisture but differently than torrifeed wood.

So I grabbed some torrefied hard maple and some European that Don Noon torrefied for me and scraped. Again just powder...no curly shavings.  I don't know the reason but I found this very interesting. I also found a huge difference in the flexibility of torrefied vs Old Standards processed wood.  John explained to me the differences between his process and torrefaction. It was a very interesting conversation and I'm looking forward to putting the gouges to the wood.

The maple on the left is unprocessed European and on the right is torrefied hard maple...

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That's very interesting, E. I spoke with John about it also, and saw a picture of his really sci-fi looking vacuum chamber. I'm hoping to try some of his red maple and red spruce soon. Do you find his stuff more or less flexible, with regards to rib stock. I see you mentioned it's hard maple, which I would guess is even more stiff than softer maples. 

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lpr5184   

The hard maple in the photo is torrefied and not John's. The wood I got from John is northern red maple. And yes it is way more flexible than any maple I have worked with. I imagine it has to be when bending ribs for an F5 mandolin. I don't think you could ever bend torrefied maple that tight. My understanding is John's process doesn't cook the wood or destroy the cells it only removes the moisture. I think you will definitely notice a difference. I had to pay a little more because I asked for his best wood and this came from his personal stash.

 

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lpr5184   

After bending the ribs and clamping into place I let them dry before gluing to the blocks. Then when gluing the ribs to the form I try to keep them flat against the form and 90 degrees to the flat surface.

 

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lpr5184   

Installing carbon fiber reinforcing rings on the endblock...

I remove the block from the form and mark the endpin hole position. Then drill an 1/8 inch pilot hole

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Then using the Peg Ringer tool I drill the recess on both sides of the block004.JPG.a58a45aeda3b5b08cdedad5e54e0583b.JPG

I use epoxy to glue in the rings. I'll mask off the block and then use the tool again to mark making sure there is no tape left in the recesses

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Epoxy is applied and the rings are tapped in with a hammer. I'm careful not to get any glue in the center hole010.JPG.5bc9ff19d006ecb87b5a6227f7cde590.JPG

Glue is cleaned off and tape is removed012.JPG.d0ecbea10b14f1fd9909d604fcfde888.JPG

When dry the endpin hole can be enlarged and the block can be glued back to the form.

 

 

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