lpr5184

Perry Sultana...

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At the moment I'm a bit puzzled about finishing the form in this area...These next questions are aimed at Conor. I don't want to bother him with messages so I thought I would post this and let him chime in when he gets time.

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Instead of the straight horizontal cuts in towards the button I'd like to make the upper ribs extend right up to the neck in a single curve.  I don't have a photo of the top of the upper rib area but I assume they just added some matching rib stock to fill in.

I was thinking something like this but I'm unsure if this is a good idea.

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In this photo it appears that the neck is not mortised into the top block so I'd like to know if the replaced neck is nailed on.

 

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Perry's necks are always nailed. The inside work is very consistent and tidy. 

I think that, were I making a Sultana, I'd make a little step in from the ribs like the one above. If I wanted a smaller Button, I'd make the block just a little narrower at the back, like a bass. Com's has been cut to match a viola neck, I think losing an element of the original design. I'd probably attach the neck with a screw, but that's just me! It could equally be let in, in the modern manner.

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Afraid not. 

Most Perry tailpiece are ebony, with two holes for an ordinary gut. You'll knock one up in no time.

I've only seen the silver wire and plate on the fancy shmancy ivory veneered ones.

 

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After cutting out on the band saw the template is fastened to the form and the edges are finished flush. Many methods work but this is how I do it.

I first use a spindle sander to get as close to the template as possible without touching it. You can hear the spindle touch the aluminum so that is a good gauge to stop.  After this I remove the sanding sleeve and finish on a flat surface by hand, checking often to make sure the edge is flat and square.

 

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The outline and edgework of the form is completed. The next and final steps are to mark and cut out the corner and end block openings.

Before cutting the block openings I'll seal the entire form.  I'll brush two coats of Anchorseal and let dry. Anchorseal is used to seal end grain on green wood to prevent checking. It's a waterbased wax emulsion and I've found it works great on forms to prevent any hide glue from sticking. Two coats will soak into the wood and not leave any significant buildup on the surface. In addition between builds I will reapply to the form Renaissance  or Johnsons Paste Wax.  

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My apologies for dragging the form making process out but someone asked me privately if I would document how I build my forms and templates so I agreed. I promise to shift into a higher gear once the form is completed.

To be honest I do enjoy this part of the process and my personal feeling is a well built form contributes a lot to the flow of work and final outcome of the fiddle.

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Please don't apologize, everything you do is cool to see,,, I am constantly learning, you spur me on to greater heights!

If there is some sorry sack of lumpy oatmeal that gets annoyed by what you do they can change the channel.

Any urge that you have to share,,,,, is fine with most everyone here !!!!!!

Can I hear an amen !

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On 10/5/2017 at 9:57 PM, lpr5184 said:

The block openings and clamping holes are cut out then the leveling bolts are drilled.

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Your leveling bolts w/ wing nuts looks like a much simpler way than my wood screws.  That's why you should keep posting the simple mundane parts.  It tends to be where I find the nuggets of gold.

-Jim

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Oh OK, here's a little ditty I like to do when making a form...

After laying out the position of the the leveling bolt holes on one side of the form I fasten the half template to the form and drill through both. Then flip the template over and drill through the template. This will ensure the holes are symmetrical on both sides of the form. I showed doing this in an earlier photo.

Then after the garland is removed and the form is cleaned up I will place all 6 bolts in the holes and hang the form up on a wall. This way I never loose the small fasteners....OK maybe not a gold nugget but it satisfies my mind...:) I hate having to search for these small washers and nuts....and if they happen to fall on the floor... fugetaboutit!

 

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Really great documentation, as always! Thank you for sharing your time and process. 

A question about the leveling bolts - I'm guessing they are there to establish your rib heights relative to the thickness of your form and the bench top. Is that right? I was taught to plane a couple of positioning blocks to the appropriate thickness and set them on the bench top, then set the form onto the blocks. I can see how this might be an improvement, if I'm getting the purpose right. 

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1 hour ago, lpr5184 said:

I have a nice old chunk of Sitka from Bruce Harvie that I'll use for blocks....

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Went over to Bruce's last week to "pick up chunks" my self....... Great idea on the leveling bolts.

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Jackson,

Yes the bolts establish the rib heights and wood blocks would also work. I believe the C&J Book show wood screws but I like the machine bolts because they are pretty quick to adjust.

Michael,

I haven't actually been to Bruce's place but would like to make the trip. From what I've heard from others he has a lot of wood to choose from. Seems like a great guy.

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